Courses

Research Practicum (PSY 407)

Every year approximately 7-10 juniors or seniors sign up to take this advanced research course. Those students become members of Dr. Bassett's research team and work directly with him on unique and significant research studies--gathering and analyzing data, and assisting in the formal report writing. For over 15 years, nearly every student who has taken this course has been a co-author on at least one research project that has been presented professionally (at conferences or as a journal article).

 

NOTE:
The number in parentheses following the course title indicates the semester hours of credit assigned to the course. An H following the course number indicates an honors level course.

Click to expand and read course descriptions.
(3.0)
PSY 101
General Psychology [Lecture]

This course provides an introduction to the general principles of pyschology. The student is acquainted with the human organism, its behavior, and some of the mechanics and dynamics of learning, perception, sensation, emotion, and motivation. The course gives a broad view of psychology and is prerequisite to all other psychology courses.

Close
(3.0)
PSY 201
Developmental Psychology [Lecture]

The physical, intellectual, social, and emotional aspects of the developing individual from the prenatal period through adulthood and old age are studied. Selected theories of development are also discussed. This course may not be taken for credit by students who have already received credit for PSY 203. Preferred for Psychology majors. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or permission of the instructor.

Close
(2.0-3.0)
PSY 202
Human Sexuality [Lecture]

This course is designed to help the student understand normal and abnormal human sexual behavior and attitudes. Sexuality will be considered from many angles, including the biological, psychological, behavioral and spiritual perspectives. Also listed as SOC 202 and WST 202.

Close
(3.0)
PSY 203
Child and Adolescent Development [Lecture]

This course offers the student a topical introduction to human development, with an overview of "arenas" of human development from childhood through adolescence. The topical areas focus on developmental change within specific domains of functioning, including the cognitive, physical, social, perceptual, and moral development arenas. Particular emphasis is placed on child and adolescent development as it affects performance and social adjustment in schools. This course may not be taken for credit by students who have already received credit for PSY 201.

Close
(3.0)
PSY 203PT
Child and Adolescent Development in the Urban Context [Lecture]

This course is designed to engage students in a meaningful exploration of human development from prenatal experience through adolescence. Attention will be given to the nature of development across major domains (physical, cognitive, social-emotional, and moral), the impact of context (familial, school, community, and culture) on development, the construction of identity, and the concept of developmentally appropriate teaching practice. Special attention will also be given to contemporary issues and the urban context, such as parent-school-community partnerships; the development of gender, racial, and ethnic identity within increasingly diverse communities; and teaching the whole child/adolescent. 25 OPE hours are associated with this course.

Close
(3.0)
PSY 208
Psychology of Human Relationships [Lecture]

Understanding human relationships is important for the achievement of both personal and professional goals. This course examines theories and research on human relationships and personal adjustment, and encourages the application of these theories and skills to everyday interactions in a wide variety of settings. Throughout the course, students will be encouraged to consider these issues from the perspective of the Christian faith. This course is intended for students who are interested in learning how to apply basic psychological principles in order to promote healthy relationships and personal wellness, in their work settings and everyday lives.

Close
(3.0)
PSY 260
Organizational Behavior [Lecture]

This course examines group behavior and how group functioning affects organizational effectiveness. Emphasis is placed on decision-making and resolving conflicts in groups. Also listed as SOC 260, BUA 260.

Close
(3.0)
PSY 301
Psychology of Gender [Lecture]

This course is designed to provide a broad overview of the field of psychology of gender, weaving together relevant theory and research from the areas of developmental, social, physiological, and clinical psychology. The course will examine theory and empirical research relating to gender, as well as implications for social behavior, relationships, mental and physical health. Throughout the course, students will be encouraged to integrate theological perspectives into their understanding of these issues. Also listed as WST 301. Prerequisites: PSY 101 or WST 205/HUM 205

Close
(3.0)
PSY 302
Psychological Assessment [Lecture]

This course explores the essential pyschometric and statistical criteria utilized to critically evaluate and select psychological assessment instruments (e.g., reliability, validity, standard error of measurement). In addition, methods, techniques, and instruments for measuring individual differences in behavior are surveyed and critiqued. Included are values, ethics, and limitations of assessment; representative methods of test construction; and some laboratory experience with assessment instruments. Diverse populations are discussed and instrumentation linked to these populations are identified. Prerequisite: Mathematics 200, Psychology 101

Close
(4.0)
PSY 304
Cognitive Psychology [Lecture and Laboratory]

This course prepares upper division psychology majors and minors for advanced study in the field of psychology by providing a systematic introduction to human cognition. The course will address cognition from traditional information processing and neuro-cognitive science perspectives. Topics will include sensation and perception, attention, memory, learning, representation, language, reasoning, intelligence, and consciousness. Laboratory experiences are included. Prerequisites: PSY 101 and 201. Course fee applicable. (Offered alternate years)

Close
(4.0)
PSY 305
Psychology of Learning and Behavior [Lecture and Laboratory]

The basic phenomena and principles of the learning process in humans and animals are studied. Emphasis is placed on the following topics: conditioning, reinforcement, generalization, discrimination, concept formation, verbal learning, and memory. Lectures and a variety of laboratory experiences are included. Prerequisite: PSY 101. Course fee applicable.

Close
(3.0)
PSY 306
Social Psychology [Lecture]

This course considers social interaction as it is related to personality and behavior. Motives and attitudes are studied in their social significance and as they affect behavior of individuals and groups. Also listed as SOC 306.

Close
(4.0)
PSY 307
Physiological Psychology [Lecture and Laboratory]

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the physiological correlates of mental and emotional behavior. Sensory, motor, and neural structures and functions are studied. Laboratory studies are conducted to illustrate the major concepts. Recommended prerequisite: BIO 111 or 103, PSY 101. Offered alternate years.

Close
(3.0)
PSY 308
Counseling: Theory and Practice [Lecture]

This course introduces major theories and practices of counseling, including basic counseling skills, and provides opportunity for students to make application of the theories and methods to their field of interest. Also listed as SOC 308.

Close
(3.0)
PSY 309
Research Methods in Psychology [Lecture and Laboratory]

This is an introduction to the scientific method and research design. Emphasis is placed on the design and implementation of scientific research. Research results are approached from the standpoint of use and interpretation. Prerequisites: MTH 200 and PSY 101.

Close
(3.0)
PSY 310
Health Psychology [Lecture]

Health Psychology investigates specific mind-body connections such as the relationship between stress and the immune system, the psychological components of physical pain, the relationships between behaviors and health, etc. This course is designed to make the student aware of these connections, as well as to introduce a series of interventions designed to improve both the physical and psychological functioning of individuals. Prerequisites: PSY 101, 201.

Close
(1.0)
PSY 326
Relational Skills Training: Neurodevelopmental Differences I [Lecture and Laboratory]

This course explores the individual characteristics and interpersonal skills that contribute to effective mentoring of individuals with intellectual disabilities who are participating in college based transition programs. The course uses PEERS® (Program for the Evaluation and Enrichment of Relational Skills), an evidence-based mentor-assisted social skills intervention for young adults. During each class, mentors are taught important social skills and are given the opportunity to practice these skills in session with their assigned young adult. Students will incorporate the goals and objectives from the sessions into skill generalization activities that will be practiced in the campus community each week. Also listed as EDU 326 and SWK 326.

Close
(1.0)
PSY 327
Relational Skills Training: Neurodevelopmental Differences II [Lecture and Laboratory]

This course explores the individual characteristics and interpersonal skills that contribute to effective mentoring of individuals with intellectual disabilities who are participating in college based transition programs. The course uses PEERS® (Program for the Evaluation and Enrichment of Relational Skills), an evidence-based mentor-assisted social skills intervention for young adults. During each class, mentors are taught important social skills and are given the opportunity to practice these skills in session with their assigned young adult. Students will incorporate the goals and objectives from the sessions into skill generalization activities that will be practiced in the campus community each week. Also listed as EDU 327 and SWK 327.

Close
(3.0)
PSY 329
Applied Learning Theory: Moral Development [Lecture]

Through the writing of Perry, Piaget, Kohlberg, and other theorists, this course stresses moral development and religious values. (Offered on demand)

Close
(3.0)
PSY 401
Personality Theory [Lecture]

This study of theories of personality includes, among others, the psychoanalytic, trait, existential & behavioral theories. Theorists' histories, concepts of personality structure and development, and related research are studied. Prerequisite: Psychology 101 and 201. Open to Juniors and Seniors only.

Close
(3.0)
PSY 402
Abnormal Psychology [Lecture]

A study is made of the nature and trends of mental maladjustments, their causes, and the treatments used. Attention is also given to the factors which contribute to mental health. Prerequisite: PSY 201 or permission of the instructor.

Close
(3.0)
PSY 403
History of Psychology [Lecture]

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the historical foundation of modern scientific psychology. The place of philosophy, religion, and the sciences in the development of psychology is studied. Prerequisite: PSY 101. Open to Juniors and Seniors only. (Offered alternate years)

Close
(4.0)
PSY 405
Advanced Counseling [Lecture]

The course includes theory and methods beyond PSY 308, as well as supervised practice with volunteer counselees. Prerequisites: PSY 308 and completed Course Application.

Close
(3.0)
PSY 406
Psychology and Theology [Lecture]

This study of the interface between psychology and theology begins with a consideration of the philosophical underpinnings of the major psychological theories and then moves to a comparison of biblical and scientific facts or interpretations. Specific topics addressed in this course may include the psychology of conversion, prejudice and religiosity, and the behavioral implications of faith. Prerequisites: Psychology 101 and Philosophy 202 or permission of the instructor. Open to Juniors and Seniors only. Also listed as THE 406

Close
(3.0-4.0)
PSY 407
Research Practicum [Practicum]

This course is intended to give students experience in the planning, conducting, and analyzing of original research. In addition to providing practical experience, the course will enhance students' conceptual and analytical skills. The course itself combines seminars with supervised research experience. This course may be taken twice. Prerequisite: PSY 309. Course fee applicable.

Close
(1.0)
PSY 450A
Psychology Field Work Part I (Prep) [Lecture]

This course helps to prepare the student for internship and the job search with emphasis on resumé writing, interviewing, career development, networking, goal writing, and treatment team skills. It is required of all majors. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and formal admission to the major.

Close
(0.0-4.0)
PSY 450B
Psychology Field Work Part II [Practicum]

This course provides the student with a regularly supervised experience in an agency that offers psychological services or that conducts research. Students are usually placed in settings which emphasize either behavioral techniques, counseling, or prevention approaches with a variety of client populations. This experience enables the student to apply and integrate psychological theory, ethics, and skills with actual clients. This consists of 9-12 hours weekly of actual internship experience. Prerequisite: PSY 450A.

Close
(1.0-3.0)
PSY 495
Independent Study in Psychology [Independent Study]

Independent study provides opportunity to pursue advanced or special-interest topics not covered in the curriculum. Prerequisites: 1. Junior standing. 2. A minimum of 9 semester hours in the discipline of the Independent Study. 3. A minimum grade point average of 2.50 in the discipline. 4. Proof of motivation and ability to work independently. 5. Approval of the department in which the study is to be taken. 6. Permission from the student's advisor, the course instructor, the Department Chair, the School Dean, and the Registrar.

Close
(1.0-3.0)
PSY 498
Undergraduate Research [Independent Study]

Students conduct laboratory research in psychology under supervision of a faculty member. Permission of instructor is required. Guidelines for Independent Study apply. A written report is required. May be repeated with new research. Prerequisites: 1. Junior standing. 2. A minimum of 9 semester hours in the discipline of the Independent Study. 3. A minimum grade point average of 2.50 in the discipline. 4. Proof of motivation and ability to work independently. 5. Approval of the division in which the study is to be taken. 6. Permission from the student's advisor, the course instructor, the Division Chair, and the Registrar.

Close
(3.0)
PSY 503
Clinical Foundations of Intervention [Lecture]

This interactive course focuses on the training and practice of interpersonal skills, which are vital to functioning as a professional psychologist or counselor. The course will be centered on a three- stage helping model which assists individuals in exploring their problems, gaining insights, and taking action. In developing this helping model, three counseling theories will be explored: person-centered therapy, psychodynamic therapy, and behavior therapy. The course will largely focus on the skill development necessary to initiate helping relationships with diverse populations.

Close
(3.0)
PSY 504
Clinical Foundations of Intervention II [Lecture]

This course is designed to build upon the basic interpersonal and counseling skills developed in Interpersonal Effectiveness I (PSY/EDC 503). Emphasis will be placed on the development of further enhancement of challenging and guidance skills requisite for therapeutic intervention in established counseling relationships. In addition, several psychotherapy approaches and their intervention techniques will be presented and analyzed. Theoretical applications will be considered for both adults and children. The focus will be on developing interpersonal and therapeutic interventions which will foster change and growth in individual clients.

Close
(3.0)
PSY 513
Professional, Legal, and Ethical Practice in School Psychology [Lecture]

Students will be exposed to an historical look at the profession of school psychologist as a specialty area. This coure is introductory in nature and will look at history and systems, role and function, models of practice as well as a more contemporary look at professional practice issues. Historical change in public education will serve as the context for change in current practical models. Key pieces of educational law will be reviewed such as Section 504 of the American Disabilities Act and Part 200 of IDEA as well as ethical guidelines for school practitioners.

Close
(2.0)
PSY 516
Practicum I - School Psychology [Practicum]

This practicum experience is designed as a transition from formal coursework to learning experiences within a school setting, under the direct supervision by a licensed or certified school psychologist. Through this practicum, students are provided with the opportunity to apply their knowledge of child development, learning theory, assessment, direct and indirect interventions, and to experientially apply the theories and techniques learned in Interpersonal Effectiveness I and II (PSY 503 & 504) while working with children, teachers, and parents in a public school setting. Under the supervision of the professor, each student will be placed in a school district for two full days each week to practice testing skills, develop observation skills, further develop counseling skills and to become oriented to working with children in the schools as a psychologist. This placement serves to acclimate students to the culture of the public schools, to regular and special education and the specific role and function of a psychologist in the delivery of psychological and mental health services. Students are required to attend weekly meetings with other practicum students for case review, further supervision, topic presentations and sharing of case studies to be examined in light of theoretical and professional issues, ethics and intervention strategies.

Close
(3.0)
PSY 520
Assessment I:Psychological Measurement [Lecture]

This course is designed as an introduction to testing and measurement. Primary emphasis will be placed on building a general understanding of elementary statistics and analysis of test scores in relation to the normal curve. An understanding of reliability, validity, and normative samples will be explored through an application process using a variety of standardized instruments, which are currently used. Students will gain a general understanding of both the purpose and practice of assessment through exposure to a wide variety instruments and procedures which are both traditional and non-traditional methods. It is important to note that this course only serves as an introduction to testing and assessment and that further courses/skills training are needed for students interested in specializing in assessment.

Close
(0.0)
PSY 522
Integrative Assessment II: Individual Differences [Laboratory]

This Course exposes the student to the administration, scoring, and interpretation of individually administered norm-referenced tests and measures. Primary attention is given to instruments, which primarily measure cognitive abilities in children ages birth to age eighteen. Instruments will be evaluated based on their level of sensitivity to culturally diverse populations. Implications for the learning process in school-age children will be explored. Beginning report writing will be explored while expanding the students’ repertoire and mastery of these measures. Historical and Contemporary theories of intelligence will be discussed. A 1 hour P/F Lab will be part of this course for additional clinical practice with these instruments.

Close
(3.0)
PSY 522
Integrative Assessment II: Individual Differences [Lecture]

This Course exposes the student to the administration, scoring, and interpretation of individually administered norm-referenced tests and measures. Primary attention is given to instruments, which primarily measure cognitive abilities in children ages birth to age eighteen. Instruments will be evaluated based on their level of sensitivity to culturally diverse populations. Implications for the learning process in school-age children will be explored. Beginning report writing will be explored while expanding the students’ repertoire and mastery of these measures. Historical and Contemporary theories of intelligence will be discussed. A 1 hour P/F Lab will be part of this course for additional clinical practice with these instruments.

Close
(3.0)
PSY 540
Cognitive-Affective Bases of Behavior [Lecture]

This course will focus on two primary areas: Learning theory and behavioral analysis, and the psychology of emotion. Students will spend half the course focused on the psychology of learning, as well as the practical applications of behavioral/learning theory in clinical settings. The second half of the course will focus on the psychology of emotion, including such topics as the development of emotion in children, emotional regulation, and emotional intelligence. A portion of the course will also focus on integrating emotional theories with learning/behavioral principles. Special considerations will be given in applying these theories to work with children and adolescents.

Close
(3.0)
PSY 542
Biological Bases of Behavior/Pharmacology [Lecture]

This course will cover neuroanatomy, neural communication, and neural systems. In addition students will learn about commonly administered psychotropic drugs, their effects on the nervous system and the changes they produce in mood, consciousness, perception and behavior. Students will gain an understanding of the relationship between nervous system function and perception, cognition, emotion and behavior. They will emerge from this course with an understanding of the neurobiology of everyday functioning including such tasks as multitasking, paying attention, learning and remembering, seeing, hearing, speaking and socializing with others.

Close
(3.0)
PSY 560
Psychopathology:Adult [Lecture]

This course contributes to the core knowledge necessary for the science and practice of clinical psychology. The goal of this course is to present a conceptual framework for understanding the science of psychopathology in order to inform clinical practice. Toward this end, the course will focus on central concepts important in the description, classification, and treatment of psychopathology, including relevant aspects of the historical and cultural context of these concepts. We will explore etiological issues, the application of a biopsychosocial conceptual framework to case conceptualization, and skill development in the diagnosis of psychopathology. Issues related to socioeconomic status, gender, age, culture and comorbidity will be addressed across the course.

Close
(3.0)
PSY 565
Child & Adolescent Psychopathology [Lecture]

This course is designed to explore the complexities of child and adolescent psychopathology, with a specific emphasis on the school setting. The content will focus on the epidemiology, symptomatology, etiology, comorbidity, and treatment of different psychopathologies experienced by children and adolescents. Common assessment strategies and classification systems, such as the DSM-IV, will be examined, along with their strengths and weaknesses. Intervention and prevention approaches for specific disorders will be discussed, including a particular focus on school-based intervention programs.

Close
(3.0)
PSY 601
Research Methods and Statistics I [Lecture]

This course is deisnged to introduce students to the basic principles of research and statistical analysis. Students will be exposed to the critical evaluation of research and will survey the process of research from the development of the hypotheses to the interpretation of the data. They will gain a broader understanding of descriptive and inferential statistics and various research design strategies.

Close
(3.0)
PSY 603
Multicultural Diversity & Professional Practice [Lecture]

This course is designed to develop multicultural competency in professional mental health practice. The focus will be on increasing students’ awareness of their cultural values and biases, while also developing knowledge about how race, ethnicity, gender, religion, sexual orientation, and social class have an impact on self and the counseling relationship. Additional emphasis will be placed on surveying culturally responsive skills that are necessary to evaluate and intervene with diverse client systems.

Close
(3.0)
PSY 604
Evidence-Based Treatments & Interventions [Lecture]

This course is designed to foster the integration of clinical science and practice by examining the history, nature, and process of evidence-based practice. The course will emphasize evidence-based intervention strategies and programs designed to improve the emotional, behavioral, and social functioning of children, adolescents, and adults. Service delivery at the individual, group, and systems level will be addressed. Implementation issues specific to school and clinical settings will be examined.

Close
(2.0)
PSY 616
Practicum II - School Psychology [Practicum]

This course serves as an extention of PSY 516. The student will work in a school system one day per week and continue practicing assessment techniques. In addition, the student will be required to work directly with special needs children in a classroom setting under teacher supervision. Students will be expected to complete a project of intervention within this classroom setting, which measures student progress throughout the semester.

Close
(3.0)
PSY 621
Integrative Assessment IV - Social/Emotional Personality [Lecture]

This course provides information and training in the assessment of mental status and emotional well being in children, adolescents and adults. The course will cover more traditional projective measures as well as more recent norm-referenced thematic tools and techniques, which assess a broad range of social functioning areas. Students will be required to use these techniques both for administration and scoring, and begin interpreting results as a continuation of refining report writing skills. A major component of the course is learning to integrate assessment results from different instruments into clear and concise written reports.

Close
(3.0)
PSY 622
Integrative Assessment V:Neuropsychological Concentration [Lecture]

This course provides information and training in fundamental concepts in child neuropsychology with relevance for applied school psychological practice. A special focus will be placed on the neuropsychological factors that impact cognitive and social-emotional assessment in a school setting. Case studies will be used to illustrate key concepts and procedures. Topics will include: 1. Brain-behavior relationships and the ways school psychologists can apply neuropsychological principals and perspectives in their daily work. 2. Specific neuro-developmental syndromes and their impact on learning and behavior. 3. Understanding the content of neuropsychological and medical reports received as outside evaluations 4. Making optimal use of common psychological instruments. 5. Basic testing considerations: how to identify the need for testing; conducting a neuro- developmental history; and selection of appropriate psychological tests to answer referral questions. 6. Interpreting results using a hypothesis testing model of assessment. 7. The relationship between executive dysfunction and emotional wellness. 8. The quest for more meaningful and enduring interventions for children’s learning and adjustment problems. Specific training will be provided in the use of several instruments: WISC-IV Integrated, WJIII Cognitive, NEPSY-II, Process Assessment of the Learner: Reading and Writing, PAL Math, Test of Memory and Learning; BRIEF, Neuropsychological Checklist and Inventory, Test of Everyday Attention: Children, and the Connors Rating Scales. A major focus will be the enhancement of report writing skills that integrates formal and informal testing, observations, self-reports, and interviews.

Close
(3.0)
PSY 716
Exceptionality & Diversity [Lecture]

Inclusion of exceptional children and youth in unrestricted learning environments, and their academic success and social adjustment, requires school personnel to develop expertise in the recognition of special needs and a broad knowledge of appropriate school-based strategies for ensuring academic success and social development. This course is designed as a graduate-level introduction to the history, major issues, and contemporary practices defining exceptionalities, their categorization, and demographic characteristics.

Close
(3.0)
PSY 734
Play Therapy [Lecture]

This course is a practice elective. The purpose of this course is to provide students with exposure to and an opportunity to develop knowledge and skills in using play therapy with individuals, families and groups in diverse settings. Students will become familiar with various theoretical practice models and learn to apply those models with children experiencing a variety of problems across diverse populations. This course will expose the student to basic knowledge about play therapy as a component of services to children, including in mental health, child welfare, health and community based settings.

Close
(3.0)
PSY 735
Conflict Management [Lecture]

Conflict is an inevitable and ubiquitous phenomenon that can be either constructive or destructive. In this course, the causes and dynamics of conflict as well as ways to transform conflict into a constructive force in a school setting will be explored. This interactive course focuses on the development of school-based conflict transformation skills, with primary emphasis given to mediation and Life Space Crisis Intervention.

Close