Courses

Music Therapy Courses

NOTE:
The number in parentheses following the course title indicates the semester hours of credit assigned to the course. An H following the course number indicates an honors level course.

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MTR 101
Intro to Music Therapy [Lecture]

This course will provide an overview of the field of music therapy including theoretical frameworks, a historical review, professional requirements, and clinical applications, giving students a generalized understanding of the current state of practice and research. General principles and approaches will be examined and students will explore the therapeutic applications of music across a variety of populations and settings.

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MTR 120
Music Therapy Practicum I [Practicum]

Students will engage in fieldwork experiences in diverse clinical settings under the supervision of a board-certified music therapist. Through these experiences, students will develop an understanding of the music therapy process including assessment, documentation, treatment planning, implementation, termination, and collaboration with a treatment team. In addition to the fieldwork experience, students will attend a one-hour weekly seminar on campus with music therapy faculty. Prerequisites: MTR 101

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MTR 210
Instrumental Methods & Repertoire [Lecture]

This course provides and introduction to string, wind, and brass technique and mechanics as well as an overview of world music instruments. Students will learn how to integrate instrumental experiences into the music therapy session. This course will also cover basic repertoire across a variety of genres and cultural traditions. Prerequisite: MTR 101

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MTR 220
Music Therapy Practicum II [Practicum]

Students will engage in fieldwork experiences in diverse clinical settings under the supervision of a board-certified music therapist. Through these experiences, students will develop an understanding of the music therapy process including assessment, documentation, treatment planning, implementation, termination, and collaboration with a treatment team. In addition to the fieldwork experience, students will attend a one-hour weekly seminar on campus with music therapy faculty. Prerequisites: MTR 120

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MTR 320
Music Therapy Practicum III [Practicum]

Students will engage in fieldwork experiences in diverse clinical settings under the supervision of a board-certified music therapist. Through these experiences, students will develop an understanding of the music therapy process including assessment, documentation, treatment planning, implementation, termination, and collaboration with a treatment team. In addition to the fieldwork experience, students will attend a one-hour weekly seminar on campus with music therapy faculty. Prerequisites: MTR 220

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MTR 330
Music Therapy Foundations & Principles I [Lecture]

This course focuses on developing clinical skills including music therapy assessment, treatment, and evaluation procedures when working with individuals with developmental or physical disabilities. Philosophical approaches will be examined along with their implications on the music therapy process with these populations. Prerequisite: MTR 101

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MTR 340
Clinical Improvisation [Lecture]

Students will learn to formulate musical responses to clinical scenarios using a variety of instrumentation including voice, piano, guitar, percussion, and world instruments. Emphasis will be given on building improvisatory experiences based on a variety of musical styles, genres, and cultural traditions. Prerequisite: MTR 101

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MTR 410
Psychology of Music [Lecture]

This course examines the fundamentals of the music experience including auditory and musical perception, music cognition, creativity, music and emotions, and the social psychology of music activities. Students will also explore cultural relationships to music and their implications for how music impacts health and behavior. Prerequisite: MTR 101

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MTR 420
Music Therapy Practicum IV [Practicum]

Students will engage in fieldwork experiences in diverse clinical settings under the supervision of a board-certified music therapist. Through these experiences, students will develop an understanding of the music therapy process including assessment, documentation, treatment planning, implementation, termination, and collaboration with a treatment team. In addition to the fieldwork experience, students will attend a one-hour weekly seminar on campus with music therapy faculty. Prerequisites: MTR 320

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MTR 430
Music Therapy Foundations &Principles II [Lecture]

This course focuses on developing clinical skills including music therapy assessment, treatment, and evaluation procedures when working with individuals the elderly, individuals with substance abuse issues, and individual with mental health needs. Philosophical approaches will be examined along with their implications on the music therapy process with these populations. Prerequisite: MTR 330

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MTR 450
Music Therapy Internship [Practicum]

Supervised internship for music therapy students who have successfully completed at least 180 hours in pre-internship clinical training. Student must have passed all music proficiency exams prior to enrolling in this course. The internship must consist of a minimum of 1040 hours at either an AMTA or Roberts-affiliated clinical training center. Prerequisite: MTR 420

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MTR 498
Research in Music [Lecture]

This course will give students an overview of the current state of published music therapy research. Students will evaluate both qualitative and quantitative research articles, as well as explore specific research methods, data collection tools, and simple study design. Throughout this course students will work to establish methods to ensuring evidenced-based practice as well as develop an original research proposal. Prerequisite: MTR 101

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Social Work Courses

NOTE:
The number in parentheses following the course title indicates the semester hours of credit assigned to the course. An H following the course number indicates an honors level course.

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SWK 103
[Lecture]

This course is the beginning level course which acquaints students with the development of social work as a profession; the philosophy and value base of the profession; a generalist method of social work practice; and the diversity of settings in which generalist social work is practiced. Though it will introduce the student to all ten of our professions core competencies, three will be given special attention. Course fee applicable.

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SWK 103SW
Introduction to Contemporary Social Work [Lecture]

This course is the beginning level course which acquaints students with the development of social work as a profession; the philosophy and value base of the profession; a generalist method of social work practice; and the diversity of settings in which generalist social work is practiced. Though it will introduce the student to all ten of our professions core competencies, three will be given special attention.

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SWK 204
Social Work Settings [Lecture]

This course, a Social Work Department elective, is designed to provide sophomore level students with a basic understanding of several career tracks in the field and to assist their decision making process in field placement selection. A unique onsite visit will occur in each setting designed to increase the student’s familiarity with the social worker’s role as part of an interdisciplinary team. The student’s classroom experience will provide an in-depth exploration of the current terminology, disabling conditions, and ethical and legislative issues germane to each social work practice setting. The online component of the course will strengthen the student’s ability to participate and learn via distance technology. Prerequisite: SWK 103 (may be taken concurrently); for non-Social Work majors: permission of the instructor.

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SWK 205
Ethnic and Social Diversity [Lecture]

This foundation course is designed to provide students with knowledge of human diversity and social and economic justice in our nation and the world. Its goal is to help produce a culturally sensitive professional by increasing one’s cultural awareness, promoting one’s knowledge acquisition, and assisting in one’s skill development. A goal is for students to complete this course with a better understanding of themselves and of the diverse groups that will be examined. Also listed as SOC 205.

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SWK 205SW
Ethnic & Social Diversity [Lecture]

This foundation course is designed to provide students with knowledge of human diversity and social and economic justice in our nation and the world. Its goal is to help produce a culturally sensitive professional by increasing one’s cultural awareness, promoting one’s knowledge acquisition, and assisting in one’s skill development. A goal is for students to complete this course with a better understanding of themselves and of the diverse groups that will be examined. Also listed as SOC 205.

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SWK 206
Drugs, HIV, and the Family [Lecture]

A comprehensive required course addressing alcohol and other drug use (ATOD), HIV, as well as the impact of each on the family. Emphasis is on motivation for drug use and abuse, specific types of drugs and their identification, physiological and psychological implications of alcohol, tobacco and other (ATOD) drug abuse. There are no course prerequisites. Also listed as SOC 206.

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SWK 206PL
Drugs, HIV, and The Family [Lecture]

This is a three module course which provides an overview on drugs, HIV, and the addictive family system. Module I provides an overview on drugs and their use and misuse. Patterns of use and abuse are identified and patterns of intervention are taught. Module II provides an overview of the HIV disease with its historical content. The latest information is discussed and treatment options are highlighted. Module III provides an overview of the addictive family system and of the impact of drug use on family functioning.

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SWK 206SW
Drugs, HIV, and the Family [Lecture]

A comprehensive required course addressing alcohol and other drug use (ATOD), HIV, as well as the impact of each on the family. Emphasis is on motivation for drug use and abuse, specific types of drugs and their identification, physiological and psychological implications of alcohol, tobacco and other (ATOD) drug abuse. There are no course prerequisites. Also listed as SOC 206.

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SWK 208
Marriage and the Family [Lecture]

This course is designed to assist students in making decisions about dating, marriage and parenting. Marriage is one of the primary decisions one makes in his/her lifetime, yet in our society we take this decision so lightly. The high rate of divorce in our society seems to indicate that marriage is not a lifetime commitment, but a commitment to the relationship until one or both partners decide the relationship is no longer meaningful. The goal is to create and then sustain healthy intimate relationships. Also listed as SOC 208.

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SWK 208SW
Marriage and the Family [Lecture]

This course is designed to assist students in making decisions about dating, marriage and parenting. Marriage is one of the primary decisions one makes in his/her lifetime, yet in our society we take this decision so lightly. The high rate of divorce in our society seems to indicate that marriage is not a lifetime commitment, but a commitment to the relationship until one or both partners decide the relationship is no longer meaningful. The goal is to create and then sustain healthy intimate relationships. Also listed as SOC 208.

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SWK 213SW
Social Work in Healthcare [Lecture]

This course, a Social Work Department elective, is designed to provide the student with a base of understanding about the health care field and the social worker's role. Attention is directed to helping the student develop a beginning competence in skill for health care social work practice in both physical and mental health. Focus is also directed at the changing issues involved in health care in the 21st century. The student will study the history, ethics, and legislative issues of health care, social work practice in various health settings, the nature and psychosocial impact of several selected health problems, disabling conditions, and mental health issues, medical terminology, effects of chronic illness throughout the life span development, and present societal issues related to health care. Prerequisite: SWK 103

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SWK 301
Social Welfare History and Services [Lecture]

This course helps examines the history U.S. social welfare policies and programs in the context of by economic, political, religious and social systems. In addition, this course examines the underlying implicit and explicit values of social welfare efforts. During this course students will understand the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination considers social as they engage in the advancement of social and economic justice. Students will also analyze, formulate, and advocate for policies that advance social well-being. Attention will be given to the considering economic, ethical, religious, and/or personal values as they affect and are affected by social welfare. Course prerequisite is PSY 101.

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SWK 301SW
Social Welfare History and Services [Lecture]

This course helps examines the history U.S. social welfare policies and programs in the context of by economic, political, religious and social systems. In addition, this course examines the underlying implicit and explicit values of social welfare efforts. During this course students will understand the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination considers social as they engage in the advancement of social and economic justice. Students will also analyze, formulate, and advocate for policies that advance social well-being. Attention will be given to the considering economic, ethical, religious, and/or personal values as they affect and are affected by social welfare. Course prerequisite is PSY 101.

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SWK 302
Human Behavior and Social Environment I [Lecture]

This course is designed to provide students with knowledge about the complexities of the human experience in relation to various macro systems. The course begins with an orientation to key social systems theories to help students understand dimensions of human behavior in the social environment. Students will then learn to apply social systems theories as they critically think about the macro systems impacting communities, families and individuals. During this course students will critically examine how various systems impact individuals from a psycho social and spiritual perspective. In addition, students will learn about changing locales, populations, scientific and technological developments, and emerging societal trends so that they are equipped to provide leadership in promoting sustainable changes to improve the quality of social services. Assignments are designed to 1) help students assess and integrate multiple sources of information; 2) utilize conceptual frameworks to guide the processes of assessment, intervention, and evaluation; 3) critique and apply knowledge to understand person and environment; and 3) demonstrate effective oral and written communication.

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SWK 302SW
Human Behavior and Social Environment I [Lecture]

This course is designed to provide students with knowledge about the complexities of the human experience in relation to various macro systems. The course begins with an orientation to key social systems theories to help students understand dimensions of human behavior in the social environment. Students will then learn to apply social systems theories as they critically think about the macro systems impacting communities, families and individuals. During this course students will critically examine how various systems impact individuals from a psycho social and spiritual perspective. In addition, students will learn about changing locales, populations, scientific and technological developments, and emerging societal trends so that they are equipped to provide leadership in promoting sustainable changes to improve the quality of social services. Assignments are designed to 1) help students assess and integrate multiple sources of information; 2) utilize conceptual frameworks to guide the processes of assessment, intervention, and evaluation; 3) critique and apply knowledge to understand person and environment; and 3) demonstrate effective oral and written communication.

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SWK 308
Social Welfare Policy [Lecture]

This course focuses on basic concepts underlying the creation of social policy and its analysis. It examines the interaction of social policies and programs. Students will be introduced to the analysis of legislation and the legislative process and apply critical thinking to advance social and economic justice. Students will engage in an advocacy project utilizing social work ethical principles as a guide for professional practice. During this course attention will be given to understand how personal and societal values impact social policy. Students will also examine how their own values impact their views on social policy. This course builds on previous learning. Students will be expected to employ their knowledge from the Social Welfare Services course where historical groundwork was laid for current policy directions. Prerequisite: SWK 301.

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SWK 308SW
Social Welfare Policy [Lecture]

This course focuses on basic concepts underlying the creation of social policy and its analysis. It examines the interaction of social policies and programs. Students will be introduced to the analysis of legislation and the legislative process and apply critical thinking to advance social and economic justice. Students will engage in an advocacy project utilizing social work ethical principles as a guide for professional practice. During this course attention will be given to understand how personal and societal values impact social policy. Students will also examine how their own values impact their views on social policy. This course builds on previous learning. Students will be expected to employ their knowledge from the Social Welfare Services course where historical groundwork was laid for current policy directions. Prerequisite: SWK 301.

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SWK 310
Social Work Practice: Individuals [Lecture]

This course applies the generalist model to practice with individuals in a variety of social work settings. The content covers basic communication skills, treatment planning, and intervention skills that can be applied to working with individuals. Self-awareness; professional demeanor in behavior, appearance, and communication; recognizing the impact of diversity; and the skills of engagement, assessment, intervention, and evaluation are highlighted in the course content. Prerequisites: SWK 103 and completed application to the major.

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SWK 310SW
Social Work Practice: Individuals [Lecture]

This course applies the generalist model to practice with individuals in a variety of social work settings. The content covers basic communication skills, treatment planning, and intervention skills that can be applied to working with individuals. Self-awareness; professional demeanor in behavior, appearance, and communication; recognizing the impact of diversity; and the skills of engagement, assessment, intervention, and evaluation are highlighted in the course content. Prerequisites: SWK 103.

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SWK 311
Human Behavior and Social Environment II [Lecture]

The primary focus of this course is to help the student understand the interaction of the biological, social, and psychological systems with human behavior, as they impact the life span from infancy through late adulthood. Also, special attention is given to specific issues and life events, diversity, and theory, as related to each of the phases of the life span.

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SWK 311SW
Human Behavior and Social Environment II [Lecture]

The primary focus of this course is to help the student understand the interaction of the biological, social, and psychological systems with human behavior, as they impact the life span from infancy through late adulthood. Also, special attention is given to specific issues and life events, diversity, and theory, as related to each of the phases of the life span.

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SWK 312
Social Work Practice: Families [Lecture]

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students to social work practice within diverse family settings. Building upon the knowledge base provided by earlier courses, Practice with Families will apply five core competencies and six operationalized practice behaviors. In this course, students will identify and explore family compositions, their rules, roles, relationships and rituals. They will be trained and evaluated on their ability to work ethically, think critically, engage sensitively, assess and intervene in class and in the emergency room trauma simulation lab. SWK 103 and completed application to the major.

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SWK 312SW
Social Work Practice: Families [Lecture]

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students to social work practice within diverse family settings. Building upon the knowledge base provided by earlier courses, Practice with Families will apply five core competencies and six operationalized practice behaviors. In this course, students will identify and explore family compositions, their rules, roles, relationships and rituals. They will be trained and evaluated on their ability to work ethically, think critically, engage sensitively, assess and intervene in class and in the emergency room trauma simulation lab. SWK 103.

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SWK 321
Organizational Development & Change [Lecture]

This course focuses on change and development techniques at the organizational level while also investigating individual growth and development in addition to broader community developments. In this course students will learn how to guide an organization through growth and change, gain an appreciation for how both organizational and individual decisions affect communities, and investigate their own growth as citizens and Christians. Prerequisites: Junior standing. (Offered alternate years) This course is also listed as MGT 321.

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SWK 326
Relational Skills Training: Neurodevelopmental Differences I [Lecture and Laboratory]

This course explores the individual characteristics and interpersonal skills that contribute to effective mentoring of individuals with intellectual disabilities who are participating in college based transition programs. The course uses PEERS® (Program for the Evaluation and Enrichment of Relational Skills), an evidence-based mentor-assisted social skills intervention for young adults. During each class, mentors are taught important social skills and are given the opportunity to practice these skills in session with their assigned young adult. Students will incorporate the goals and objectives from the sessions into skill generalization activities that will be practiced in the campus community each week. Also listed as EDU 326 and PSY 326.

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SWK 327
Relational Skills Training: Neurodevelopmental Differences II [Lecture and Laboratory]

This course explores the individual characteristics and interpersonal skills that contribute to effective mentoring of individuals with intellectual disabilities who are participating in college based transition programs. The course uses PEERS® (Program for the Evaluation and Enrichment of Relational Skills), an evidence-based mentor-assisted social skills intervention for young adults. During each class, mentors are taught important social skills and are given the opportunity to practice these skills in session with their assigned young adult. Students will incorporate the goals and objectives from the sessions into skill generalization activities that will be practiced in the campus community each week. Also listed as EDU 327 and PSY 327.

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SWK 350
Field Instruction I [Practicum]

Junior year students will participate in a 40 or 80 hour supervised field instruction within a local social service agency, school, or other organization, depending on the number of credits for which the course is taken. Concurrently, students will attend a one-hour weekly field seminar class. The purpose of the field placement is to expose students to social work practice outside the classroom and help students prepare for the senior field experience. This class is intended to run concurrently with SWK 310, Social Work Practice with Individuals, and SWK 312 Social Work Practice with Families. The course is designed to expose students to the professional roles and boundaries of social work; the importance of difference in providing services to clients; the policy contexts of services; and the function of social workers in the engagement, planning, intervention, and evaluation phases of planned change. Prerequisite: open only to junior social work majors.

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SWK 350SW
Field Instruction I [Practicum]

Junior year students will participate in a 40 or 80 hour supervised field instruction within a local social service agency, school, or other organization, depending on the number of credits for which the course is taken. Concurrently, students will attend a one-hour weekly field seminar class. The purpose of the field placement is to expose students to social work practice outside the classroom and help students prepare for the senior field experience. This class is intended to run concurrently with SWK 310, Social Work Practice with Individuals, and SWK 312 Social Work Practice with Families. The course is designed to expose students to the professional roles and boundaries of social work; the importance of difference in providing services to clients; the policy contexts of services; and the function of social workers in the engagement, planning, intervention, and evaluation phases of planned change. Prerequisite: open only to junior social work majors.

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SWK 404
Social Research Methods [Lecture]

The techniques and methods of social work research are introduced and studied through course materials and the completion of an agency-based, group research project. Included are formulating research questions, understanding and implementing research design, measurement, constructing surveys, writing research reports, dealing with ethical issues, and analyzing quantitative and qualitative data. This course prepares the student to understand and implement aspects of Evidence-based Practice in social work settings.

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SWK 404SW
Social Research Methods [Lecture]

The techniques and methods of social work research are introduced and studied through course materials and the completion of an agency-based, group research project. Included are formulating research questions, understanding and implementing research design, measurement, constructing surveys, writing research reports, dealing with ethical issues, and analyzing quantitative and qualitative data. This course prepares the student to understand and implement aspects of Evidence-based Practice in social work settings.

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SWK 405
Social Work Practice: Groups [Lecture]

This course includes social work theory, knowledge, and practice with the dynamics of groups, to gain the practice skills needed to prepare the student for generalist level social work with small groups. The skills of self-awareness; attending to professional roles and boundaries; ethical decision-making; analyzing and applying different practice approaches; effective communication; and the ability to engage, assess, intervene, and evaluate within a group setting are all highlighted. It includes content on the knowledge, values, and skills to enhance the well-being of people and to aid in the reformation of the environmental conditions that affect people adversely. Prerequisite: SWK 310 or permission of instructor.

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SWK 405SW
Social Work Practice: Groups [Lecture]

This course includes social work theory, knowledge, and practice with the dynamics of groups, to gain the practice skills needed to prepare the student for generalist level social work with small groups. The skills of self-awareness; attending to professional roles and boundaries; ethical decision-making; analyzing and applying different practice approaches; effective communication; and the ability to engage, assess, intervene, and evaluate within a group setting are all highlighted. It includes content on the knowledge, values, and skills to enhance the well-being of people and to aid in the reformation of the environmental conditions that affect people adversely. Prerequisite: SWK 310

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SWK 407
SW Practice: Communities & Organizations [Lecture]

This course concentrates on the history, philosophies, principles, and intervention strategies common to community organization, social planning, and administration of social welfare agencies. Case materials are presented to highlight some of the techniques used in these practice areas. Various forms of macro practice are highlighted for discussion and learning purposes. During this course students will conduct a community needs assessment to engage and assess communities and organizations. Students will then initiate a macro intervention project using the knowledge gained from their needs assessment to intervene as change agents in community practice. Students will also evaluate the effectiveness of their completed intervention. Throughout this course, students will utilize critical thinking, engage in research informed practice, and respond to the community context from a psycho, social, spiritual perspective. Prerequisite: SWK 308.

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SWK 407SW
SW Practice: Communities & Organizations [Lecture]

This course concentrates on the history, philosophies, principles, and intervention strategies common to community organization, social planning, and administration of social welfare agencies. Case materials are presented to highlight some of the techniques used in these practice areas. Various forms of macro practice are highlighted for discussion and learning purposes. During this course students will conduct a community needs assessment to engage and assess communities and organizations. Students will then initiate a macro intervention project using the knowledge gained from their needs assessment to intervene as change agents in community practice. Students will also evaluate the effectiveness of their completed intervention. Throughout this course, students will utilize critical thinking, engage in research informed practice, and respond to the community context from a psycho, social, spiritual perspective. Prerequisite: SWK 308.

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SWK 409
Child and Family Services [Lecture]

This course is a study of the development and range of public and private social services, principally in the Western world, on behalf of children, youth, and families. This includes an analysis of issues and practice modalities in such areas as day care, foster and adoptive home care, and institutional care. The impact of substance abuse on children will also be a major topic. Prerequisite: SWK 103. (Offered alternate years)

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SWK 410
Spirituality and Social Work Practice [Lecture]

This capstone course endeavors to assist students to integrate spirituality with the professional social work perspective on helping. It provides a comparative analysis of social work values and ethics with Biblical ethics and teachings. A major emphasis of this course is placed on helping students to integrate their unique spirituality/worldview with their practice as a social work professional. Emphasis is also placed on ethical decision making; spiritual self-awareness; analysis of models of spiritual assessment; the demonstration of sensitivity, awareness, and understanding of the client’s spirituality; and the ability to engage, assess, intervene, and evaluate in practice settings in spiritually sensitive ways.

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SWK 410SW
Spirituality and Social Work Practice [Lecture]

This capstone course endeavors to assist students to integrate spirituality with the professional social work perspective on helping. It provides a comparative analysis of social work values and ethics with Biblical ethics and teachings. A major emphasis of this course is placed on helping students to integrate their unique spirituality/worldview with their practice as a social work professional. Emphasis is also placed on ethical decision making; spiritual self-awareness; analysis of models of spiritual assessment; the demonstration of sensitivity, awareness, and understanding of the client’s spirituality; and the ability to engage, assess, intervene, and evaluate in practice settings in spiritually sensitive ways.

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SWK 450
Field Instruction II [Practicum]

Field Instruction is a supervised block placement completed in the practice field 30 hours a week, with a 2-hour seminar class for theoretical integration held one day a week. The seminar will have weekly assignments, designed to facilitate the integration of the program’s core competencies and learning from the classroom and field. This course has specific assignments which integrate theory and field experience from the student’s internship. This course addresses the development of the core competencies of social work practice within the field setting. Significant emphasis is placed on the professional roles and boundaries of social work; the importance of difference in providing services to clients; the policy contexts of services; the application of aspects of Evidence-based Practice; the demonstration of effective oral and written communication in working with client systems; understanding and utilizing conceptual frameworks to guide the processes of assessment, intervention, and evaluation; and the function of social workers in the engagement, planning, intervention, and evaluation phases of planned change.

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SWK 450SW
Field Instruction II [Practicum]

Field Instruction is a supervised block placement completed in the practice field 30 hours a week, with a 2-hour seminar class for theoretical integration held one day a week. The seminar will have weekly assignments, designed to facilitate the integration of the program’s core competencies and learning from the classroom and field. This course has specific assignments which integrate theory and field experience from the student’s internship. This course addresses the development of the core competencies of social work practice within the field setting. Significant emphasis is placed on the professional roles and boundaries of social work; the importance of difference in providing services to clients; the policy contexts of services; the application of aspects of Evidence-based Practice; the demonstration of effective oral and written communication in working with client systems; understanding and utilizing conceptual frameworks to guide the processes of assessment, intervention, and evaluation; and the function of social workers in the engagement, planning, intervention, and evaluation phases of planned change.

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SWK 490
Topics in Social Work [Trip]

Junior and senior students may participate in studying a particular area of social work not covered in other course areas. Topics may include a variety of contemporary issues. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.

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SWK 495
Independent Study in Social Work [Independent Study]

Independent study provides opportunity to pursue advanced or special-interest topics not covered in the curriculum. Prerequisites: 1. Junior standing. 2. A minimum of 9 semester hours in the discipline of the Independent Study. 3. A minimum grade point average of 2.50 in the discipline. 4. Proof of motivation and ability to work independently. 5. Approval of the department in which the study is to be taken. 6. Permission from the student's advisor, the course instructor, the Department Chair, the School Dean, and the Registrar.

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SWK 495SW
Independent Study in Social Work [Independent Study]

Independent study provides opportunity to pursue advanced or special-interest topics not covered in the curriculum. Prerequisites: 1. Junior standing. 2. A minimum of 9 semester hours in the discipline of the Independent Study. 3. A minimum grade point average of 2.50 in the discipline. 4. Proof of motivation and ability to work independently. 5. Approval of the department in which the study is to be taken. 6. Permission from the student's advisor, the course instructor, the Department Chair, the School Dean, and the Registrar.

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SWK 498
Undergraduate Research [Independent Study]

Students conduct laboratory research in social work under supervision of a faculty member. Permission of instructor is required. Guidelines for Independent Study apply. A written report is required. May be repeated with new research. Prerequisites: 1. Junior standing. 2. A minimum of 9 semester hours in the discipline of the Independent Study. 3. A minimum grade point average of 2.50 in the discipline. 4. Proof of motivation and ability to work independently. 5. Approval of the division in which the study is to be taken. 6. Permission from the student's advisor, the course instructor, the Division Chair, and the Registrar.

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SWK 520
Social & Cultural Diversity [Lecture]

This course is a study of social and cultural diversity in terms of individual, group, and institutional identity formation. Theories of oppression and discrimination and their implication for social work practice are included in this course. No Prerequisities.

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SWK 525
Human Behavior and Social Environment [Lecture]

This course applies concepts from the behavioral and social sciences in identifying and understanding forms and causes of behavior. Theories are analyzed to evaluate the influence of biological, psycological, cognitive, spiritual,social and cultural variables on human behavior and development. The content focuses specifically on small social systems such as families, schools, churches, community-based groups, work sites, etc. No Prerequisities.

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SWK 530
Social Welfare Policy and Services [Lecture]

This course is structured to help students understand the historical development of Social Welfare policy and services from their Elizabethan foundations up to the present. Students will gain skills in social welfare policy analysis which will serve in assessing the potential and current impact upon programs and services. Attention will be given to the function which social welfare policy serves in either creating or mitigating the circumstances of at-risk populations. No Prerquisities.

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SWK 540
Social Work Research [Lecture]

This course introduces students to research design, sampling, data collection, and data analysis procedures. Theoretical bases for development of research questions and conducting research are analyzed. The similarities and differences of practice and research processes are evaluated. The reciprocity between practice and research, particularly the use of single-subject and multiple designs to evaluate practice, is explored. Both qualitative and quantitative methodologies are examined using research questions as a basis for selecting one or both types of methodologies in a study design. Statistics are reviewed simutaneously to teaching the use of a computer-assisted analysis program (SPSS) for analyzing data. Prerequisities: Elementary Statistics Course.

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SWK 545
Advanced Standing Seminar I [Lecture]

This course is a reading course designed to evaluate and prepare advanced standing students for beginning the advanced level of the M.S.W. The course, and SWK557 Advanced Standing Seminar II, guides students in a review of generalist knowledge, values , and skills as well as aquaints them with foundational readings revalent to the mission and goals of the program at Roberts Wesleyan College. Prerquisities: Advanced Standing Admission.

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SWK 550
Individual, Family, & Group Intervention [Lecture]

This course prepares students for generalist social work practice. Theories of practice and communication skills with individuals, families, and groups in client, target, and action systems are the focus of this course. No Prerquisities.

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SWK 552
Organization & Community Intervention [Lecture]

This course continues to prepare students for generalist social work practice. Theories of practice and communication skills with organizations and communities are the focus of this course. Prerquisities: SWK 550.

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SWK 557
Advanced Standing Seminar II [Lecture]

This course continues to prepare advanced standing students for entry into the advanced practice level of social work at Roberts Wesleyan College. This course will be an on-campus course with an emphasis on reviewing and adding to the generalist practice skills offered at the undergruduate level as well general knowledge and skills required to participate fully in the advanced level of social work education at Roberts Wesleyan College. Prerquisities: SWK 545.

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SWK 560
Social Work Practice & Religion [Lecture]

This course addresses spiritual/religious dynamics in social work practice and policies, value-ethical topics arising from the relationship between religion and society and implications for social work practice. Emphasis is given to the integration of Christianity and social work practice. No prerequisites.

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SWK 565
Psychopathology [Lecture]

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding (both cognitive and empathic) of the various kinds of disorders that social work clients in physical and mental health settings may experience. It will help students define those clinical entities, to explore their etiology and natural course, and to learn how to link diagnosis and intervention. Emphasis will be placed on the concepts of labeling and stigmatization, and how to employ an empowerment approach with clients who suffer from these disorders. The complexity of the intersection of the mental/emotional and physical selves will also be explored. No Prerequisites.

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SWK 570
Field Instruction I [Practicum]

This course is the first part of the foundation practice supervised field experience. The purpose of the expereince is to enable the student to apply generalist practice social work knowledge, values, and skills in preparation for advanced practice in the second year. The course includes a field seminar designed to support the student during the beginning and the middle phases of their experience and to help make the connection between the classroom and field. A minimum of 400 hours for SWK 570 and SWK 575 combined is required. Prerequisite: Permission of Field Director

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SWK 575
Field Instruction II [Practicum]

The objectives for the field experience are organized around the foundation program objectives. These objectives along with the Learning Agreement, provide the basis for the student evaluation. The course objectives are organized into ten major areas: Professional Development, Values and Ethics, Diversity, Social and Economic Justice, Populations-at-risk, Human Behavior and Social Environment, Policy and Services, Practice, Research, Field Experience. Prerequisite: Permission of Field Director.

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SWK 615
Justice, Values and Ethics [Lecture]

This course examines principles and theories that influence and define the concept of social justice. The interface of the Judeo-Christian value perspective and social work values, attitudes and principles is analyzed. Based on theories of social justice and the Judeo-Christian value perspective, decision-making and ethical actions in social work practice are explored. Specific service needs of the low income at-risk populations are examined. Prerquisities: SWK 575, or Advanced standing.

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SWK 625
Child-Family Multidimensional Assessment [Lecture]

This course is designed to provide students with differential assessment knowledge and skills suitable for use with advanced practice theories in child and family settings. Using a multidimensional strategy that works from a strenghths oriented eco-systems framework, the course aims to provide skills related to the various aspects of assessment. The impact of discrimination, oppression, and economic deprivation, and the role of values and ethics will also be explored. SWK 651 - Family Therapy is to be taken concurrently. Prerequisitie: All foundational courses or advanced standing.

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SWK 626
Mental Health Multidimensional Assessment [Lecture]

This course is designed to provide students with differential assessments knowledge and skills suitable for use with advanced practice theories in physical and mental health settings. In preparing students to work with persons needing physical and mental health services, this course addresses a variety of issues related to assessment including diversity, the impact of discrimination/oppression, and the role of values and ethics. SWK 661 Physical and Mental Health Practice Theories is to be taken concurrently. Prerequisite: All foundational courses or advanced standing.

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SWK 630
Child and Family Policy [Lecture]

This course reviews the roots of contemporary family policy and the construction of national family policy. It applies policy analysis skills in examining current policies and the impact of these policies on service delivery to children and families. The effectiveness of service delivery is evaluated with particular emphasis on services provided to low income at-risk populations. The various levels where policy is forged through debate, enacted, and implemented will be examined and experienced. Prerequisities: All foundation courses or advanced standing.

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SWK 635
Mental Health Policy [Lecture]

This course reviews the roots and construction of contemporary policies in the area of physical and mental health. It applies policy analysis skills in examining current policies and the impact of these policies on service delivery. The effectiveness of service delivery is evaluated with particular emphasis on services provided to low-income at-rist populations. The various levels where policy is forged through debate, enacted, and implemented are examined. Prerequisite: All foundation courses or advanced standing.

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SWK 642
Applied Social Work Research [Lecture]

Applied Social Work Research is designed to support students in conducting evidence-based practice in an agency setting by evaluating practice and planning for change. Case material will be drawn from practice situations students encounter in their field placements. Prerequisite: SWK 540.

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SWK 651
Child and Family Theories [Lecture]

Normal and maladaptive patterns in families as they progress through life stages are explored with a focus on environmental and cultural obstacles to family functioning. Family therapy approaches are examined and analyzed from cultural-sensitive, gay and lesbian, feminist, religious, and low-income population-at-risk perspectives. The family treatment process based on a multidimensional assessment is explored. The process presented focuses on relationship-building with the family as a system and its members, and general treatment issues. SWK 625 Child/Family Multidemensional Assessment is to be taken concurrently. Prerequisities: All foundation courses or advanced standing.

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SWK 652
Child and Family Interventions [Lecture]

This course explores advanced theory and intervention approaches for social work practice with children and families using the spiritually enriched strengths-oriented life model as an integrative framework. Application of theories to practice is emphasized. Focus is on specific problems experienced by children, adolescents, and adult couples within a family context. Students research and analyze selected interventions, do training presentations for their colleagues, prepare a personal progress report on professional use of the self including self-awareness, personality and personal style, countertransference issues, and burnout prevention, and construct a personal model integration statement. Prerequisute: SWK 625 and SWK 651.

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SWK 661
Mental Health Theories [Lecture]

This course explores theories related to normal and maladaptive behavior of clients in physical and mental health settings. The socio-historical context, value orientations, motivational constructs, orientation to heath and pathology, and theory of cure of a variety of approaches will be explored, which will lead to the application of intervention techniques. The relationship of client diversity and mental and physical health practice theories will be explored. SWK 626 Physical and Mental Health Multidimensional Assessment is to be taken concurrently. Prerequisities: All foundation courses or advanced standing.

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SWK 662
Mental Health Interventions [Lecture]

This course builds upon the content of the SWK 661 course and has the overall goal of developing an awareness of a variety of brief therapy-oriented techniques from a number of theoretical perspectives and of synthesizing these techniques into an interlocking model that can be utilized in advanced social work practice in physical and mental health settings. Attention will be directed to the best way to combine approaches and to apply them differentially based upon different situations, cultures, settings, and clients. Culturally diverse approaches to treatment will be explored. The ability to do evaluations of the effectiveness of practice interventions is addressed. Prerequisite: SWK 626 and SWK 661.

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SWK 664
Group Work [Lecture]

Diagnostic and treatment procedures in intensive group therapy are examined. Variables such as gender, race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status are analyzed in relation to effective utilization of group therapy. Prerequisities: All foundation courses or advanced standing.

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SWK 670
Field Instruction III [Practicum]

This course is the first part of the advanced practice supervised field experience. The purpose of the experience is to enable the student to apply advanced social work knowledge, values, and skills in a field setting in their concentration. The course includes a field seminar designed to support the students during the beginning and middle phase of their experience and to help consolidate the learning that has taken place. A minimum of 500 hours for SWK 670 and SWK 675 combined is required. Prerequisites: SWK 575 or advanced standing and permission of Field Director.

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SWK 675
Field Instruction IV [Practicum]

This course is the second part of the advanced practice supervised field experience giving the students an opportunity to apply advanced social work knowledge, values, and skills in a field setting in their concentration. The course includes a field seminar designed to support the students during the middle and termination of their field experience and to help consolidate the learning that has taken place. A minimum of 500 hours for SWK 670 and SWK 675 combined is required. Prerequisities: SWK 670, permission of Director of Field Education.

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SWK 680
Field Instruction for Summer Block Placement [Practicum]

This course is part of the advanced practice supervised field experience giving the student an opportunity to apply advanced social work knowledge, values, and skills in a block placement setting in their concentration. The course includes a field seminar designed to support the student through the experience and to help consolidate the learning from previous classes with field experiences. A minimum of 470 hours is required as well as weekly seminars. No other courses may be taken concurrently.

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SWK 701
Aging: Individual & Social Perspectives [Lecture]

This course explores theories of aging, and the physiological, psychological, and social changes that occur through the process of aging. Specifically, we examine how the social, political, economic, and the spiritual impact the aging individual and society. Current public policies will be examined to determine their impact on the delivery of service. Particular emphasis is placed on exploring demographic trends and the challenges of an aging world from a global perspective. This course is provided in an online format.

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SWK 701
[On-line]

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SWK 705
Death and Bereavement [Lecture]

This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the dying process, associated issues, and their meaning to individuals across the life-span. Death, grief, and bereavement will be examined within the cultural context. Attention will be given to life-span and family perspectives. Treatment of uncomplicated and complicated mourning will be included in the course. No Prerequisites.

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SWK 709
Child and Family Services [Lecture]

This course is a study of the development and range of public and private social services, principally in the Western world, on behalf of children, youth, and families. This includes an analysis of legislation, issues and practice modalities in such areas as day care, foster and adoptive home care, and institutional care. No Prerequisities.

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SWK 710
Adminstration and Leadership in Not-for-Profit Organizations [Lecture]

This course applies the Tri-Vector Functionalist Model, the model on which Roberts builds the Congregation and Community Practice concentration. Organizing, Administering, and Program Directing are necessary areas of knowledge and skill needed to help churches and church-related agencies mobilize resources for social ministry. The program-directed emphasis is upon use of self in providing services to the various subsystems in the Church and community, while creating structure that enables the social worker to standardize his or her professional activity. The emphasis here would be upon mezzo level practice, because churches often have a tradition of helping but lack formal structures and systemic processes to accomplish effective and efficient helping. Students will develop leadership and administrative skills to create and sustain programs within churches, denominational agencies, and communities. A sustained emphasis in this course will be upon understanding ecclesiastical-organizational culture, structure, knowledge, values, and skills related to administration within congregations and communities. Various practice models will be introduced. No prerequisites.

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SWK 713
Social Work in Phys/Mental Health Care [Lecture]

This course examines the ways in which biological, psychological, and social forces interact with each other and impact upon individuals, families, and communities. It also analyzes and evaluates the effectiveness of the range of mental and physical health delivery systems, principally in the United States. The role of the social worker interacting with other health professionals is examined. No Prerequisities.

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SWK 715
Integration of SW & Christian Theology [Lecture]

This course is designed to build upon the foundation of the First Year Social Worker and Religion Course and to offer a more in-depth examination of the integration of Christian faith and social work practice. Students from either group will be able to deepen and broaden their knowledge of basic theological doctrines and principles and their application to social work and apply this knowledge to social work within the context of a variety of practice settings. This is a required course in the Church Social Work Concentration and is also offered as an elective course for students in the other concentrations of the Roberts Wesleyan MSW program. No Prerequisites.

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SWK 720
Black Church: Social Welfare Institution [Lecture]

This course leads students into an exploratory study of the functional role of the Black Church as a social welfare institution. The analysis is centered within the African-American context through which African-American voices will speak, thus facilitating an understanding of the preeminent role of the Black Church in meeting physical, social, psychological, political, and spiritual needs of the Black masses. Attention will be given to the emerging role of the Black Church on the threshold of the 21st century and the transitional issues related to the Black Church's Social Welfare role. No Prerequisites.

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SWK 721
Human Rights and Social Work Practice in a Global Context [Lecture]

This course seeks to help students “think globally and act locally.” Toward this end, the course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of human rights and social work practice in a global context. Course content areas include values, ethics, policies, and institutions that may contribute to, or help alleviate, human rights and social issues such as globalization, environmental degradation, poverty, discrimination and oppression, armed conflict, and forced migration. The course will provide an overview of social work across the globe and help prepare students to apply a global perspective to social work practice in the United States with specific focus on populations such as migrant workers, immigrants, and those who came as asylum seekers or as refugees.

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SWK 724
Play Therapy Techniques [Lecture]

This is a practice course for mental health professionals. Participants should have their masters or be in pursuit of their masters in a mental health related field. This course will provide participants with a variety of play therapy techniques that can be used to engage children in the healing process. The techniques fall under a variety of theoretical approaches and can be tailored to the child. Participants will enhance their skills in working with children and realize the power of play.

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SWK 725
Child-Centered Play Therapy [Lecture]

This course will provide participants with a theoretical understanding of Child Centered Play Therapy. Participants will also learn to apply this theory to different clinical settings (e.g. schools, outpatient clinics) and different child populations. Upon completion of this course participants will be able to develop goals, implement, and evaluate Child Centered Play Therapy. Attention will be given to populations that would and would not benefit from this model.

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SWK 730
Marital Therapy [Lecture]

This course covers the fundamentals and practice of marital therapy in social work advanced practice. Twentieth Century trends regarding marriage will be explored. The approach to marital therapy taken by various theoretical models will be presented and critically reviewed. Intervention techniques that can be used in a variety of settings will be addressed. Preventive strategies for strengthening marriages as well as remediation strategies for various problems will be explored. No Prerequisites.

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SWK 733
Family Violence [Lecture]

This course is an in-depth analysis of the etiology dynamics of family violence. The analysis considers social, political, and economic dynamics that affect individuals and families. Appropriate assessment and treatment strategies to restore healthy family functioning and empower the victims are examined. Emphasis is on the need for quality direct services as well as public policy change. No Prerequisites.

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SWK 734
Play Therapy [Lecture]

This course is a practice elective. The purpose of this course is to provide students with exposure to and an opportunity to develop knowledge and skills in using play therapy with individuals, families and groups in diverse settings. Students will become familiar with various theoretical practice models and learn to apply those models with children experiencing a variety of problems across diverse populations. This course will expose the student to basic knowledge about play therapy as a component of services to children, including in mental health, child welfare, health and community based settings.

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SWK 735
Conflict Management [Lecture]

Conflict is an inevitable and ubiquitous phenomenon that can be either constructive or destructive. In this course, the causes and dynamics of conflict as well as ways to transform conflict into a constructive force in a school setting will be explored. This interactive course focuses on the development of school-based conflict transformation skills, with primary emphasis given to mediation and Life Space Crisis Intervention.

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SWK 736
Working with Trauma: Theory & Invertention in Social Work [Lecture]

This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the theoretical frameworks that define and assess the types of trauma, explain its biopsychosocial effects, and inform current best practice interventions. Attention is also given to understanding vicarious trauma and trauma informed care. Finally, trauma will be looked at through a variety of specific circumstances and demographic variables.

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SWK 740
Social Work & the Criminal Justice System [Lecture]

This course is designed to provide social work students with the knowledge and skill capacity to practice social work in the criminal justice system in America. The course is divided into three parts. Part one is an overview of current trends of crime and the criminal justice system and process. The major components include the police as an institution, adjudication by the courts, and corrections. Secondly, it addresses risk assessment and management of violence in the community, with a focus on conflict management, capital punishment, retributive, rehabilitative, and restorative justice. The third part addresses a variety of social work practice settings, including the public defender’s office, probation, courts, psychiatric hospitals, child protective services, and prisons.

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SWK 751
Social Work Case Management Practice [Lecture]

This course will explore effective Case Management practice: at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels of system intervention for populations at risk. Areas to be explored include: Individual service environment, assessment, formal/informal support systems; identifying needs, securing services, and monitoring services; individual and systems advocacy, interprogram coordination, and legal issues. No Prerequisites.

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SWK 753
Family Preservation [Lecture]

This course examines family resources and adaptations associated with family transitions, environmental situations, and catastrophic events. Improving satisfaction and preventing divorce are emphasized. The philosophy and practice techniques of family preservation programs are analyzed in relation to specific family life experiences. No Prerequisites.

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SWK 755
Supervision, Consultation [Lecture]

This course examines personnel development in social work related to professional growth, task performance, and agency purposes. There will be an examination of the theory, techniques, and practice of supervision as educative, supportive, and administrative. Issues of ethnicity, gender, ethics, and power will be explored. No Prerequisites.

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SWK 761
Social Work Issues in Health Care [Lecture]

This course explores the ecology of social work in health care at the threshold of the 21st Century. This is accomplished by examining an array of practice contexts and issues which affect the practice of social work in health care. Of particular concern is the dynamism which managed care has given social work within the health care enterprise. Students will analyze the resultant diffusion of boundaries between mental and physical health care, and explore the challenges involved in moing toward a more seamless reformulation of social work methods and processes within health care. No Prerequisies.

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SWK 763
Cognitive and Behavioral Interventions [Lecture]

This course covers the use of behavioral and cognitive interventions with individuals, groups, families, and couples in a variety of social work practice settings. Theoretical frameworks underlying cognitive and behavioral treatment are examined, and a variety of intervention skills are learned. Variables such as gender, race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status are analyzed in relation to effective utilization of cognitive and behavioral interventions. No Prerequisites.

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SWK 766
Bioethics [Lecture]

This course is designed to help the student understand the traditional systems of ethical decision-making and learn to utilize this knowledge in the analysis of some of the relevent ethical issues which arise in medical and environmental contexts. Topics to be examined include population policy, abortion, genetics, bioethical parenting, experimentation with research subjects, and euthanasia.

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SWK 767
Personality Theory [Lecture]

This course examines the theories of personality including psychoanalytical, trait, existential, and behavioral. Theorists' histories, concepts of personality structure and development, and related research are explored.

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SWK 794
International Social Work [Trip]

Cross-Cultural Experience in Social Work will introduce students to social work systems and processes as carried out in a country or territory other than the United States. Students will gain personal experience and interpersonal skills that can be effective tools when working with culturally and racially diverse groups. This course will explore selected social work policies as they relate to the nation's plans and programs in education, public information, and social welfare. Students will explore social work issues, agencies and programs sponsored by the Church, and/or those sponsored by the public sector. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

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SWK 795
Independent Study [Independent Study]

This course is an elective in the curriculum that allows students the opportunity to expand on the research conducted in the Applied Research course or to expand their knowledge and/or skills in an in-depth and individual manner. The independent study is arranged with and supervisied by a graduate faculty member. No Prerequisites.

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Music Courses

NOTE:
The number in parentheses following the course title indicates the semester hours of credit assigned to the course. An H following the course number indicates an honors level course.

Click on each course to expand for the description.
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MUS 100
[Lecture]

Attendance is required for all Music majors at this weekly meeting for departmental recitals and/or seminars. A grade is given based on attendance requirements, which include evening programs.

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MUS 101
Theory I [Lecture]

The fundamentals in music are studied, including notation of pitch in various clefs, scales, intervals, elements of rhythm, triads and seventh chords, diatonic chords, principles of voice leading, part-writing, and harmonic progression.

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MUS 101A
Aural Skills I [Lecture]

All courses in the sightsinging sequence include rhythmic studies, singing with solfege syllables, and melodic and rhythmic dictation exercise. This course involves singing and aural recognition of diatonic intervals in the major and minor modes. Rhythms are limited to the first division of the beat in simple and compound meters. Taken concurrently with MUS 101 unless approved by the Division Chair.

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MUS 102
[Lecture]

This course is a continuation of MUS 101 with the addition of part-writing with inverted triads, seventh chords in root position and inversion, nonchord tones, and elements of form. Prerequisite: MUS 101.

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MUS 102A
Aural Skills II [Lecture]

Exercises include melodies in major and minor modes with chromatic alteration and single modulation, the subdivision of the beat, and syncopation. Prerequisite: MUS 101A.

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MUS 104
[Lecture]

Students are introduced to the art of music and its materials with emphasis on the development of listening skills. Requirements of the course include attendance at assigned recitals and concerts on campus and at other Rochester institutions. This course is not open to Music majors.

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MUS 104PL
Introduction to Music [Lecture]

Students are introduced to the art of music and its materials with emphasis on the development of listening skills. Requirements of the course include attendance at assigned recitals and concerts on campus and at other Rochester institutions. This course is not open to Music majors.

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MUS 108
Popular Music [Lecture]

This course will examine a variety of today's popular music artists as well as those from other eras who have influenced them. Musical aspects such as instrumentation, lyrics, and song form will be highlighted, as well as how the evolution of music over time coincides with the evolution of an ever changing American culture.

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MUS 112
Music History and Literature I [Lecture]

The literature, stylistic features, and historical background of music from antiquity through the 17th century are examined. The relationships between music and general culture are also examined.

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MUS 116
Teaching Musical Concepts/Children Ages 4-7 [Lecture]

Musical concepts and teaching procedures appropriate for pre-school and kindergarten music are taught using the keyboard as the primary instrument. Open to students outside the piano pedagogy certificate program. (Offered in summer only)

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MUS 120
Jazz History [Lecture]

A comprehensive study of the history of jazz beginning in the 1890's to the present, including the social, ethnic, and economic environment in and around New Orleans at the turn of the century. Recorded examples of jazz from ragtime through fusion will be analyzed. Also included are biographical studies of the most influential musicians responsible for the stylistic shifts that occurred during the 20th century.

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MUS 125
Percussion Methods [Lecture]

Students learn to play percussion instruments including snare, timpani, mallet and auxiliary percussion. No audit is permitted. Prerequisite: Music Major

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MUS 130
String Methods [Lecture]

Students learn to play string instruments including violin, viola, cello, and bass. No audit is permitted. Prerequisite: Music Major.

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MUS 200
Theory III [Lecture]

This course is the continuation of MUS 102, with the introduction of chromatic harmony via secondary functions, mode mixture, the Neapolitan Chord, and modulation processes. Prerequisite: MUS 102.

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MUS 200A
Aural Skills III [Lecture]

Exercises include chromaticism in diatonic context, further division of the beat, triplets in simple meter, duplets in compound meter, and changing meters. Prerequisite: MUS 102A.

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MUS 205
Theory IV [Lecture]

This continuation of MUS 200 pursues chromaticism with other altered chords, enharmonic spellings and modulations, and concludes with an introduction to twentieth-century practices. Prerequisite: MUS 200.

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MUS 205A
Aural Skills IV [Lecture]

Aural Skills IV is designed to further personal musicianship through learning chromatic tonal harmony within the context of standard repertoire. Students in the course will also (a) hone solfège, listening, and sight-singing skills, (b) continue development of functional piano skills, (c) improvise, and (d) compose and arrange.

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MUS 208
Piano Pedagogy III [Lecture]

This continuation of MUS 207 is designed for teaching the third-level student. Students work with major, minor, augmented, and diminished triads in all inversions, two-octave scales, and related theory. Prerequisite: MUS 207. (Offered in summer only)

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MUS 212
Music History & Literature II [Lecture]

The literature, stylistic features, and historical background of 17th century through the early Romantic music are examined. The relationships between music and general culture are also examined.

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MUS 213
Fretboard Harmony [Lecture]

This course is designed to develop a full knowledge of the fretboard through the study of fingerings, harmony, sight-reading, score reading, transposition, and figured bass. (Offered on demand)

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MUS 216
[Lecture]

The continuation of MUS 208 is for teaching the fourth- and fifth-level student. More advanced solo and ensemble literature in the four major historical periods is used. Four-octave scales, diminished 7th exercises, theory using chormatic harmony and 7th chords, and improvisation in various styles are included. Prerequisite: MUS 208. (Offered in summer only)

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MUS 230
Brass Methods I [Lecture]

Students learn to play brass instruments including horn, trumpet, trombone, and tuba. No audit is permitted. Prerequisite: Music Major.

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MUS 231
Brass Methods II [Lecture]

This is a continuation of MUS 230.

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MUS 235
Woodwind Methods I [Lecture]

Students learn to play woodwind instruments including flute, oboe, clarinet, saxophone, and bassoon. No audit is permitted. Prerequisite: Music Major.

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MUS 236
Woodwind Methods II [Lecture]

This is a continuation of MUS 235.

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MUS 237
String Pedagogy [Lecture]

The objective, procedures, and methods of teaching string instruments (violin, viola, cello, bass) and the development of teaching skills for private and group lessons are studied. Demonstration and participation are included. Offered on demand.

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MUS 260
Chorale [Performance]

Students selected by audition meet four hours a week. The Chorale performs a wide range of choral literature for men's and women's voices. Concerts are presented on annual tours and in the surrounding area. Auditions are held each fall.

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MUS 261
Percussion Ensemble [Performance]

Students selected by audition meet two hours per week. The Ensemble usually presents one evening performance per semester. The Percussion Ensemble meets weekly, performing a variety of literature and offering opportunities for performance both on and off campus. Membership is by audition.

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MUS 263
Men's Chorus [Performance]

The Men's Chorus meets twice weekly. It is a group of 4-12 auditioned singers and perform for on- and off-campus activities. Membership is by audition.

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MUS 264
Jazz Ensemble [Performance]

The RWC Jazz Ensemble is made up of 16-20 musicians and performs composed and improvised music derived from the American big band tradition; African-American composers and improvisers; contemporary classical music; and Latino, Brazilian, and various other ethnic traditions. Two hours of weekly rehearsal: sectional rehearsals also required. One major concert per semester, with additional performances on and off campus. Membership is by audition.

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MUS 265
Wind Ensemble [Performance]

Students, selected by audition, meet four hours a week. The Wind Ensemble performs an extensive range of concert repertoire. Concerts are presented on an annual tour and in the surrounding area. Auditions are held each fall.

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MUS 266
Jazz Combo [Performance]

Experience is offered in small chamber jazz groups that perform throughout the school year on and off campus.

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MUS 267
Instrumental Chamber Ensemble [Performance]

Rehearsals, coaching, and literature are arranged by consensus and faculty coach approval. Performances are combined with other groups, usually one evening program per semester, and occasionally during Music Seminar (MUS 100).

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MUS 270
College-Community Orchestra [Performance]

Rehearsal is one evening a week. The College-Community Orchestra is open to qualified instrumentalists from the College and community. The orchestra normally performs five concerts each year.

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MUS 274
Gospel Choir [Performance]

The Gospel Choir meets twice weekly. Created for the purpose of continuing a variety of African-American church traditions, the choir offers opportunities for performance both on and off campus. The choir is open to all students without audition.

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MUS 275
Women's Choir [Performance]

This group rehearses three hours a week. The Women's Choir offers opportunities for performance both on and off campus. The choir is open to all women students without auditions.

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MUS 280
Class Guitar I [Lesson]

Students receive group instruction in functional guitar for Music Education and Music Therapy majors.

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MUS 281
Class Guitar II [Lesson]

Students receive advanced group instruction in functional guitar for Music Therapy majors.

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MUS 285
Secondary Instrument - Clarinet [Performance]

This course is designed for non-woodwind instrumental music education majors. Students learn to play the clarinet at an intermediate level. No audit is permitted.

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MUS 286
Secondary Instrument - Trombone [Performance]

This course is designed for non-brass instrumental music education majors. Students learn to play the trombone at an intermediate level. No audit is permitted.

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MUS 287
Secondary Instrument - Strings [Performance]

This course is designed for string music education majors. Students learn to play the violin or cello at an intermediate level. No audit is permitted. (offered on demand)

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MUS 294
Music in Community Service [Performance]

This course provides students with the opportunity to perform off-campus to gain experience in their field. Requirements include approval of music selections by appropriate faculty and coaching by faculty before performances. (Offered on demand)

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MUS 295
Basic Conducting [Lecture]

Students study the fundamental techniques of conducting. This course is required as a core course for Music majors, and is recommended for liberal arts students and students studying for the ministry. To be taken concurrently with MUS 295 OPE by Music Education students.

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MUS 295
Basic Conducting [OPE]

(25 hours school-based field experience.) Students observe and participate in local school classrooms. To be taken concurrently with MUS 295 by all Music Education majors.

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MUS 295BN
Life Learning Experience [Portfolio]

In this course students apply the theories that support learning from personal experience. Students will draw from the works of educators such as Dewey, Piaget, Lindeman, and Kolb. They will write a life-learning essay on an approved topic.

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MUS 295OM
Life Learning Experience [Portfolio]

In this course students apply the theories that support learning from personal experience. Students will draw from the works of educators such as Dewey, Piaget, Lindeman, and Kolb. They will write a life-learning essay on an approved topic.

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MUS 296
Music in the Church [Lecture]

Students survey the history of church music with focus on hymnody, analysis and evaluation of hymns and hymn tunes, discussion of music in worship, and development of basic song leading skills. (Offered alternate years)

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MUS 301
Jazz Arranging & Composing [Lecture]

Jazz Arranging and Composing is a course designed to instruct the student in arranging for rhythm section plus four wind instruments (four part density) and serves as a pre-requisite to arranging for the standard 16-17 piece jazz ensemble. Offered on demand.

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MUS 302
Choral Conducting [Lecture]

This course studies choral techniques and literature. Prerequisite: MUS 295.

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MUS 303
Instrumental Conducting [Lecture]

This study of instrumental techniques and literature emphasizes beat patterns, various styles of conducting, and rehearsal techniques. Class participation in a lab band is required. Prerequisite: MUS 295.

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MUS 308
School Music Methods [Lecture]

The philosophy, objectives, and procedures of teaching music in the public schools are studied with an emphasis on teaching general music in grades 1-8. Students gain practical experience planning and teaching lessons which require the application of current methodologies, development of children's musical behaviors, and creation of authentic world music learning experiences. To be taken concurrently with MUS 308 OPE by Music Education students. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Music Education major.

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MUS 308
School Music Methods [OPE]

(25 hours school-based field experience.) Students observe and participate in local school classrooms. To be taken concurrently with MUS 308 by all Music Education majors.

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MUS 309
Vocal Pedagogy [Lecture]

Emphasis is on pedagogical principles of German, Italian, French, and English schools of voice training. Fundamental knowledge of scientific concepts of breathing, phonetics, and resonance are included. (Offered alternate years)

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MUS 310
Musical Stage Production [Performance]

The fundamentals of the production of staged works will be covered such as appropriate repertoire selection, holding productive auditions, considerations in making casting decisions, organizing musical and stage rehearsals, building sets, lighting, organization of props, costumes, sets, make-up, etc.

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MUS 313
Guitar Pedagogy [Lecture]

This course is designed to examine the historic and contemporary materials and techniques available for effectively teaching the guitar to students at all levels. The course surveys a wide range of method and studies, and examines the effectiveness of various pedagogical approaches to technique and interpretive analysis. The history of guitar pedagogy is also studied. (Offered on demand)

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MUS 315
Instrumental Methods [Lecture]

The objectives, procedures, and methods of teaching instrumental music in the public schools are studied. “To be taken concurrently with MUS 315 OPE. Prerequisite: MUS 308.

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MUS 315
Instrumental Methods [OPE]

(25 hours school-based field experience.) Students observe and participate in local school classrooms. To be taken concurrently with MUS 315 by all Music Education majors.

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MUS 316
Vocal Methods [Lecture]

The objectives, procedures, and methods for teaching general and vocal music in the public schools are studied. Demonstration and participation are included. to be taken concurrently with MUS 316 OPE. Prerequisite: MUS 308

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MUS 316
Vocal Methods [OPE]

(25 hours school-based field experience.) Students observe and participate in local school classrooms. To be taken concurrently with MUS 316 by all Music Education (Vocal) majors.

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MUS 317
Piano Field Experience I [Practicum]

This course, designed for piano performance majors, requires weekly observation and teaching under the supervision of a member of the piano faculty. Prerequisite: MUS 311. Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MUS 318.

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MUS 318
Piano Pedagogy [Lecture]

Piano pedagogy is the study of the teaching of piano. This course includes the examination of current teaching methods, ranging from the beginner level through the early-intermediate level both for children and adults; a study of strategies for teaching rhythm, reading, technique, musicality, theory, and general music literacy; and a study of the business of piano teaching. Students will gain practical experience in lesson planning and organization, applying skills learned in class, by teaching a private student.

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MUS 319
Vocal Field Experience [Practicum]

This course, designed for vocal performance majors, requires weekly observation and teaching under the supervision of a member of the vocal faculty. Prerequisite: MUS 309. Offered on demand.

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MUS 320
Instrumental Field Experience [Practicum]

This course, designed for instrumental performance majors, requires weekly observation and teaching under the supervision of a member of the instrument faculty. Prerequisite: MUS 315 (non-string) or MUS 237 (strings). Offered on demand.

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MUS 324
Opera Workshop [Performance]

Fundamentals of stage performance and the production of operas, operettas, and/or musicals are studied, equipping the student with skills necessary to succeed as a teacher and as a performer. Course may be repeated for 0 credit.

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MUS 325
Diction for Singers [Lecture]

The purpose of Diction for Singers is to develop the voice student's understanding and mastery of the pronunciation of English and the foreign languages commonly used in the performance of classical vocal literature: French, German, and Italian. (Offered alternate years)

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MUS 328
Piano Pedagogy II [Lecture]

Piano Pedagogy II is a continuation of Piano Pedagogy I, Mus 318. Students will continue to develop their understanding of learning styles and teaching strategies with an emphasis on the intermediate-advanced student. Students will gain an in-depth knowledge of the intermediate and early-advanced teaching repertoire, learn how to teach technique and artistry through those pieces, and develop the ability to diagnose problems and find solutions while accommodating the students’ individual learning styles and needs. Prerquisite: MUS 318

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MUS 330
Jazz Theory/Improvisation [Lecture]

Through the aural study of jazz traditions and cultural influences, students learn the theory and practices of jazz improvisation. The jam session setting emphasizes learning to swing and improvise over songs from the classic American songbook.

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MUS 340
Music History & Literature III-Modern & World Music [Lecture]

The history, background, cultural context, literature, stylistic features, and perspectives regarding Modern and World Music are examined.

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MUS 380
Class Voice [Lesson 1 Credit]

Students receive group instruction with individual attention in functional voice.

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MUS 390
[Lecture]

This is a survey of representative Baroque and Classical keyboard works with emphasis on comparative listening. (Offered on demand)

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MUS 391
[Lecture]

This survey of representative Baroque and Classical works emphasizes literature for practical teaching. (Offered alternate years)

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MUS 392
Instrumental Literature [Lecture]

This is a survey of representative works from Baroque to 20th century with emphasis on comparative listening and literature practical for teaching. (Offered on demand)

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MUS 411
Orchestration [Lecture]

This course is a study of instrumental characteristics and notation, scoring and arranging for the instruments of the orchestra and band from small to large ensembles. Prerequisite: MUS 200.

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MUS 418
Piano Field Experience II [Practicum]

This course is a continuation of MUS 317. (Offered on demand)

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MUS 443
K-12 Music Education Student Teaching Seminar [Lecture]

This capstone experience is taken concurrently with student teaching. The students will debrief and process their student teaching experiences. Attention will be given to classroom management issues, to schools as organizations, to hiring and interviewing processes, and to the review of pedagogical issues in music.

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MUS 491
Vocal Literature II [Lecture]

This survey of representative Romantic and twentieth century works emphasizes literature for practical teaching. (Offered alternate years)

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MUS 495
Independent Study in Music [Independent Study]

Independent study provides opportunity to pursue advanced or special-interest topics not covered in the curriculum. Prerequisites: 1. Junior standing. 2. A minimum of 9 semester hours in the discipline of the Independent Study. 3. A minimum grade point average of 2.50 in the discipline. 4. Proof of motivation and ability to work independently. 5. Approval of the department in which the study is to be taken. 6. Permission from the student's advisor, the course instructor, the Department Chair, the School Dean, and the Registrar.

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MUS 498
Undergraduate Research [Independent Study]

Students conduct laboratory research in music under supervision of a faculty member. Permission of instructor is required. Guidelines for Independent Study apply. A written report is required. (May be repeated with new research.) Prerequisites: 1. Junior standing. 2. A minimum of 9 semester hours in the discipline of the Independent Study. 3. A minimum grade point average of 2.50 in the discipline. 4. Proof of motivation and ability to work independently. 5. Approval of the division in which the study is to be taken. 6. Permission from the student's advisor, the course instructor, the Division Chair, and the Registrar. (Offered on demand)

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MUS1001
Applied Piano [Lesson 1 Credit]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1001
Applied Piano [Lesson 2 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1001
Applied Piano [Lesson 3 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1002
Applied Organ [Lesson 1 Credit]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1002
Applied Organ [Lesson 2 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1002
Applied Organ [Lesson 3 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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(1)
MUS1003
Applied Voice [Lesson 1 Credit]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1003
Applied Voice [Lesson 2 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1003
Applied Voice [Lesson 3 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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(1)
MUS1004
Applied Violin [Lesson 1 Credit]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1004
Applied Violin [Lesson 2 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1004
Applied Violin [Lesson 3 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1005
Applied Viola [Lesson 1 Credit]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1005
Applied Viola [Lesson 2 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1005
Applied Viola [Lesson 3 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1006
Applied Cello [Lesson 1 Credit]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1006
Applied Cello [Lesson 2 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1006
Applied Cello [Lesson 3 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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(1)
MUS1007
Applied String Bass [Lesson 1 Credit]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1007
Applied String Bass [Lesson 2 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1007
Applied String Bass [Lesson 3 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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(1)
MUS1008
Applied Trumpet [Lesson 1 Credit]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1008
Applied Trumpet [Lesson 2 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1008
Applied Trumpet [Lesson 3 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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(1)
MUS1009
Applied French Horn [Lesson 1 Credit]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1009
Applied French Horn [Lesson 2 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1009
Applied French Horn [Lesson 3 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1010
Applied Trombone [Lesson 1 Credit]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1010
Applied Trombone [Lesson 2 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1010
Applied Trombone [Lesson 3 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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(1)
MUS1011
Applied Baritone [Lesson 1 Credit]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1011
Applied Baritone [Lesson 2 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1011
Applied Baritone [Lesson 3 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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(1)
MUS1012
Applied Euphonium [Lesson 1 Credit]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1012
Applied Euphonium [Lesson 2 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1012
Applied Euphonium [Lesson 3 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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(1)
MUS1013
Applied Tuba [Lesson 1 Credit]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1013
Applied Tuba [Lesson 2 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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(3)
MUS1013
Applied Tuba [Lesson 3 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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(1)
MUS1014
Applied Flute [Lesson 1 Credit]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1014
Applied Flute [Lesson 2 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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(3)
MUS1014
Applied Flute [Lesson 3 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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(1)
MUS1015
Applied Clarinet [Lesson 1 Credit]

Course fee applicable.

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(2)
MUS1015
Applied Clarinet [Lesson 2 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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(3)
MUS1015
Applied Clarinet [Lesson 3 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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(1)
MUS1016
Applied Oboe [Lesson 1 Credit]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1016
Applied Oboe [Lesson 2 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1016
Applied Oboe [Lesson 3 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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(1)
MUS1017
Applied Bassoon [Lesson 1 Credit]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1017
Applied Bassoon [Lesson 2 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1017
Applied Bassoon [Lesson 3 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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(1)
MUS1018
Applied Saxophone [Lesson 1 Credit]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1018
Applied Saxophone [Lesson 2 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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(3)
MUS1018
Applied Saxophone [Lesson 3 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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(1)
MUS1019
Applied Percussion [Lesson 1 Credit]

Course fee applicable.

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(2)
MUS1019
Applied Percussion [Lesson 2 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1019
Applied Percussion [Lesson 3 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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(1)
MUS1020
Applied Guitar [Lesson 1 Credit]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1020
Applied Guitar [Lesson 2 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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(3)
MUS1020
Applied Guitar [Lesson 3 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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(1)
MUS1021
Jazz Improvisation [Lesson 1 Credit]

Course fee applicable.

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(2)
MUS1021
Jazz Improvisation [Lesson 2 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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(3)
MUS1021
Jazz Improvisation [Lesson 3 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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(1)
MUS1022
Applied Harp [Lesson 1 Credit]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1022
Applied Harp [Lesson 2 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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MUS1022
Applied Harp [Lesson 3 Credits]

Course fee applicable.

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(1)
MUS1025
[Lesson 1 Credit]

The principles and problems of accompanying are studied. Students attend a private or class lesson each week and accompany three students per semester (assigned by piano faculty). Course fee applicable.

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MUS1026
Applied Composition [Lesson 1 Credit]

Weekly composition lessons working one-on-one with the composition teacher. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

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MUS1026
Applied Composition [Lesson 2 Credits]

Weekly composition lessons working one-on-one with the composition teacher. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

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MUS1031
Class Piano I [Lesson 1 Credit]

For Performance and Music Education majors, passing the piano proficiency exam is required; this course is preparation toward the exam. The objective is to develop functional keyboard skills that will support the student’s long-term musical goals. Content includes music theory, aural skills, improvisation, accompanying, ensemble and performance skills, and score reading. A course fee applies.

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MUS1032
Class Piano II [Lesson 1 Credit]

For Performance and Music Education majors, passing the piano proficiency exam is required; this course is preparation toward the exam. The objective is to develop functional keyboard skills that will support the student’s long-term musical goals. Content includes music theory, aural skills, improvisation, accompanying, ensemble and performance skills, and score reading. A course fee applies.

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MUS1033
Class Piano III [Lesson 1 Credit]

For Performance and Music Education majors, passing the piano proficiency exam is required; this course is preparation toward the exam. The objective is to develop functional keyboard skills that will support the student’s long-term musical goals. Content includes music theory, aural skills, improvisation, accompanying, ensemble and performance skills, and score reading. A course fee applies.

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MUS1034
Class Piano IV [Lesson 1 Credit]

For Performance and Music Education majors, passing the piano proficiency exam is required; this course is preparation toward the exam. The objective is to develop functional keyboard skills that will support the student’s long-term musical goals. Content includes music theory, aural skills, improvisation, accompanying, ensemble and performance skills, and score reading. A course fee applies.

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MUS1090
Applied Conducting [Lesson 1 Credit]

Course fee applicable. Prerequisite: MUS 295

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(2)
MUS1090
Applied Conducting [Lesson 2 Credits]

Course fee applicable. Prerequisite: MUS 295

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