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Courses

NOTE:
The number in parentheses following the course title indicates the semester hours of credit assigned to the course. An H following the course number indicates an honors level course.

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BIBL 1000
Journey through the Bible [Course]

This course empowers students to deeply explore challenging biblical passages within the narrative of the Old and New Testaments. Focus is given to learning to tell and apply the various stories in Scripture in ways that are faithful to their canonical context.

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BIBL 1010
Encountering the Old Testament [Course]

This course explores the literature and thought of the Old Testament in its original historical setting in the ancient Near East and in the context of the entire biblical story. It introduces students to selected passages that represent the major sections of the Old Testament (Pentateuch, Historical Books, Wisdom Literature, Prophetic Literature) while articulating the overarching narrative coherence of the Old Testament as part of the larger story of God's purposes for the world that the entire Bible recounts.

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BIBL 1020
Engaging the New Testament [Course]

This is a survey of the New Testament Scriptures. This course provides the student with an overview of the biblical and theological foundation upon which Roberts Wesleyan College has been established. The curriculum overviews each of the New Testament books while researching the authors and the literary, sociological, and theological setting with a view toward contemporary application.

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BIBL 1500
Biblical Studies Workshop [Course]

This hands-on course introduces a variety of skills for biblical interpretation, including basic literary, historical, and linguistic tools.

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BIBL 2000
Intro Biblical Exegesis and Research [Course]

This hands-on course introduces students to the basic skills of biblical exegesis and research they will need to become responsible interpreters of Scripture. Through guided exercises, individual projects, and critical reflection on the interpretive process, students will be given the opportunity to gain a solid grounding in biblical interpretation. The course is meant to be taken alongside any BIB 200-level course in Old or New Testament and includes an introduction to library research for the purposes of writing an accomplished exegesis paper. If the student has already taken a BIBL 2000-level course, this course may be taken concurrently with a BIBL 3000-level course. Prerequisites: BIBL 1010 and 1020; Must be taken at the concurently with a BIBL 2000- or 3000-level course in either Old or New Testament.

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BIBL 2010
Synoptic Gospels: One Jesus, Three Memories [Course]

This is a study of the life of Jesus based on the three Synoptic Gospels. Specific consideration will be given to the relationship between Jesus' teaching and action and His identity and purpose. Textual issues regarding the similarity and complementarity in the gospel accounts will be explored. The relationship between the Synoptics and the Gospel of John will receive minor consideration. Prerequisites: BIBL 1010 and 1020 or permission of the instructor. (Offered alternate years)

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BIBL 2020
Acts: The Birth of the Church [Course]

This study of the unfolding history and thought of the early church is based on the Acts of the Apostles, although other sources will be introduced. A method of inductive Bible Study will be introduced and practiced throughout the course. Prerequisites: BIBL 1010 and 1020 or permission of the instructor. (Offered alternate years)

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BIBL 2060
Torah: Creation and Liberation [Course]

This course is a study of the first five books of the Old Testament. By examining selected passages, students explore Israel's view of origins, the national genesis and early history, God's will for Israel and the world, and the regulations for worship. An emphasis is placed on the examination of the various forms of literature that are represented in the Pentateuch, especially in respect to their role in forming and communicating the central themes and concepts in the Pentateuch.

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BIBL 2070
Apocalyptic Literature: Daniel and Revelation [Course]

This course surveys the relationship between the Old and New Testaments, including the developments between the testaments. The impetus for this study is located in the challenging books of Daniel and Revelation. An important part of the study is a consideration of the major historical, religious, and literary developments that arise in the intertestamental period. Apocalyptic literature, the LXX, and the Dead Sea Scrolls play a significant role in this regard. Selected texts will be examined to illustrate the main aspects of this study. Prerequisites: BIBL 1010, and 1020 or permission of the instructor. (Offered alternate years)

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BIBL 3000
Topics in Old Testament or New Testament Theology [Course]

This course introduces advanced students on in-depth study of major theological themes in the Old Testament or New Testament or to intensive study of important recent books in Old Testament theology or New Testament theology. Different topics and/or books will be selected from year to year. Utilizing class lectures and student-led seminars, the course aims to deepen student understanding of important Old Testament scholarship by exposure to a range of secondary literature in the field. Prerequisites: BIBL 1010, 1020, at least two 2000- or 3000-level Old Testament BIBL courses or permission of instructor. Recommended for seniors. (May be repeated if topic differs.) (Offered alternate years)

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BIBL 3010
Prophets and Politics [Course]

This course examines selected passages from the prophets of Israel. It will display their unique styles and forms of these passages, their theological emphases, and their responses to the historical crises. Prerequisites: BIBL 1010 and 1020 or permission of instructor. (Offered alternate years)

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BIBL 3040
Pauline Letters: Apostle to the Nations [Course]

A study of the letters of the Apostle to the Gentiles, this course explores Paul's thought in its context. Special attention will be given to recurring issues and theological themes in Paul's writing. Prerequisites: BIBL 1010, 1020 and one 2000-level New Testament BIB course or permission of the instructor. (Offered alternate years)

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BIBL 3050
The Gospel and Letters of John: The Word Became Flesh [Course]

This study of Johannine literature examines its unique characteristics and theology. Prerequisites: BIBL 1010, 1020, and one 2000-level New Testament BIB course or permission of the instructor. (Offered alternate years)

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BIBL 3060
General Epistles [Course]

This course will focus on the letter to the Hebrews, exploring its descriptions of Christ's identity and work. Attention will be also be given to the letters of James, Peter, and Jude. Prerequisites: BIBL 1010, 1020, and one 2000-level New Testament BIB course or permission of the instructor. (Offered alternate years)

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BIBL 3090
Wisdom Literature and Psalms [Course]

The rich tradition of poetry and wisdom literature in the Old Testament is explored in this course. Selected passages are studied in order to introduce the student to the basic literary structures and the central ideas and terms incorporated in these traditions. Prerequisites: BIBL 1010 and 1020. (Offered alternate years)

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BIBL 4050
Seminar in Old Testament Exegesis [Course]

This course introduces advanced students to in-depth study of a particular Old Testament book through class lectures and student-led seminars. Books selected for study vary from year to year and might include 1 & 2 Samuel, Amos, Genesis, Isaiah, Job, Exodus, etc. The course will focus on careful literary analysis of, and theological reflection on, the selected Old Testament book, with the aim of helping students learn to become competent and informed exegetes of Scripture. Prerequisites: BIBL 1010, 1020, and at least two 2000- or 3000-level Old Testament BIBL courses or permission of the instructor. BHEB 1010 and 1020 are recommended but not required. Recommended for seniors. (May be repeated if topic differs.) (Offered alternate years)

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BIBL 4060
Seminar in New Testament Exegesis [Course]

This course introduces advanced students to in-depth study of a particular New Testament book through class lectures and student-led seminars. Books selected for study vary from year to year, and might include Mark, Romans, 1 & 2 Corinthians, Hebrews, Revelation, etc. The course will focus on careful inductive, social and literary analysis of, and theological reflection on, the selected New Testament book, with the aim of helping students learn to become competent and informed exegetes of Scripture. Prerequisite: BIBL 1010, 1020, and at least two 2000- or 3000-level New Testament BIBL courses or permission of the instructor. BGRK 1010 and 1020 recommended but not required. Recommended for seniors. (May be repeated if topic differs.) (Offered on demand)

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BIBL 4900
The Bible in its World [Course]

This course is offered as part of a tour of the Holy Land and other countries, under the direction of a College faculty member. Students taking this course for credit must do collateral readings and assignments in association with the tour. The specifics of individual course design are to be completed and approved by the faculty member and the division chair prior to the tour. Prerequisites: BIBL 1010 and 1020 and one 2000 level New Testament BIBL course.

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BIBL 4950
Independent Study [Course]

Independent study provides opportunity to pursue advanced or special-interest topics not covered in the curriculum. Prerequisites: 1. Junior standing. 2. A minimum of 9 semester hours in the discipline of the Independent Study. 3. A minimum grade point average of 2.50 in the discipline. 4. Proof of motivation and ability to work independently. 5. Approval of the department in which the study is to be taken. 6. Permission from the student's advisor, the course instructor, the Department Chair, the School Dean, and the Registrar.

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NOTE:
The number in parentheses following the course title indicates the semester hours of credit assigned to the course. An H following the course number indicates an honors level course.

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BGRK 1010
Elementary Greek I [Course]

Beginning students learn the basics of New Testament Greek forms, syntax, and vocabulary through exercises and quizzes. (Offered alternate years)

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BGRK 1020
Elementary Greek II [Course]

This course continues Elementary Greek I and includes some reading from the Johannine writings of the Greek New Testament. Prerequisite: BGRK 1010 or permission of the instructor. (Offered alternate years)

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BGRK 2010
Exegetical Greek [Course]

The method and rules of exegesis are learned. Systematic practice in translating from the Greek New Testament is required. Prerequisite: BGRK 1020 or permission of the instructor. (Offered alternate years)

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BGRK 2020
Readings in New Testament Greek [Course]

This course provides the intermediate student with the opportunity to translate and analyze selected New Testament passages. The focus is on the development of translation and hermeneutical skills through attention to grammar, syntax, and structure. Prerequisite: BGRK 2010 or permission of the instructor. (Offered alternate years)

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BGRK 4950
Independent Study [Course]

Independent study provides opportunity to pursue advanced or special-interest topics not covered in the curriculum. Prerequisites: 1. Junior standing. 2. A minimum of 9 semester hours in the discipline of the Independent Study. 3. A minimum grade point average of 2.50 in the discipline. 4. Proof of motivation and ability to work independently. 5. Approval of the department in which the study is to be taken. 6. Permission from the student's advisor, the course instructor, the Department Chair, the School Dean, and the Registrar.

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NOTE:
The number in parentheses following the course title indicates the semester hours of credit assigned to the course. An H following the course number indicates an honors level course.

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BHEB 1010
Elementary Hebrew I [Course]

Beginning students learn the basics of biblical Hebrew. The course lectures introduce the student to the language in a systematic way, beginning with the simple and regular forms and then processing toward the more complex aspects of the language. The emphasis is on mastering the basic forms, syntax, and vocabulary through exercises and quizzes. (Offered alternate years)

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BHEB 1020
Elementary Hebrew II [Course]

Beginning students continue to develop their understanding of the basics of biblical Hebrew. The course lectures continue to present the simple and regular forms, while progressing toward the more complex aspects of the language. The emphasis continues to be on mastering the basic forms, syntax, and vocabulary through exercises and quizzes. The student applies and reinforces developing language skills through translating short sections of the Hebrew text of the Old Testaments. Prerequisite: BHEB 1010. Offered alternate years.

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BHEB 2010
Intermediate Hebrew I [Course]

This course builds on the foundation laid in Elementary Hebrew I & II. The main emphasis of this course is on the continuing development of the student's understanding of Hebrew grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, as well as the cultivation of basic reading skills in the Hebrew text. Regular reading assignments taken from selected portions of the biblical text, e.g. Genesis and Ruth, provide an opportunity to gain basic proficiency in reading narrative passages in the Hebrew text of the Old Testament. Integrated into the reading of the text is an inductive review of the basics of the language. The grammar and syntax assignments introduce the student to a significant number of weak and irregular forms and assist in developing a strategy for rapid recognition of such forms. Vocabulary building continues to emphasize frequent and important forms. The course also introduces the student to some of the basic principles of Hebrew lexical studies and the basic lexical tools that are available to the student of Biblical Hebrew. Prerequieist: BHEB 1020. (Offered alternate years)

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BHEB 2020
Intermediate Hebrew II [Course]

This course prepares the student for exegetical studies in the Hebrew text of the Old Testament. The approach of the course is to work intensively with selected texts, while expanding and deepening the student's knowledge of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. A number of important resources for the study of grammar and syntax are introduced in conjunction with the solution of grammatical and syntactical problems in the text. Sound hermeneutical principles are discussed at the appropriate points, and especially those related to the effective use of biblical languages in the study of the Old Testament. The student is given the opportunity to compare her/his own insights with those found in standard commentaries as the course progresses. The texts studied in this course are taken primarily from the hymnic, wisdom, and prophetic literature of the Old Testament. Important aspects of working with Hebrew poetic texts in particular are discussed. Throughout the course, the student is introduced to a number of standard reference works and resources that are of great benefit to the student who is proficient in the Hebrew language. Prerequisite: BHEB 2010. (Offered alternate years)

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NOTE:
The number in parentheses following the course title indicates the semester hours of credit assigned to the course. An H following the course number indicates an honors level course.

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THEO 2000
Exploring the Christian Worldview [Course/Lab]

This course will introduce students to the biblical worldview which forms the overarching framework of the Old and New Testaments. Students will explore important themes such as the creation, humanity in God's image, covenant, evil and idolatry, the kingdom of God, and the nature of redemption. Students will also take a critical look at the origins of and recent shifts in the dominant worldview that shapes contemporary Western culture, and we will ask what it means to be a faithful follower of Christ both in our academic work as students and in the whole of our lives in contemporary culture. Students will be encouraged to reflect on their own gifts and calling in God's world. The course includes a discussion section that meets regularly throughout the semester. Prerequisites: BIBL 1010, 1020, and PHL 2202 (Offered alternate years)

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THEO 2050
Theology & Gender [Course]

This course is designed to help the student understand the influence that gender has on biblical interpretation and theological perspectives. Included among the topics of discussion is a consideration of the biblical material related to the nature of the human being as well as the ethical and social implications of a theology of human equality. In addition, the course seeks to expose the student to major models of feminist theological interpretation. It is hoped that this exposure, along with class discussion and reflection, will assist the student in coming to her or his own assessment of the relative value of each of these models for articulating a faithful and constructive theology for contemporary culture. (Also listed as SGEN 2050) Prerequisites: BIBL 1010, 1020, PHIL 2202. (Offered alternate years)

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THEO 2700
Biblical Theology & Spiritual Formation [Course]

This course introduces students to some of the main Christian ideas about the nature of faith, God, Jesus, and creation. Students will explore these ideas in their ancient and modern contexts while developing their ability to think theologically. In this hands-on course, students will learn and practice a variety of spiritual disciplines and learn to understand such practices within the faithful framework of a robust biblical-theological understanding of God.

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THEO 2701
Biblical Grace and Salvation [Course]

This course introduces students to the saving work of Jesus Christ. The course focuses on Jesus Christ, the doctrine of atonement, the Holy Spirit, the doctrine of salvation, and the outworking of salvation in the church and through an eschatological perspective. Students will explore these ideas in their ancient and modern contexts while developing their ability to think theologically.

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THEO 2750
Knowing God: Introduction to Christian Theology [Course/Lab]

"This course provides an introduction to the main themes of Christian theology from both systematic and biblical perspectives. Areas of exploration will include the doctrines of God, creation, humanity, revelation, redemption, church, and last things. In addition to offering a survey of the major tenets of the Christian faith, this course seeks to encourage inquiry about the nature of Christian faith and helps students develop their abilities to think and express themselves theologically. This course will include a lab for exploring spiritual disciplines and practices as they connect to the study of theology. Prerequisites: BIBL 1010 and 1020 strongly recommended for those who have not studied the Bible previously."

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THEO 2800
Biblical Theology of Creation [Course]

This course explores the biblical understanding of creation with an emphasis upon practical applications for creation-care today.

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THEO 2900
Biblical Ethics [Course]

In this course students study biblical-theological systems if ethical decision-making and apply what they learn to the analysis of ethical and social issues in contemporary society, including abortion, affirmative action, capital punishment, cloning, constitutional freedoms, euthanasia, pacifism and just war, and extreme poverty.

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THEO 3000
Topics in Theological Studies [Course]

This course is an upper-level seminar for students desiring advanced study in the craft of theology. Through examination of the writings of selected theologians, Christian thinkers, and theological topics, the course offers an in-depth analysis of the various sources, norms, and criteria that have been used in the development of Christian theology. Content differs from year to year. Prerequisites: BIBL 1010, BIBL 1020, PHIL 2202, and THEO 2750 or permission of the instructor. (May be repeated if content differs.) (Offered alternate years)

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THEO 3050
World Religions [Course]

This study will focus on Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism, giving attention to the origins, development, literature, and belief systems of these religions. Issues of inter-religious dialogue will be examined.

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THEO 3250
Seminar in Wesleyan Thought [Course]

This course examines the thought of John Wesley and his interpreters down to the present.

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THEO 3300
Christology: Jesus in Theology & Culture [Course]

Jesus asks his followers, “Who do you say that I am?”(Mk 8:29). Like his disciples, we are obliged to answer this question. This course will explore theological understanding of Jesus Christ, his life, death, and resurrection, from the perspective of the Gospels, history, and culture including interaction with cultures around the world. This course will give students an opportunity to study the meaning and significance of Jesus’ life and mission for the world.

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THEO 3400
Skepticism, Atheism and Religious Faith [Course]

What does it mean to attain depth in life and to become authentically human? What are obstacles to doing so? And is religious faith (a) inimical, (b) irrelevant, or (c) essential to reaching this goal? The aim of this course is to think about these closely related questions through a study of Friedrich Nietzsche and Soren Kierkegaard, two 19th century thinkers whose relevance and importance today is even greater than it was in their own time.

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THEO 3750
Biblical Theology & Contemporary Culture [Course]

This advanced interdisciplinary seminar course explores the intersection of the biblical worldview with contemporary postmodern culture. The course addresses different foci from year to year. These might include biblical resources for meeting the challenges of postmodern life and ministry, contemporary Christian responses to postmodern thought, critical analysis of popular music in contemporary culture, and an appraisal of postmodern interpretive strategies for reading Scripture. Prerequisites: BIBL 1010, 1020, THEO 2000, PHIL 2202 (Recommended for juniors and seniors)

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THEO 4010
Theological Issues in Historical Perspective [Course]

Christian thought is examined as it developed in its environments. The course focuses on selected scholars or topics. Prerequisites: BIBL 1010,1020 and PHIL 2202 or permission of the instructor. (Offered alternate years)

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THEO 4060
Psychology and Theology [Course]

This study of the interface between psychology and theology begins with a consideration of the philosophical underpinnings of the major psychological theories and then moves to a comparison of biblical and scientific facts or interpretations. Specific topics addressed in this course may include the psychology of conversion, prejudice and religiosity, and the behavioral implications of faith. Prerequisites: PSYC 1010 and PHIL 2202 or permission of the instructor. Open to Juniors and Seniors only. Also listed as PSYC 4060

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THEO 4900
Theology on Location [Course]

This course will offer students an opportunity to engage in various 'on location' study opportunities relevant to a particular topic in Religion & Philosophy. Students will be expected to participate in some traditional classroom work, but the course will include travel time (from a few days to three weeks) to destinations that relate to the topic of the course. Course topics will change. The travel component of this course will usually take place during a summer term. Students should expect to pay an additional fee to cover travel expenses.

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THEO 4950
Independent Study [Course]

Independent study provides opportunity to pursue advanced or special-interest topics not covered in the curriculum. Prerequisites: 1. Junior standing. 2. A minimum of 9 semester hours in the discipline of the Independent Study. 3. A minimum grade point average of 2.50 in the discipline. 4. Proof of motivation and ability to work independently. 5. Approval of the department in which the study is to be taken. 6. Permission from the student's advisor, the course instructor, the Department Chair, the School Dean, and the Registrar.

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