Courses

In addition to your general education courses, you will take the following courses in Biology, Chemistry, Criminal Justice, and Physics. See the Major Requirements page for detailed information.

Click to expand to read each course description.

BIO 111 & Lab: General Biology I and Lab

This course is the first of the sequential foundational courses intended for biology and science majors. It covers the chemical processes of life, cellular organization and function, heredity, and molecular genetics. Prerequisite: high school biology.

Laboratory work illustrates the major concepts of BIO 111, which is to be taken concurrently. Course fee applicable.

Bio 112 and Lab: General Biology II & Lab

This course is the second of the sequential foundational courses intended for biology and science majors. It covers the taxonomy of Bacteria, Protists, Fungi, Plants, and Animals. Animal systems will also be introduced. Prerequisites: BIO 111 or equivalent.

Laboratory work illustrates the major concepts of BIO 112, which is to be taken concurrently. Course fee applicable.

BCH 305 & Lab: Intro to Biochemistry & Lab

Important metabolic pathways are introduced. Protein structure and function are emphasized. Fundamental concepts in biochemistry, energetics, and enzymology are presented along with the main pathways of metabolism. The coordinate regulation of glycolysis, TCA cycle, pentose cycle, glycogen metabolism, and lipid metabolism are discussed. Prerequisites: CHM 212 Lecture and Lab.

Laboratory experiments include sequence determination of a dipeptide, kinetic analysis of the acid phosphatase enzyme, purification of a blood plasma protein, SDS gel electrophoresis, Western blotting, and synthesis and purification of glucose-1-phosphate. Computer analysis of data is emphasized. Prerequisites: CHM 212 Lecture and Lab. Course fee applicable.

CHM 111 & Lab: Principles of Chemistry I & Lab

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts, theories, and methodologies of chemistry as a foundation for further study in the sciences. Topics covered include stoichiometry, chemical reactions, thermochemistry, electronic structure of atoms and molecules, periodic trends, and bonding theories. Prerequisites: high school chemistry, physics, and intermediate algebra or permission of instructor.

The laboratory course offers an introduction to modern experimental chemistry. Students are acquainted with common laboratory practices and instrumentation used to investigate chemical systems. The lab illustrates and expands upon many of the important concepts and problem-solving techniques encountered in the CHM 111 lecture course which is to be taken concurrently. Corequisite: CHM 111 Lecture. Course fee applicable.

CHM 112 & Lab: Principles of Chemistry II & Lab

This course is a continuation of CHM 111. Topics covered include gases, intermolecular forces, solids, kinetics, equilibrium, acid/base chemistry, redox chemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Prerequisites: CHM 111 Lecture and Lab.

This lab course offers an introduction to modern experimental chemistry. Students are acquainted with common laboratory practices and instrumentation used to investigate chemical systems. The lab illustrates and expands upon many of the important concepts and problem-solving techniques encountered in the CHM 112 lecture course which is to be taken concurrently. Prerequisite: CHM 111 Lecture and Lab. Corequisite: CHM 112 Lecture. Course fee applicable.

CHM 221: Analytical Chem with Lab

Principles and techniques of quantitative and instrumental analysis are introduced with special emphasis on biological and environmental applications. Topics include statistical treatment of experimental data, chemical equilibria, titrations, electrochemistry, atomic spectroscopy, high performance liquid chromatography, and gas chromatography. Prerequisites: CHM 112 Lecture and Lab. Course fee applicable. (Offered alternate years)

CHM 211 & L: Organic Chemistry I & Lab

This course is a study of organic compounds and their reactions, emphasizing structural theory. Functional groups studied include alkanes, alkenes, alynes, alkyl halides, and aromatic compounds. The theory and application of FT-NMR spectroscopy to structure determination is presented. Prerequisites: CHM 112 Lecture and Lab.

This laboratory study of organic compounds includes basic techniques of synthesis and analysis. Melting point determination, polarimetry, gas chromatography, TLC, FT-NMR and FT-IR are utilized. Rate constants and energy of activation are determined using computer graphing and analysis. Corequisite: CHM 211 Lecture. Course fee applicable.

CHM 304: Instrumental Methods of Analysis with Lab

This course serves as a survey of modern instrumental techniques available to the chemist for both quantitative and qualitative analysis. Special emphasis is placed on the theory and instrumental design for spectroscopic (UV-Vis, luminescence, IR, Raman, NMR, and MS), electrochemical (potentiometry, coulometry, voltammetry), and separation (GC, HPLC, and electrophoresis) methods. Prerequisites: CHM 112 Lecture and Lab. Course fee applicable. (Offered on demand)

CRJ 101: Intro to Criminal Justice

This overview of the criminal justice system includes its dynamics, philosophy, and historical evolution. Also included is an analysis of the roles of law enforcement and correctional agencies and of the courts. Opportunity is available for a pre-practicum experience in a criminal justice agency. Course fee applicable.

CRJ 205: Criminal Law & Processing

The purposes, functions, historical foundations, and limitations of criminal law are considered. Emphasis is on the substantive criminal law; examining specific offenses and related case law that speaks to these crimes.

CRJ 206: Criminal Procedure

This course is a continuation of CRJ 205, focusing on procedural rather than substantive criminal law. Emphasis in this course will be on a casebook approach to the actual functioning of criminal law procedures, from arrest through deposition. Recent changes and trends in procedural law will be considered.

CRJ 207 & L: Intro to Forensic Science & Lab

This course provides an introduction to the problems and techniques of scientific criminal investigation. Discussion is focused on the fundamental principles of the physical and biological sciences with concern for the application of these principles as an aid to the resolution of legal questions. The value and assistance of various scientific aids to the police officer, detective, or evidence technician in criminal investigations are examined. Also listed as NSC 207.

This laboratory is designed to provide hands-on experiences in forensic science laboratory work. Course fee applicable. Also listed as NSC 207.

CRJ 210: Criminal Investigation

Criminal Investigation is designed to provide students with the basic theoretical and philosophical understanding of the investigatory process. Analysis of problems encountered in interviewing, interrogating, evidence collection, admissibility, and testifying will be examined. Application of investigation theories to the administration of justice will also be developed. (Offered alternate years)

PHY 101 & L: General Physics I & Lab

This lecture and demonstration course is the first of two courses that present fundamental concepts and methods of classical and modern physics including kinematics, dynamics, energy and momentum, gravitation, properties of matter, electromagnetism, wave motion, light, atomic theory, nuclear theory, and particle physics. Algebra and trigonometry are used extensively. Little or no calculus is used. Prerequisites: high school algebra, trigonometry, and physics.

Laboratory work illustrates the major concepts of PHY 101, which is to be taken concurrently. Course fee applicable.

PHY 102 & L: General Physics II & Lab

This lecture, demonstration, and laboratory course is the second of two courses that present fundamental concepts and methods of classical and modern physics including kinematics, dynamics, energy and momentum, gravitation, properties of matter, electromagnetism, wave motion, light, atomic theory, nuclear theory, and particle physics. Algebra and trigonometry are used extensively. Little or no calculus is used. Prerequisite: PHY 101.

Laboratory work illustrates the major concepts of PHY 102, which is to be taken concurrently. Course fee applicable.