Courses

Physical Education Courses

NOTE:
The number in parentheses following the course title indicates the semester hours of credit assigned to the course. An H following the course number indicates an honors level course.

(1.0)
PED 100
Fitness for Life [Lecture and Laboratory]

This course covers the basic components and principles of physical fitness. Each student is taught information which can be used to establish lifelong physical fitness habits. Current physical fitness levels are assessed and each student becomes involved in a personal fitness program within the lecture/laboratory course.

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(1.0)
PED 102
Skills in Bowling [PE Skills]

In these elective sport activities a skill proficiency must be reached. A maximum of 2 semester hours of skills courses may apply toward a degree but must be earned in different activities. Listings are subject to change. Course fee applicable.

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(1.0)
PED 103
Downhill Skiing/Snowboarding [PE Skills]

In these elective sport activities a skill proficiency must be reached. A maximum of 2 semester hours of skills courses may apply toward a degree but must be earned in different activities. Listings are subject to change. Course fee applicable.

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(1.0)
PED 104
Skills in Lifeguard Training [PE Skills]

In these elective sport activities a skill proficiency must be reached. A maximum of 2 semester hours of skills courses may apply toward a degree but must be earned in different activities. Listings are subject to change.

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(1.0)
PED 105
Skills in Swimming [PE Skills]

In these elective sport activities a skill proficiency must be reached. A maximum of 2 semester hours of skills courses may apply toward a degree but must be earned in different activities. Listings are subject to change.

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(1.0)
PED 106
Water Safety Instruction [PE Skills]

Students learn both the theory and practice of teaching beginning, intermediate, and advanced swimming and diving. Red Cross certification. (Offered alternate years)

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(1.0)
PED 108
Skills in Recreational Games [PE Skills]

In these elective sport activities a skill proficiency must be reached. A maximum of 2 semester hours of skills courses may apply toward a degree but must be earned in different activities. Listings are subject to change.

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(1.0)
PED 109
Skills in Tennis [PE Skills]

In these elective sport activities a skill proficiency must be reached. A maximum of 2 semester hours of skills courses may apply toward a degree but must be earned in different activities. Listings are subject to change.

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(1.0)
PED 109V
Varsity Tennis [PE Skills]

Students participating in varsity sports may earn 1 semester hour of credit toward the physical education skill requirement upon completion of two seasons of varsity participation in the same sport. Students must register during the second season of participation only.

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(1.0)
PED 112V
Varsity Soccer [PE Skills]

Students participating in varsity sports may earn 1 semester hour of credit toward the physical education skill requirement upon completion of two seasons of varsity participation in the same sport. Students must register during the second season of participation only.

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(1.0)
PED 113V
Varsity Track [PE Skills]

Students participating in varsity sports may earn 1 semester hour of credit toward the physical education skill requirement upon completion of two seasons of varsity participation in the same sport. Students must register during the second season of participation only.

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(1.0)
PED 114
Skills in Conditioning [PE Skills]

In these elective sport activities a skill proficiency must be reached. A maximum of 2 semester hours of skills courses may apply toward a degree but must be earned in different activities. Listings are subject to change.

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(1.0)
PED 115
Skills in Racquetball [PE Skills]

In these elective sport activities a skill proficiency must be reached. A maximum of 2 semester hours of skills courses may apply toward a degree but must be earned in different activities. Listings are subject to change.

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(1.0)
PED 116V
Varsity Basketball [PE Skills]

Students participating in varsity sports may earn 1 semester hour of credit toward the physical education skill requirement upon completion of two seasons of varsity participation in the same sport. Students must register during the second season of participation only.

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(1.0)
PED 117
Skills in Golf [PE Skills]

In these elective sport activities a skill proficiency must be reached. A maximum of 2 semester hours of skills courses may apply toward a degree but must be earned in different activities. Listings are subject to change. Course fee applicable.

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(1.0)
PED 117V
Varsity Golf [PE Skills]

Students participating in varsity sports may earn 1 semester hour of credit toward the physical education skill requirement upon completion of two seasons of varsity participation in the same sport. Students must register during the second season of participation only.

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(1.0)
PED 118
Skills in Bicycling [PE Skills]

In these elective sport activities a skill proficiency must be reached. A maximum of 2 semester hours of skills courses may apply toward a degree but must be earned in different activities. Listings are subject to change.

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(1.0)
PED 119V
Varsity Cross Country [PE Skills]

Students participating in varsity sports may earn 1 semester hour credit toward the physical education skill requirement upon completion of two seasons of varsity participation in the same sport. Students must register during the second season of participation only.

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(1.0)
PED 120
Skills in Backpacking [PE Skills]

In these elective sport activities a skill proficiency must be reached. A maximum of 2 semester hours of skills courses may apply toward a degree but must be earned in different activities. Listings are subject to change. Course fee applicable. (Offered on demand)

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(1.0)
PED 120V
Varsity Volleyball [PE Skills]

Students participating in varsity sports may earn 1 semester hour of credit toward the physical education skill requirement upon completion of two seasons of varsity participation in the same sport. Students must register during the second season of participation only.

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(1.0)
PED 121
Skills in Soccer/Volleyball [PE Skills]

In these elective sport activities a skill proficiency must be reached. A maximum of 2 semester hours of skills courses may apply toward a degree but must be earned in different activities. Listings are subject to change.

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(1.0)
PED 122
Skills in Tennis/Racquetball [PE Skills]

In these elective sport activities a skill proficiency must be reached. A maximum of 2 semester hours of skills courses may apply toward a degree but must be earned in different activities. Listings are subject to change.

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(1.0)
PED 123
Tae Kwon Do [PE Skills]

In these elective sport activities a skill proficiency must be reached. A maximum of 2 semester hours of skills courses may apply toward a degree but must be earned in different activities. Listings are subject to change. Course fee applicable.

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(1.0)
PED 125
Creative Movement [PE Skills]

This course teaches appreciation for and understanding of the child's basic need to move and how to implement this into the physical education curriculum. This class will address basic forms of children's dance as well as basic movement skills. (Offered alternate years)

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(1.0)
PED 150
Special Topics in Physical Education [PE Skills]

Skills classes offered due to interest or availability of instructor.

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(1.0)
PED 201
First Aid/CPR [Lecture]

Students receive American Red Cross Responding to Emergencies Certification, valid for three years, and adult cardiopulmonary resuscitation certification (CPR) and automatic external defibrillation (AED) certification, valid for one year. This course does not meet Physical Education skill requirement.

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(2.0)
PED 202
First Aid/CPR (Professional) [Lecture]

Students receive American Red Cross Responding to Emergencies Certification, valid for three years, and adult cardiopulmonary resuscitation certification (CPR) and automatic external defibrillation (AED) certification, valid for one year, as in PED 201. In addition, students in 202 receive American Red Cross CPR for the Professional Rescuer Certification valid for one year (fee required for special equipment). The focus is to prepare students who work in a variety of health care and professional rescuer positions to perform effectively the lifesaving skills required of all professional rescuers. This course does not meet Physical Education skill requirement.

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(1.0)
PED 206
Adventure Education [PE Skills]

This course is an introduction to facilitating group and individual challenges in an adventure setting. This will include problem solving, spotting skills, and trust activities as well as how to enable students to learn trust, cooperation, and healthy risk-taking behaviors. This course is designed primarily for Physical Education majors and may not be used to meet the General Education PE Skills requirement. (Offered alternate years)

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(1.0)
PED 207
Sport Education [PE Skills]

This is an activity class that will familiarize the physical education major with the tactical concepts of team sports. This class will also cover how to write lesson plans for a sport education model of teaching physical education. This course may not be used to meet the General Education PE Skills requirement for non-Physical Education majors. (Offered alternate years)

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(0.5-3.0)
PED 495
Independent Study in Physical Education [Independent Study]

Independent study provides opportunity to pursue advanced or special-interest topics not covered in the curriculum. Prerequisites: 1. Junior standing. 2. A minimum of 9 semester hours in the discipline of the Independent Study. 3. A minimum grade point average of 2.50 in the discipline. 4. Proof of motivation and ability to work independently. 5. Approval of the department in which the study is to be taken. 6. Permission from the student's advisor, the course instructor, the Department Chair, the Academic Dean, and the Registrar.

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Education Courses

NOTE:
The number in parentheses following the course title indicates the semester hours of credit assigned to the course. An H following the course number indicates an honors level course.

Click on each course to expand for the description.
(0.0)
EDU 095
Pedagogy Workshop [Lecture]

This workshop provides an opportunity for students to work with a faculty member individually or in a small group to increase pedagogical knowledge, improve teaching skills, and deepen the ability to reflect critically upon their teaching and students’ learning. The course may be taken only after a student has completed (or failed to complete) a student teaching placement. It may be required as an intervention before an additional student teaching placement or recommended based upon a student’s scores on the edTPA. The fee for this workshop will vary depending upon the amount of work that needs to be done and whether some of the work will require the student to be placed in a classroom setting for all or part of the semester. Prerequisites: 1. Demonstrated motivation and ability to learn from constructive feedback intended to improve teaching. 2. Approval of the Teacher Education Department.

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(0.0)
EDU 096
Pedagogy Workshop [Lecture]

This workshop provides an opportunity for students to work with a faculty member individually or in a small group to increase pedagogical knowledge, improve teaching skills, and deepen the ability to reflect critically upon their teaching and students’ learning. The course may be taken only after a student has completed (or failed to complete) a student teaching placement. It may be required as an intervention before an additional student teaching placement or recommended based upon a student’s scores on the edTPA. The fee for this workshop will vary depending upon the amount of work that needs to be done and whether some of the work will require the student to be placed in a classroom setting for all or part of the semester. Prerequisites: 1. Demonstrated motivation and ability to learn from constructive feedback intended to improve teaching. 2. Approval of the Teacher Education Department.

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(3.0)
EDU 185
Education in a Changing World [Lecture]

This course introduces students to education in the contemporary context, with specific attention given to the history of education and the ways that schools and teaching have changed over time; laws governing the education of all students, including special education; the rapidly increasing diversity of students in schools today; the expanding uses of technology; current challenges in education, including closing the achievement gap and meeting the needs of all students; and what it means to enter the teaching profession today. This course provides students an essential foundation for all future classes in education. Education majors will begin the process of creating a professional portfolio. Taken by all education majors.

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(3.0)
EDU 190PT
Foundations of Educating All Students [Lecture]

The course serves as the personal and pedagogical introduction to the Pathway to Teaching Program and provides an in-depth exploration into the challenges and opportunities facing teachers in today’s diverse classrooms. It begins community-building within the cohort and introduces all students to a philosophical commitment and framework for teaching all learners, regardless of students’ personal circumstances, exceptional attributes, ethnic background or linguistic diversity. Initially, the course examines the characteristics of specific disabilities and addresses the historical, legal and social bases of the education of students with special needs. The role and responsibility of educators within general education inclusive placements for exceptional learners is also discussed. The unique needs of students from ethnically and linguistically diverse backgrounds will also be reviewed. Students will examine what it means to be culturally competent, the characteristics of effective multicultural teachers, challenges of education in urban contexts, and efforts to overcome the achievement gap. Students will be asked to think critically about the cultural lenses they bring to teaching, as well as contemporary issues and controversies in the broad field of multicultural education. The focus will be on developing the knowledge, skills and dispositions required for teaching that both affirms the value of human differences and maximizes learning for all students: those considered culturally, linguistically and ability Diverse.

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(3.0)
EDU 195
Foundations of Special Education [Lecture]

This course provides an introduction to special education and exceptionalities as defined in federal and state laws and regulations. Students will develop an understanding of the needs of students with disabilities, and how to provide instruction that will promote the participation and progress of students with disabilities in the general education curriculum, consistent with NYS requirements for general and special education teachers. Students will learn the historical perspective, definitions, etiology, characteristics, needs and service delivery systems within each area of exceptionality; the nature and requirements of Individual Education Plans (IEPs); and the ways that the NYS Common Core Learning Standards are addressed for students with disabilities. To be taken concurrently with EDU 195 OPE. Taken by all education majors.

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(0.0)
EDU 195
Foundations of Special Education [OPE]

(25 hours school-based field experience) Students will visit special education programs around the Rochester area. Students will be given the opportunity to sit in on classes, observe instruction, and work with a wide range of students with disabilities. To be taken concurrently with EDU 195. Taken by all education majors.

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(3.0)
EDU 204PT
Social Foundations of Urban Education [Lecture]

This course will introduce teacher candidates to some of the major theories used to understand the relationship between society and education in the urban context. Through readings, course discussions, class activities and class assignments, teacher candidates will explore the historical, philosophical and socio/cultural events and ideas that help to shape the ways in which we understand the purpose of education and the role of urban educators. In addition to class sessions, teacher candidates will be responsible for going into “society” to engage with individuals who are directly affected by those issues the course discusses. The topics to be covered in this course include, but are not limited to: the governing of urban schools; the financing of urban schools; theories that help us understand urban education - functionalism, Marxist and postmodern theory; the hidden curriculum; critical perspectives on education, such as tracking, access to quality education, alternative approaches to traditional urban education, urban school reform, drop outs and the “school to jail pipeline”; collaborating with urban families; the rights of students, parents, community members, teachers and other educational professionals; and the influence of the legal system on the schooling of minority and marginalized students.

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(3.0)
EDU 206PT
Diagnostic & Prescriptive Teaching [Lecture]

This course provides foundational knowledge of principles and best practices associated with assessing and instructing students with special education needs in the least restrictive environment as determined by individual student needs and abilities. The course has two primary components: diagnostic practices and effective prescriptive teaching methods. Assessment procedures include an overview of measurement principles, diagnostic assessment tools, and the practical application of a range of assessment practices for classroom teachers. Specific formal and informal assessment procedures and their use for instructional evaluation and planning are reviewed. Prescriptive teaching instruction seeks to enable teachers to identify the academic and skill area strengths and weaknesses of a range of student learners, including students with disabilities, and develop and implement appropriate and effective instructional interventions to meet their individualized needs.

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(3.0)
EDU 235
Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment I [Lecture]

This course provides an integrated introduction to the processes by which teachers develop curriculum, plan and deliver instruction, and assess student learning in inclusive classroom settings. Students will learn to create lesson and unit plans, identify and use a variety of teaching strategies, monitor and adjust during instruction, and conduct informal and formal assessments. Students will learn multiple ways to use technology to enhance teaching and learning. Students will also learn the importance of adapting instruction to meet students’ learning differences and aligning instruction with the NYS Common Core Learning Standards. To be taken after or concurrently with EDU 185 and EDU 195. Taken by all Early Childhood/Special Education, Childhood/Special Education, and Adolescence Education majors.

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(3.0)
EDU 255
Foundations of Language & Literacy [Lecture]

This course focuses on beginning language users and emergent literacy. It will examine the theories and stages of oral language acquisition, the development of emergent readers and writers, and the developmentally appropriate instructional methods and materials which are used in early childhood and elementary grade classes. Students will be expected to plan lessons based on what is learned in class and from the assigned readings. To be taken after or concurrently with EDU 235. Taken by all Early Childhood/Special Education and Childhood/Special Education majors.

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(3.0)
EDU 260
Learning & Development in Early Adolescence [Lecture]

This course focuses on early adolescents (ages 10-14), with specific attention to ways of promoting successful learning and healthy development of the whole person, at home, in school, and in the wider community. Students will examine the education of early adolescents, including the history, philosophy and curricula of middle level schooling, and the development of early adolescents across multiple domains, including community-based approaches to enhancing youth development. The course meets requirements for teacher education majors seeking certification at the middle school level, but is also appropriate for other majors who are interested in understanding and working with young people. Taken by Adolescent Education majors (who are not in the 7-12 Special Education Generalist Program). Offered once/year.

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(3.0)
EDU 294
Integrated Literacy Practices Across Curriculum [Lecture]

This course is designed to prepare students to teach and integrate literacy in specific content area disciplines. Students will explore ways to collaborate and plan, within an interdisciplinary model of teaching, how to create units that focus on the use of discipline literacy and the importance of developing mediated learning experiences. A “best practices” approach to developing these experiences will also focus on strengthening literacy pedagogy centered on constructing and communicating meaning in the various disciplines. Students will utilize the New York State Common Core Learning Standards in the development of the project based learning activities required for the course. Prerequisites: EDU 185 and EDU 195. Taken by all Adolescent Education and K-12 Education majors. Offered once/year.

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(3.0)
EDU 301
Educational Psychology [Lecture]

This course provides an introduction to the concepts, principles, and theories of educational psychology, including human development, learner characteristics and variability, learning processes, instructional approaches and motivation. The focus will be on helping students to develop the knowledge, skills and dispositions needed to successfully apply educational psychology to promote learning in classroom settings. To be taken concurrently with EDU 301 OPE. Taken by Childhood/Special Education majors.

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(0.0)
EDU 301
Educational Psychology [OPE]

(40 hours of school-based Elementary field experience) Students observe and work with children in an urban elementary school classroom. Students are asked to integrate course learning with their field experience in required OPE reflection papers. To be taken concurrently with EDU 301. Taken by Childhood/Special Education majors.

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(3.0)
EDU 301PT
Educational Psychology-Learning Theory and the Urban Classroom [Lecture]

This course will examine the basic principles of Educational Psychology and the application of these principles for the purpose of improving classroom practice and student learning. Theories associated with understanding the psychological makeup of students and their motivation to learn will be considered. In addition, we will explore the employment of psychological understanding and culturally relevant teaching to support a positive urban classroom environment which high expectations exist for each and every student. 25 OPE hours are associated with this course.

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(3.0)
EDU 302PT
Inclusive Teaching Methods for Secondary Classroom [Lecture]

Teaching principles, strategies, and skills which have been validated through research on effective teaching are examined and practiced. This course also provides an introduction to lesson and unit planning, including teaching a mini-lesson. The course promotes student learning and development in a collaborative learning community for students with disabilities. 25 OPE hours are associated with this course.

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(3.0)
EDU 303PT
Foundations of Multiple Literacies [Lecture]

The course is designed to increase students' understanding of the multidimensional nature of literacy. Ideas and concepts about teaching reading from a multi-modal perspective and integrating writing and reading will be the main focus of the course. Topics will include the definition of literacy, the different modes of language use, the developmental stages of learning to read and write, instructional strategies which support students' literacy development, literacy assessment tools, and evaluating reading materials. Students will be asked to analyze what they already know about teaching literacy skills and then explore alternatives which are grounded in the best practices in literacy instruction research. By the end of the course, students will be able to determine students' needs and develop appropriate literacy lessons using a range of materials and technology.

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(3.0)
EDU 304PT
Application of Literacy Strategies [Lecture]

The course is designed to teach students the importance of strategic teaching and learning. Students gain an understanding of the historical and current concerns about literacy as a basis to knowing the importance of their roles as teachers of literacy. Students demonstrate an understanding of best practices in education by designing lessons that incorporate modern teaching/learning theories into strategic teaching. The course is designed to meet the needs of elementary and secondary teachers. Students will design projects that focus on individual content areas, learning needs and interests. This course is a continuation of the first literacy course, Foundations of Multiple Literacies. Topics will include a historical prospective of literacy, an in-depth study of current teaching and learning theories as they relate to teaching literacy skills, informal literacy assessment, data driven instruction, individualizing instruction, strategic learning, strategic teaching, classroom management and lesson design/implementation. Students will be asked to analyze what they already know about teaching literacy skills and then explore grounded alternatives from best practices of instructional literacy research. 25 OPE hours are associated with this course.

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(3.0)
EDU 307PT
Assessment for Student Learning [Lecture]

This course provides foundational knowledge of principles and best practices associated with assessing and instructing students with and without disabilities in the general education classroom. The course is designed to examine the various facets of assessment and provides ongoing opportunities for participants to examine, create, critique and revise current assessments used in their own classrooms. Participants will explore various models of effective assessment practices that promote meaningful participation in heterogeneous groups. Participants will examine the role of assessment in developing curriculum and implementing best practices for promoting challenging standards-based education for all students in the general classroom.

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(3.0)
EDU 318
History & Philosophy of Art Education [Lecture]

(See description for ART 318)

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(3.0)
EDU 320PT
Specialized Teaching Methods-Elementary [Lecture]

This course includes instruction in the NYS standards, goals, and content of the elementary school curriculum in English Language Arts, Mathematics, Science and Social Studies. The course also addresses various aspects of the teaching-learning process, and the preparation and the use of instructional materials.

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(1.0)
EDU 326
Relational Skills Training: Neurodevelopmental Differences I [Lecture and Laboratory]

This course explores the individual characteristics and interpersonal skills that contribute to effective mentoring of individuals with intellectual disabilities who are participating in college based transition programs. The course uses PEERS® (Program for the Evaluation and Enrichment of Relational Skills), an evidence-based mentor-assisted social skills intervention for young adults. During each class, mentors are taught important social skills and are given the opportunity to practice these skills in session with their assigned young adult. Students will incorporate the goals and objectives from the sessions into skill generalization activities that will be practiced in the campus community each week.

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(1.0)
EDU 327
Relational Skills Training: Neurodevelopmental Differences II [Lecture and Laboratory]

The course complements and supports the experiential learning of students currently active as peer mentors. The focus is on skills conversational skills-trading information, two-way conversations, electronic communication, entering and exiting a conversation; choosing appropriate friends, use of humor, and organized social contacts on campus. Homework will be assigned each week to be completed during individual peer mentoring sessions. Homework will be reviewed each session troubleshooting problems and individualizing the intervention to the specific needs of each participant. A certificate of training will be issued upon successful completion of this course.

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(3.0)
EDU 330
Classroom Behavior Management [Lecture]

The skills and competencies needed in order to manage effectively the classroom behavior of all students will be examined. The focus will be on the principles of developing a positive climate that facilitates learning. Participants explore the role of the teacher as the proactive manager of classroom environment, of student behavior (including self-management discipline), and of curriculum planning and delivery. To be taken concurrently with EDU 330 OPE. Taken by Education majors. (Note: EDU 330 OPE is not required for Adolescence Education majors.)

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(0.0)
EDU 330
Classroom Behavior Management [OPE]

(30 hours of school-based field experience) The student will record reflections of school-based experience in a journal. The journal will include examples of how the teacher facilitated the management of students and comments on how the environment was structured to facilitate learning. To be taken concurrently with EDU 330. Taken by Education majors. (Note: EDU 330 OPE is not required for Adolescence Education majors.)

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(3.0)
EDU 330PT
Managing Student Behavior in Inclusive Classrooms [Lecture]

This course will introduce teacher candidates to the knowledge and teaching strategies necessary in order to create safe and nurturing learning environments in urban classrooms. Teacher candidates will be exposed to both theoretical and practical information, and provided with a variety of opportunities to apply their understanding with groups of students, including those with special needs, in order to learn how to sustain student interest, cooperation, and engagement in learning activities.

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(3.0)
EDU 333PT
Inclusive Teaching Methods for Elementary Classrooms [Lecture]

This course provides students with research validated strategies for the design and delivery of lessons appropriate for all students, including those with disabilities and those with exceptional capabilities. Students will examine the critical elements of effective learning experiences, apply those elements as they design lessons, deliver the lessons and reflect on the effectiveness of the lessons. 25 OPE hours are associated with this course.

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(3.0)
EDU 335
Curriculum, Instruction and Assesment II [Lecture]

This is the second in a two course sequence designed to help students develop and apply the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to integrate the tools of assessment and curriculum to maximize student learning outcomes through effective instruction for all learners. The course will explore and extend students’ understanding of a variety of concepts, practices, and principles related to the alignment of curriculum development, instruction, and assessment as a cyclical and integrated approach to effective teaching. Prerequisite: EDU 235. Taken by all Early Childhood/Special Education and Childhood/Special Education majors

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(3.0)
EDU 340PT
School, Family & Community Collaboration [Lecture]

This course emphasizes developing effective communication strategies to use with people in educational settings, including parents, students with disabilities, support personnel and other staff. Collaboration is essential to being able to work in today's school. The course develops the skill necessary to serve in a consulting capacity to the regular classroom teacher working with students with disabilities. Students will examine the different roles and functions of the special education teacher. This course will serve as a seminar to student teaching and therefore will incorporate reflective practice as a central task. Students will attend the seminar in conjunction with their student teaching and have the opportunity to share their narratives from within the classroom. During student teaching, students will work with real families and learn firsthand what it is like to have a child with a disability. Students will develop a collaborative style of teaching and work side by side parents to best serve the needs of all students.

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(3.0)
EDU 353
Literacy in Early Childhood Classrooms [Lecture]

This course will focus on the language and literacy learning of children from birth to second grade. Students will explore instructional strategies, developmentally appropriate materials and activities, and ways to support the families of the children in their care. Topics will include mapping cognitive and language development stages, assessing students’ progress, and creating effective literacy lessons which meet the needs of all students. Additionally, students will learn to modify and adapt instruction for ELL learners and children with developmental delays. The importance of early intervention will be examined. Prerequisites: EDU 235, 255, and admission to the Teacher Education Program. To be taken concurrently with EDU 353 OPE. Taken by Early Childhood/Special Education majors. Offered once/year.

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(0.0)
EDU 353
Literacy in Early Childhood Classrooms [OPE]

(25 hours school-based field experience) Students will observe and participate in early childhood classrooms. Students will be given the opportunity to engage in literacy instruction and assessment. To be taken concurrently with EDU 353. Taken by Childhood and Special Education majors. Offered once/year.

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(3.0)
EDU 355
Literacy in Childhood Classrooms [Lecture]

This course focuses on developing an understanding of the reading and writing continuum and learning the best practices for supporting students' growth once they have begun to read. The course will examine the skills of the fluent reader, the connection between reading and writing, differentiated literacy instruction, reading nonfiction, and appropriate assessment tools. Students will be expected to plan lessons based on what is learned in class and from the assigned readings. Prerequisites: EDU 235, 255, and admission to the Teacher Education Program. To be taken concurrently with EDU 355 OPE. Taken by Childhood and Special Education majors. Offered once/year.

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(0.0)
EDU 355
Literacy in Childhood Classrooms [OPE]

(25 hours school-based field experience) Students will observe and participate in elementary classrooms. Students will be given the opportunity to engage in literacy instruction and assessment. To be taken concurrently with EDU 355. Taken by Childhood and Special Education majors. Offered once/year.

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(3.0)
EDU 357
Literacy in Adolescent Classrooms [Lecture]

This course is designed for students who are planning to teach in a specific content area at the middle or high school level. It will address the complex nature of reading and writing fluently and the literacy skills students need to be successful in content area classes. Teaching strategies to enhance students’ comprehension will be explored. The role content area teachers must take in supporting their students reading will be addressed and instructional strategies for supporting adolescent readers will be investigated. Prerequisites: EDU 235 and admission to the Teacher Education Program. To be taken concurrently with EDU 357 OPE. Taken by all Adolescent Education majors. Offered once/year.

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(0.0)
EDU 357
Literacy in Adolescent Classrooms [OPE]

(25 hours school-based field experience) Students will observe and participate in middle and high school classrooms. Students will be given the opportunity to engage in literacy instruction and assessment. Prerequisite: EDU 235. To be taken concurrently with EDU 357. Taken by all Adolescent Education majors. Offered once/year.

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(3.0)
EDU 358
Language & Literacy for English Language Learners I [Lecture]

This course provides foundational knowledge in teaching the literacy skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing to English language learners as well as native English speakers in early childhood and childhood learning environments. Students will learn to identify strategies and modify resources to meet the varying needs of language learners, particularly language learners with special needs. Throughout the course, attention will be given to how teachers can support students in continuing development of their first language and culture while also providing the tools they will need to be successful in English dominant learning environments. Prerequisites: EDU 235, EDU 255, and admission to the Teacher Education Program for education majors. Taken concurrently with EDU 358 OPE.

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(0.0)
EDU 358
Language & Literacy for English Language Learners I [OPE]

(25 hours school-based field experience) Students will observe ESOL teachers and participate in ESOL classrooms. To be taken concurrently with EDU 358.

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(3.0)
EDU 359
Language & Literacy for English Language Learners II [Lecture]

This course provides foundational knowledge in literacy instruction for ELLs in secondary settings, with special emphasis on modifying resources to meet the varying needs of language learners in content and language instruction, particularly language learners with special needs. Special care is given to support students in continuing development of their first language and culture while providing the tools to be successful in English dominant learning environments. Prerequisites: EDU 235, EDU 255, and admission to the Teacher Education Program for education majors. Taken concurrently with EDU 359 OPE.

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(0.0)
EDU 359
Language & Literacy for English Language Learners II [OPE]

(25 hours school-based field experience) Students will observe ESOL teachers and participate in ESOL classrooms. To be taken concurrently with EDU 359.

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(3.0)
EDU 360
Creating Inclusive Learning Communities [Lecture]

This course prepares students to create a mutually respectful, safe and supportive learning environment that is inclusive of all students. Students will learn strategies for creating classroom communities focused on learning, including ways to maximize students’ active engagement, promote student motivation, and foster a climate of respect and appreciation for diversity. Students will also learn strategies for supporting students with disabilities in general education settings. Although focused on positive behavior and prevention, appropriate interventions to address student misbehavior will also be addressed. Students will create a classroom behavior management plan. Prerequisites: EDU 235.To be taken concurrently with EDU 360 OPE. Taken by Early Childhood/Special Education, Childhood/Special Education, K-12 Art Education, and all Adolescent Education majors.

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(0.0)
EDU 360
Creating Inclusive Learning Communities [OPE]

(25 hours school-based field experience) Students will observe and participate in instructional and behavior management processes in local school classrooms. To be taken concurrently with EDU 360. Taken by Early Childhood/Special Education, Childhood/Special Education, K-12 Art Education, and all Adolescent Education majors.

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(3.0)
EDU 365
Assessment for Special Education [Lecture]

This course emphasizes assessment as a multi-faceted tool for special educators. Students will investigate IEP procedures (screening, prereferral interventions, eligibility determinations, and classification based upon assessment data). Students will develop the ability to make instructional decisions based upon norm-referenced, criterion-referenced, and informal/formal classroom assessments. Students will learn how to utilize curricular and assessment models to develop alternate assessments. These include authentic assessments, growth-based assessments, performance-based assessments and portfolios. Students will also increase understanding of contemporary issues and practices, including: Response to Intervention (RTI); Functional Behavioral Assessment (FBA); culturally responsive assessment ; and testing accommodations. Prerequisite: EDU 235. Taken by Early Childhood/Special Education, Childhood/Special Education, and Adolescent Education/ 7-12 Special Education Generalist majors. To be taken concurrently with EDU 365 OPE by Adolescent Education/ 7-12 Special Education Generalist majors.

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(3.0)
EDU 372
Early Childhood Curriculum (Birth to K) [Lecture]

This course includes an overview of growth and development of young children from birth to 5 with an emphasis on formulating developmentally appropriate practices, including the importance of play and collaboration with families and caregivers. Topics include models of early childhood education, observation, evaluation, working with community agencies, and the New York State Common Core Learning Standards for inclusive Pre-K classrooms. Prerequisite: EDU 235, and admission to the Teacher Education Program. To be taken concurrently with EDU 372 OPE. Can be taken before or after, but not concurrently with EDU 372 or EDU 374. Taken by Early Childhood/Special Education majors. Offered once/year.

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(0.0)
EDU 372
Early Childhood Curriculum (Birth to K) [OPE]

(25 hours school-based field experience) Students will observe and participate in early childhood classrooms. To be taken concurrently with EDU 372. Taken by Early Childhood/Special Education majors. Offered once/year.

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(3.0)
EDU 373
Elementary Curriculum & Methods (Grades 1-3) [Lecture]

This course includes instruction in the New York State Common Core Learning Standards, goals, and content of the elementary school curriculum including English language arts, mathematics, science, social studies, fine arts, health, and technology, Grades 1-3; and inclusive, developmentally appropriate methods for teaching the curriculum. This course also addresses various aspects of the teaching-learning process, and the preparation and use of instructional materials. Students will develop lesson and unit plans, teach a lesson, and engage in reflective practice about their teaching. Prerequisite: EDU 235, and admission to the Teacher Education Program. To be taken concurrently with EDU 373 OPE. Can be taken before or after, but not concurrently with EDU 372 or EDU 374. Taken by Early Childhood/Special Education and Childhood/Special Education majors.

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(0.0)
EDU 373
Elementary Curriculum & Methods (Grades 1-3) [OPE]

(25 hours school-based field experience) Students will observe and participate in grades 1-3 classrooms. To be taken concurrently with EDU 373. Taken by Early Childhood/Special Education majors and Childhood/Special Education majors.

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(3.0)
EDU 374
Elementary Curriculum & Methods (Grades 4-6) [Lecture]

This course includes instruction in the New York State Common Core Learning Standards, goals, and content of the elementary school curriculum including English language arts, mathematics, science, social studies, fine arts, health, and technology, Grades 4-6; and inclusive, developmentally appropriate methods for teaching the curriculum. This course also addresses various aspects of the teaching-learning process, and the preparation and use of instructional materials. Students will develop lesson and unit plans, teach a lesson, and engage in reflective practice about their teaching. Prerequisite: EDU 235, and admission to the Teacher Education Program. To be taken concurrently with EDU 374 OPE. Can be taken before or after, but not concurrently with, EDU 372 or EDU 373. Taken by Childhood/Special Education majors. Ofered once/year.

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(0.0)
EDU 374
Elementary Curriculum & Methods (Grades 4-6) [OPE]

(25 hours school-based field experience) Students will observe and participate in grades 4-6 classrooms. To be taken concurrently with EDU 374. Taken by Childhood/Special Education majors. Offered once/year.

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(3.0)
EDU 382
Methods of Instruction & Assessment for ESOL [Lecture]

This course provides foundational knowledge into theories of language and cultural acquisition and development while learning evidence-based practices and strategies for planning, implementing, and assessing English language and content-area instruction. Special attention is given to how teachers can support their students in continuing the development of their first language and culture while providing them with tools to be successful in English dominant learning environments. Issues in the assessment of English language learners, including the identification of ELLs with disabilities, are addressed. Prerequisites: EDU 235 and admission to the Teacher Education Program for education majors. Taken concurrently with EDU 382 OPE.

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(0.0)
EDU 382
Methods of Instruction & Assessment for ESOL [OPE]

(25 hours school-based field experience) Students will observe ESOL teachers and participate in ESOL classrooms. To be taken concurrently with EDU 382. Taken by ESOL majors.

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(3.0)
EDU 385
Secondary Content Methods [Lecture]

This course focuses on the pedagogical content knowledge Adolescent Education majors need to be effective secondary teachers within in their academic subject area. Attention is given to developmentally appropriate practices that will engage and challenge all students to meet or exceed the New York State Common Core Learning Standards. Students will develop lesson and unit plans, teach a lesson, and engage in reflective practice about their teaching. The course is team taught by faculty with expertise in curriculum and instruction, special education, and various academic disciplines. Prerequisite: EDU 235, and admission to the Teacher Education Program. To be taken concurrently with EDU 385 Secondary Content Methods OPE. Taken by all Adolescent Education majors. Open only to juniors and seniors.

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(0.0)
EDU 385
Secondary Content Methods [OPE]

(25-50 hours school-based field experience) Students will observe and participate in middle and high school classrooms. Students will be expected to prepare and deliver a lesson in their content area appropriate for the particular students and curriculum being observed. To be taken concurrently with EDU 385. Taken by Adolescent Education majors.

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(3.0)
EDU 385PT
Specialized Secondary Teaching Methods [Lecture]

The secondary methods course includes instruction in the goals and content of the secondary school curriculum, various aspects of the teaching-learning process, and the preparation and use of instructional materials. The first part of the course prepares students to do the lesson planning, instruction, and assessment required for the edTPA that students must pass for NYS certification. Students will prepare lesson plans and unit plans in their content area, creating instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners, including implementation of IEPs. Students pursuing SWD 7-12 Generalist certification without a content area will focus on teaching students with disabilities across the secondary curriculum. In the second part of the course, students will work with specialists in their content area or special education to ensure that they have mastered necessary content knowledge and content pedagogical knowledge.

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(3.0)
EDU 390
Collaboration for Learning [Lecture]

This is the third in a sequence of courses that prepares students to be effective teachers for all students across the continuum of educational settings. The course emphasizes the value and importance of collaborative and collegial partnerships with families, other teachers, related service provides, paraprofessionals, and others. Students will develop effective coping strategies and problem resolution skills related to contemporary demands of public education. Students will improve their ability to write and implement standards-based Individualized Education Programs (IEPs). Prerequisite: EDU 365. Taken by Early Childhood/Special Education, Childhood/Special Education, and Adolescent Education/7-12 Special Education Generalist majors. Open only to juniors and seniors.

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(2.0)
EDU 394
Culturally Responsive Teaching [Lecture]

This course is designed to engage students in an in-depth exploration of the challenges and opportunities facing teachers in today’s diverse classrooms. Students will examine what it means to be culturally competent, the characteristics of effective multicultural teachers, education in urban contexts, and efforts to overcome the achievement gap. Students will be asked to think critically about the cultural lenses they bring to teaching, as well as contemporary issues and controversies in the broad field of multicultural education. The focus will be on developing the knowledge, skills and dispositions required for teaching that both affirms the value of human differences and maximizes learning for all students. Prerequisites: PSY 203, EDU 335. To be taken concurrently with EDU 395 OPE. Taken by Early Childhood/Special Education majors and Childhood/Special Education majors. Open only to juniors and seniors.

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(0.0)
EDU 394
Culturally Responsive Teaching [OPE]

(25 hours school-based field experience) Students will observe and participate in preschool and elementary classrooms in schools designated by NYS as high-need schools, including urban schools. To be taken concurrently with EDU 395. Taken by Early Childhood/Special Education majors and Childhood/Special Education majors. Open only to juniors and seniors.

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(6.0)
EDU 400A
Early Childhood Education Student Teaching A [Practicum]

One semester during the senior year is devoted to the actual teaching process. The student spends the semester in schools observing, participating, and teaching under the direction of a master teacher. The student teacher is required to engage in self-appraisal while receiving frequent and regular appraisals from the master teacher and the college supervisor. This course is the first in a two course placement. Prerequisites: all EDU courses with required grade achieved, minimum of 2.70 GPA, and all OPE hours completed. Students take EDU 440 concurrently with EDU 400A and B. Application deadlines for student teaching: January 15 (for fall semester) and September 1 (for spring semester).

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(6.0)
EDU 400B
Early Childhood Education Student Teaching B [Practicum]

One semester during the senior year is devoted to the actual teaching process. The student spends the semester in schools observing, participating, and teaching under the direction of a master teacher. The student teacher is required to engage in self-appraisal while receiving frequent and regular appraisals from the master teacher and the college supervisor. This course is the second in a two course placement. Prerequisites: all EDU courses with required grade achieved, minimum of 2.70 GPA, and all OPE hours completed. Students take EDU 440 concurrently with EDU 400A and B. Application deadlines for student teaching: January 15 (for fall semester) and September 1 (for spring semester).

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(6.0)
EDU 401A
Elementary Student Teaching A [Practicum]

One semester during the senior year is devoted to the actual teaching process. The student spends the semester in schools observing, participating, and teaching under the direction of a master teacher. The student teacher is required to engage in self-appraisal while receiving frequent and regular appraisals from the master teacher and the College supervisor. This course is the first in a two course placement. Prerequisites: all EDU courses with required grade achieved, minimum of 2.70 GPA, and all OPE hours completed. Students take EDU 441 concurrently with EDU 401 A and B. Application deadlines for student teaching: January 15 (for fall semester) and September 1 (for spring semester).

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(1.5)
EDU 401APT
Childhood/Students with Disabilities Student Teaching [Practicum]

The final module is dedicated to the teaching process. The student spends the semester in schools observing, assisting, and teaching under the direction of a master teacher. The student teacher is required to engage in self-appraisal while receiving frequent and regular appraisals from the master teacher and the College supervisor. The student will attend weekly meetings of student teaching seminars Module 13 School and Community Collaboration and Module 14 Teaching in Diverse Urban Classrooms during student teaching. Student teachers will complete two (2) placements totaling 60 days - one at the 1st-3rd grade level, and the other at the 4th-6th grade level. One of the placements will be in a Students with Disabilities self -contained or inclusive setting.

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(6.0)
EDU 401B
Elementary Student Teaching B [Practicum]

One semester during the senior year is devoted to the actual teaching process. The student spends the semester in schools observing, participating, and teaching under the direction of a master teacher. The student teacher is required to engage in self-appraisal while receiving frequent and regular appraisals from the master teacher and the College supervisor. This course is the second in a two course placement. Prerequisites: all EDU courses with required grade achieved, minimum of 2.70 GPA, and all OPE hours completed. Students take EDU 441 concurrently with EDU 401 A and B. Application deadlines for student teaching: January 15 (for fall semester) and September 1(for spring semester).

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(1.5)
EDU 401BPT
Elementary Student Teaching [Practicum]

The final module is dedicated to the teaching process. The student spends the semester in schools observing, assisting, and teaching under the direction of a master teacher. The student teacher is required to engage in self-appraisal while receiving frequent and regular appraisals from the master teacher and the College supervisor. The student will attend weekly meetings of student teaching seminars Module 13 School and Community Collaboration and Module 14 Teaching in Diverse Urban Classrooms during student teaching. Student teachers will complete two (2) placements totaling 60 days - one at the 1st-3rd grade level, and the other at the 4th-6th grade level. One of the placements will be in a Students with Disabilities self-contained or inclusive setting.

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(6.0)
EDU 402A
Adolescence Education Student Teaching A [Practicum]

One semester during the senior year is devoted to the actual teaching process. The student spends the semester in schools observing, assisting, and teaching under the direction of a master teacher. The student teacher is required to engage in self-appraisal while receiving frequent and regular appraisals from the master teacher and the College supervisor. This course is the first in a two course placement. Prerequisites: all EDU courses with required grade achieved, minimum of 2.70 GPA, and all OPE hours completed. Students take EDU 442 concurrently with EDU 402 A and B. Application deadlines for student teaching: January 15 (for fall semester) and September 1 (for spring semester).

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(1.5)
EDU 402APT
Second Student Teaching A [Practicum]

The final module is dedicated to the teaching process. The student spends the semester in schools observing, assisting, and teaching under the direction of a master teacher. The student teacher is required to engage in self-appraisal while receiving frequent and regular appraisals from the master teacher and the College supervisor. The student will attend weekly meetings of student teaching seminars Module 13 School and Community Collaboration and Module 14 Teaching in Diverse Urban Classrooms during student teaching. Student teachers will complete two placements totaling 60 days- one at the 7th-9th grade level, and the other at the 10th-12th grade level. One of the placements will be in a Students with Disabilities self -contained or inclusive setting.

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(6.0)
EDU 402B
Adolescence Education Student Teaching B [Practicum]

One semester during the senior year is devoted to the actual teaching process. The student spends the semester in schools observing, assisting, and teaching under the direction of a master teacher. The student teacher is required to engage in self-appraisal while receiving frequent and regular appraisals from the master teacher and the College supervisor. This course is the second in a two course placement. Prerequisites: all EDU courses with required grade achieved, minimum of 2.70 GPA, and all OPE hours completed. Students take EDU 442 concurrently with EDU 402 A and B. Application deadlines for student teaching: January 15 (for fall semester) and September 1 (for spring semester).

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(1.5)
EDU 402BPT
Secondary Student Teaching B [Practicum]

The final module is dedicated to the teaching process. The student spends the semester in schools observing, assisting, and teaching under the direction of a master teacher. The student teacher is required to engage in self-appraisal while receiving frequent and regular appraisals from the master teacher and the College supervisor. The student will attend weekly meetings of student teaching seminars Module 13 School and Community Collaboration and Module 14 Teaching in Diverse Urban Classrooms during student teaching. Student teachers will complete two placements totaling 60 days- one at the 7th-9th grade level, and the other at the 10th-12th grade level. One of the placements will be in a Students with Disabilities self -contained or inclusive setting.

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(5.0)
EDU 403A
Music Student Teaching I [Practicum]

One semester during the senior year is devoted to the actual teaching process. The student spends the semester in schools observing, assisting, and teaching under the direction of a master teacher. The student teacher is required to engage in self-appraisal while receiving frequent and regular appraisals from the master teacher and the college supervisor. This course is the first in a two course placement. Prerequisites: all EDU courses with required grade achieved, minimum of 2.70 GPA, and all OPE hours completed. Application deadlines for student teaching: January 15 (for fall semester) and September 1 (for spring semester).

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(5.0)
EDU 403B
Music Student Teaching II [Practicum]

One semester during the senior year is devoted to the actual teaching process. The student spends the semester in schools observing, assisting, and teaching under the direction of a master teacher. The student teacher is required to engage in self-appraisal while receiving frequent and regular appraisals from the master teacher and the college supervisor. This course is the second in a two course placement. Prerequisites: all EDU courses with required grade achieved, minimum of 2.70 GPA, and all OPE hours completed. Application deadlines for student teaching: January 15 (for fall semester) and September 1 (for spring semester).

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(6.0)
EDU 404A
Art Student Teaching I [Practicum]

One semester during the senior year is devoted to the actual teaching process. The student spends the semester in schools observing, assisting, and teaching under the direction of a master teacher. The student teacher is required to engage in self-appraisal while receiving frequent and regular appraisals from the master teacher and the college supervisor. This course is the first in a two course placement. Prerequisites: all EDU courses with required grade achieved, minimum of 2.70 GPA, and all OPE hours completed. Application deadlines for student teaching: January 15 (for fall semester) and September 1 (for spring semester).

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(6.0)
EDU 404B
Art Student Teaching II [Practicum]

One semester during the senior year is devoted to the actual teaching process. The student spends the semester in schools observing, assisting, and teaching under the direction of a master teacher. The student teacher is required to engage in self-appraisal while receiving frequent and regular appraisals from the master teacher and the college supervisor. This course is the second in a two course placement. Prerequisites: all EDU courses with required grade achieved, minimum of 2.70 GPA, and all OPE hours completed. Application deadlines for student teaching: January 15 (for fall semester) and September 1 (for spring semester).

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(6.0)
EDU 405A
Physical Education Student Teaching I [Practicum]

One semester during the senior year is devoted to the actual teaching process. The student spends the semester in schools observing, assisting, and teaching under the direction of a master teacher. The student teacher is required to engage in self-appraisal while receiving frequent and regular appraisals from the master teacher and the college supervisor. Prerequisites: all EDU and PPE courses with required grade achieved, minimum of 2.70 GPA, and all OPE hours completed. Application deadlines for student teaching: January 15 (for fall semester) and September 1 (for spring semester).

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(6.0)
EDU 405B
Physical Education Student Teaching II [Practicum]

One semester during the senior year is devoted to the actual teaching process. The student spends the semester in schools observing, assisting, and teaching under the direction of a master teacher. The student teacher is required to engage in self-appraisal while receiving frequent and regular appraisals from the master teacher and the college supervisor. Prerequisites: all EDU and PPE courses with required grade achieved, minimum of 2.70 GPA, and all OPE hours completed. Application deadlines for student teaching: January 15 (for fall semester) and September 1 (for spring semester).

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(6.0)
EDU 406A
ESOL Student Teaching I [Practicum]

One semester during the senior year is devoted to the actual teaching process. The student spends the semester in schools observing, participating, and teaching under the direction of a master teacher. The student teacher is required to engage in self-appraisal while receiving frequent and regular appraisals from the master teacher and the College supervisor. This course is the first in a two course placement. Prerequisites: successful completion of all required EDU courses (earning minimum grade); overall GPA of 2.70 or better; successful completion of all OPE hours; and demonstration of Technical Standards approved by the Teacher Education Department. Students take EDU 446 concurrently with EDU 406 A and EDU 406B. Application deadlines for student teaching: January 15 (for fall semester) and September 1 (for spring semester).

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(6.0)
EDU 406B
ESOL Student Teaching II [Practicum]

One semester during the senior year is devoted to the actual teaching process. The student spends the semester in schools observing, participating, and teaching under the direction of a master teacher. The student teacher is required to engage in self-appraisal while receiving frequent and regular appraisals from the master teacher and the College supervisor. This course is the second in a two course placement. Prerequisites: successful completion of all required EDU courses (earning minimum grade); overall GPA of 2.70 or better; successful completion of all OPE hours; and demonstration of Technical Standards approved by the Teacher Education Department. Students take EDU 446 concurrently with EDU 406 A and B. Application deadlines for student teaching: January 15 (for fall semester) and September 1 (for spring semester).

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(3.0)
EDU 421
Contemporary Issues in Art Education Methods [Lecture and Laboratory]

This course analyzes current prospective instructional trends in art education. Course objectives focus on helping students execute learning experiences, conceptualized around the national standards of art education. This course presents instructional knowledge and techniques to integrate discursive views on art education while making educated instructional decisions in devising culturally responsive instruction. Also listed as ART 421. Prerequisites: ART 318 and 319 with a minimum grade of B- in each course.

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(2.0)
EDU 440
Early Childhood Education Student Teaching Seminar [Lecture]

This capstone experience is taken concurrently with student teaching. The students will debrief and process their student teaching experiences. Attention will be given to classroom management issues, to schools as organizations, and to hiring and interviewing processes. Taken by Early Childhood/Students with Disabilities majors concurrently with Student Teaching EDU 400.

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(3.0)
EDU 440PT
Teaching in Diverse Urban Classrooms - Race, Class, Gender, Language and Religion [Lecture]

This course will provide teacher candidates with the background knowledge required to develop the skills and dispositions necessary to meet the educational, social and emotional needs of diverse students. This course will explore the influence and impact of five aspects of human diversity on teaching and learning in the urban setting, including: race and ethnicity, social class, gender and sexual orientation, language, and religion. Teacher candidates will be introduced to the history, theory and practice that informs effective teaching with students in a pluralistic society. The goal of this course is to help candidates understand various aspects of human diversity as interrelated and interactive - not as isolated variables - and to better understand the ways in which their identities effect their practice as teachers. This course serves as the required seminar to student teaching. Students will meet and connect to the class community through their student teaching experiences. Student will utilize reflective practice as a means to express their teaching narratives. The course content will bridge the essential components found in teaching in the diverse urban classroom. Students will be expected to respond to course work from the lens of the student teacher

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(2.0)
EDU 441
Childhood Education Student Teaching Seminar [Lecture]

This capstone experience is taken concurrently with student teaching. The students will debrief and process their student teaching experiences. Attention will be given to classroom management issues, to schools as organizations, and to hiring and interviewing processes. Taken concurrently with Student Teaching EDU 401.

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(2.0)
EDU 442
Adolescence Education Student Teaching Seminar [Lecture]

This capstone experience is taken concurrently with student teaching. The students will debrief and process their student teaching experiences. Attention will be given to classroom management issues, to schools as organizations, and to hiring and interviewing processes. Taken by Adolescence Education majors concurrently with Student Teaching EDU 402.

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(2.0)
EDU 446
ESOL Student Teaching Seminar [Lecture]

This seminar is taken concurrently with student teaching. Students will increase their understanding of teaching and learning and enhance their skills through shared reflection on their classroom experiences. Attention will be given to specific topics, such as classroom management, learning standards and assessments, school organizations, and hiring and interviewing processes, in response to students' experiences and needs. Students will also complete professional portfolios suitable for presentation to potential employers. Taken by ESOL majors concurrently with Student Teaching EDU 406A and 406B.

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(1.0-3.0)
EDU 495
Independent Study in Education [Independent Study]

Independent study provides opportunity to pursue advanced or special-interest topics not covered in the curriculum. Prerequisites: 1. Junior standing. 2. A minimum of 9 semester hours in the discipline of the Independent Study. 3. A minimum grade point average of 2.50 in the discipline. 4. Proof of motivation and ability to work independently. 5. Approval of the department in which the study is to be taken. 6. Permission from the student's advisor, the course instructor, the Department Chair, the Academic Dean, and the Registrar.

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(1.0-3.0)
EDU 498
Undergraduate Research [Independent Study]

Students conduct laboratory research in education under supervision of a faculty member. Permission of instructor is required. Guidelines for Independent Study apply. A written report is required. (May be repeated with new research.) Prerequisites: 1. Junior standing. 2. A minimum of 9 semester hours in the discipline of the Independent Study. 3. A minimum grade point average of 2.50 in the discipline. 4. Proof of motivation and ability to work independently. 5. Approval of the division in which the study is to be taken. 6. Permission from the student's advisor, the course instructor, the Division Chair, and the Registrar.

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(3.0)
EDUC 5017
Student Teaching Primary [Practicum]

Incorporates a supervised student teaching experience that allows the student to work in a childhood setting under the supervision of a teacher holding the appropriate certification and supervised by a RWC faculty member. Candidates participate in planning and teaching with increasing responsibility. In the accompanying weekly seminar, student teachers engage in reflective, self-evaluative discussion of teaching experiences. This constitutes half of the student teaching requirement and is a 20 day setting in grades 1-3.

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(3.0)
EDUC 5018
Student Teaching Intermediate [Practicum]

Incorporates a supervised student teaching experience that allows the student to work in a childhood setting under the supervision of a teacher holding the appropriate certification and supervised by a RWC faculty member. Candidates participate in planning and teaching with increasing responsibility. In the accompanying weekly seminar, student teachers engage in reflective, self-evaluative discussion of teaching experiences. This constitutes half of the student teaching requirement and is a 20 day setting in grades 4-6.

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(3.0)
EDUC 5210
Planning, Instruction & Assessment [Lecture]

This course provides an integrated introduction to the processes by which teachers plan and deliver instruction, and assess student learning in inclusive classroom settings. Students will learn to create lesson and unit plans, identify and use a variety of teaching strategies, monitor and adjust during instruction, and use both informal and formal assessments. Students will learn multiple ways to use technology to enhance teaching and learning. Students will also learn the importance of adapting instruction to meet students’ learning differences and aligning instruction with the NYS Common Core Learning Standards.

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(3.0)
EDUC 5212
Student Behavior & Learning Environments [Lecture]

Explores classroom management and how to adapt various classroom configurations to be more effective for learners with and without disabilities. Includes co-teaching models; system-wide efforts to prevent violence and disruption; the self-contained classroom; and push-in, pull-out models. Features functional behavior assessment. Following their introduction to action research (see "Preparation for Research") students consider various research designs to support the evaluation of new approaches to managing the learning environment; students then collaborate on the design of an action research project focused on a management approach they find in the professional literature. OPE is a required component of this course.

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(3.0)
EDUC 5214
Language & Literacy I [Lecture]

Introduces language acquisition and emergent literacy for native English speakers as well as for English language learners (ELL). Focuses on pre-literate behaviors, emergent literacy, and literacy through grade two. Includes ELA standards, methods, and assessments, and the use of technology in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Teaches students how to differentiate classroom instruction. Students gather data about learning-to-read and perform semantic analysis on the data. OPE is a required component of this course.

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(3.0)
EDUC 5215
Research I:Literature Review [Lecture]

Students expand the reading on their topic to encompass 25 relevant, current sources, the majority from the research literature. Students prepare a synthesis of the literature, relative to their planned project or study. Major deliverables are Chapter 1 (Rationale) and Chapter 2 (Literature Review) for the M.Ed. Thesis or Curriculum Project.

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(3.0)
EDUC 5216
Social Foundations of Education [Lecture]

Expands the student's understanding of motivation and management of the learning environment by looking beyond the classroom to the social and cultural context of education. Considers the impact of poverty, race, class, and gender; formation of character; culturally-sensitive teaching; involvement of parents and community; collaboration with school and community; cultural diversity; beliefs and norms. Considers the role of the CSE and instructional support teams in the broader context of the community. Includes models of collaboration used in working with families and with other professionals. Addresses the historical development and current status of schools in the US, with particular attention to the development of urban education systems. Introduces and critiques school law and funding structures. Attention is given to the evolving role of schools as institutions, the role of education in a democratic society, ethics in the context of education, and the meaning and importance of citizenship. OPE is a required component of this course.

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(3.0)
EDUC 5217
Assessment in Inclusive Classrooms [Lecture]

Expands the student's knowledge of Assessment through diagnostic-prescriptive teaching. Provides the skills and opportunities to assess a child with special needs and then plan effective educational activities at the appropriate level and in the appropriate sequence in all content areas found in the inclusive classroom. OPE is a required component of this course.

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(3.0)
EDUC 5218
Language & Literacy II [Lecture]

Provides continued insights into the teaching of reading. Includes the use of direct instruction, holistic approaches as well as literature-based approaches for use with all learners including ELL. Attention is paid to content-area reading and instructional strategies, including writing and listening to learn. Presents technology to enhance the acquisition and development of reading and writing skills. OPE is a required component of this course.

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(3.0)
EDUC 5219
Differentiated Instruction for All Learners [Lecture]

This course builds on the introduction provided in EDUC 52XX. Students learn how to develop learning objectives and lesson plans based on principles of effective teaching including Differentiated Instruction, Universal Design for Learning (UDL), Madeline Hunter Model, Bloom’s Taxonomy (revised), Multiple Intelligences, and other research-validated instructional practices for inclusive, culturally responsive classrooms. Emphasis is given to the planning of lessons aligned with the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) while considering the strengths, interests and needs of all students. This includes students with disabilities and other special needs (SWD), English Language Learners (ELLs) and diverse populations. This course introduces students to summative and formative classroom assessment in lesson planning and making effective instructional decisions to teach all students. Students read and reflect on current research in one of the main topics of the course. Prerequisite: EDUC 5210.

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(3.0)
EDUC 5220
Child and Adolescent Development and Learning [Lecture]

This course is designed to engage students in a meaningful exploration of human development and learning from prenatal experience through adolescence. Students will examine the nature of development across major domains (physical, cognitive, social-emotional, and moral), the impact of context (familial, school, community, and culture) on development, and the construction of identity. Attention will also be given to theories and processes of learning, and their implications for teaching. Throughout the course, the focus will be on using knowledge of learners and learning to develop evidence-based, developmentally appropriate teaching practices for increasingly diverse classrooms.

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(3.0)
EDUC 5221
Social Found. of Ed. for Every Student [Lecture]

This course serves as an introduction to the historical, cultural, and social foundations of education for all students in the United States. Students will examine the roots of current educational theories, policies, practices, and questions regarding the diverse and rich nature of secondary schools today. Additionally students will be presented with the role of inclusive education and the responsibilities and rights of all educators involved. Students will begin exploring current research in education. Introduces students to sources of research on inclusion and on various disabilities; students read and report on current research on a particular disability. OPE is a required component of this course.

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(3.0)
EDUC 5223
Differentiated Planning &Teaching Stratetegies [Lecture]

This course builds on the introduction provided in EDUC 5210 and prepares students to plan and deliver lesson and unit plans at the secondary level that will promote success for all learners, with special attention to differentiated instruction and assessment, teaching culturally and linguistically diverse students, and Universal Design for Instruction (UDI) in an inclusive classroom. The course also addresses principles and strategies for assessing student learning, including criterion-referenced tests, portfolios, standardized tests and other forms of summative and formative classroom assessments. Emphasis is given to aligning instruction with the Common Core and other discipline specific learning standards and responding appropriately to the strengths, needs, and developmental levels of every student. Students read and reflect on current research in one of the main topics of the course. OPE is a required component of this course. Prerequisite: EDUC 5210.

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(3.0)
EDUC 5224
Instructional & Adaptive Technology [Lecture]

This course explores instructional technology as a tool to facilitate learning for all students. Students will explore the use of technology as "mind tools" to stimulate and engage student interest and participation in learning; students also consider the use of technology and adaptive technology to scaffold learning for all students. The class features hands-on with hardware, software, and networks that are typical in today's schools, including Smart boards, cameras, data projectors, office packages, content-specific software, web-based inquiry and collaborative multimedia projects. Students will consider issues and opportunities with emerging technologies, with an emphasis on media literacy and opportunities to further literacy with technology. Using research methods they have learned, students gather data and analyze results to further their understanding of technology impact. OPE is a required component of this course.

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(3.0)
EDUC 5225
Research I: Literature Review [Lecture]

Students expand the reading on their topic to encompass 25 relevant, current sources, the majority from the research literature. Students prepare a synthesis of the literature, relative to their planned project or study. Major deliverables are Chapter 1 (Rationale) and Chapter 2 (Literature Review) for the M.Ed. Thesis or Curriculum Project.

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(3.0)
EDUC 5227
Assessment for Student Learning [Lecture]

This course provides knowledge and understanding of the purposes and forms of assessment for student learning in the inclusive classroom. Students will learn diagnostic-prescriptive teaching strategies for assessment both individual and groups. Students develop and present differentiated lesson plans that address the needs of individual students. The application of knowledge gained from assessment to plan for individual student learning will be stressed. OPE is a required component of this course. Pre-requisite: EDUC 5223.

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(3.0)
EDUC 5228
Literacy Theory & Practice [Lecture]

This course explores the reading and writing process from a theoretical and practical perspective. Learning-to-read and reading-to-learn strategies will be examined so students develop a clear understanding of the purposes for reading and the problem solving strategies fluent readers use to create meaning from text. The course will address issues of second language acquisition, bilingualism, literacy enrichment, intervention with at-risk and struggling readers, and the importance of contributing to district initiatives in literacy. OPE is a required component of this course. Pre-requisite: EDUC 5224.

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(3.0)
EDUC 5230
Advanced Literacy Practicum-Childhood [Practicum]

This course gives students the opportunity to staff a summer literacy clinic, working with children and youth individually and in small groups under the direct supervision of literacy faculty to increase participants’ literacy skills of reading, writing, and speaking. Students will engage in lesson planning, instruction, and assessment of clinic students, and prepare an end-of-clinic report to parents and school district personnel about clinic participants’ literacy skills. This is an elective course for M.Ed. students pursuing childhood certification (who are eligible to work with children grades 1-6). Completion of the course gives the M.Ed. students 50 hours of OPE. Graduates of the M.Ed. in Literacy program who wish to extend their certification (from childhood to adolescent or adolescent to childhood) may take EDUC 6910 or 6912 and EDUC 5230 or EDUC 6230 to meet the 6 credit hour and practicum requirements for extension by individual evaluation.

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(3.0)
EDUC 5562
App Literacy Strat content area MS/HS [Lecture]

Practical application of content area strategies and assessments will be the focus for this course which is a follow-up to EDUC 5561. Texts used in EDUC 5561 will continue to serve as references for this course. In depth review of the seven key cognitive strategies used to effectively comprehend content area texts and materials will be studied. The implementation of best practices in the use of literacy strategies as appropriate for special education and content area classrooms will serve as a foundation for class discussions and assignments.

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(3.0)
EDUC 5566
Content Area Literacy Instruction for diverse Adolescents [Lecture]

Practical application of content area strategies and assessments will be the focus for this course which is a follow-up to EDUC 5561. Texts used in EDUC 5561 will continue to serve as references for this course. In depth review of the seven key cognitive strategies used to effectively comprehend content area texts and materials will be studied. The implementation of best practices in the use of literacy strategies as appropriate for special education and content area classrooms will serve as a foundation for class discussions and assignments.

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(0.0)
EDUC 5592
Student Teaching Practicum in Biology [Lecture]

This seminar is designed to parallel the M.Ed Adolescent Education Student Teaching Practicum required by the New York State Education Department (EDUC 5592). It will be taken concurrently with EDUC 5014 School and Society/EDUC 5590 Lecture Student Teaching Capstone Seminar

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(8.0)
EDUC 5592
Student Teaching Practicum in Biology [Practicum]

The student teaching practicum is completed in the appropriate certification area. Consists of two placements of 20 days. One placement will occur in grades 7-9, the other will occur in grades 10-12.

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(0.0)
EDUC 5593
Student Teaching Practicum in Chemistry [Lecture]

This seminar is designed to parallel the M.Ed Adolescent Education Student Teaching Practicum required by the New York State Education Department (EDUC 5593). It will be taken concurrently with EDUC 5014 School and Society/EDUC 5590 Lecture Student Teaching Capstone Seminar

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(8.0)
EDUC 5593
Student Teaching Practicum in Chemistry [Practicum]

The student teaching practicum is completed in the appropriate certification area. Consists of two placements of 20 days. One placement will occur in grades 7-9, the other will occur in grades 10-12.

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(0.0)
EDUC 5594
Student Teaching Practicum in English [Lecture]

This seminar is designed to parallel the M.Ed Adolescent Education Student Teaching Practicum required by the New York State Education Department (EDUC 5594). It will be taken concurrently with EDUC 5014 School and Society/EDUC 5590 Lecture Student Teaching Capstone Seminar

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(8.0)
EDUC 5594
Student Teaching Practicum in English [Practicum]

The student teaching practicum is completed in the appropriate certification area. Consists of two placements of 20 days. One placement will occur in grades 7-9, the other will occur in grades 10-12.

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(0.0)
EDUC 5595
Student Teaching Practicum - Mathematics [Lecture]

This seminar is designed to parallel the M.Ed Adolescent Education Student Teaching Practicum required by the New York State Education Department (EDUC 5595). It will be taken concurrently with EDUC 5014 School and Society/EDUC 5590 Lectuer Student Teaching Capstone Seminar

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(8.0)
EDUC 5595
Student Teaching Practicum - Mathematics [Practicum]

The student teaching practicum is completed in the appropriate certification area. Consists of two placements of 20 days. One placement will occur in grades 7-9, the other will occur in grades 10-12.

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(0.0)
EDUC 5596
Student Teaching Practicum in Physics [Lecture]

This seminar is designed to parallel the M.Ed Adolescent Education Student Teaching Practicum required by the New York State Education Department (EDUC 5596). It will be taken concurrently with EDUC 5014 School and Society/EDUC 5590 Lecture Student Teaching Capstone Seminar

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(8.0)
EDUC 5596
Student Teaching Practicum in Physics [Practicum]

The student teaching practicum is completed in the appropriate certification area. Consists of two placements of 20 days. One placement will occur in grades 7-9, the other will occur in grades 10-12.

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(0.0)
EDUC 5597
Student Teaching Practicum - Soc Studies [Lecture]

This seminar is designed to parallel the M.Ed Adolescent Education Student Teaching Practicum required by the New York State Education Department (EDUC 5597). It will be taken concurrently with EDUC 5014 School and Society/EDUC 5590 Lecture Student Teaching Capstone Seminar

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(8.0)
EDUC 5597
Student Teaching Practicum - Soc Studies [Practicum]

The student teaching practicum is completed in the appropriate certification area. Consists of two placements of 20 days. One placement will occur in grades 7-9, the other will occur in grades 10-12.

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(3.0)
EDUC 5901
Reading in the Content Areas-Childhood [Lecture]

This course presents skills and strategies that can be applied to reading in Science, Social Studies, and Math. The focus will be on reading to learn. Topics will include preparing students to read content area texts and trade books, comprehension of narrative and expository text, determining what is important while reading, organizing collected information, integrating reading with other subjects, and assessing student learning. Students will be expected to develop a repertoire of teaching strategies that will support students as they read to learn, as well as interventions when language-based learning difficulties arise.

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(3.0)
EDUC 5903
Assessment-driven Literacy Instruction-Childhood [Lecture]

This course will build on the students’ knowledge of assessment and investigate how the information collected can be used to make informed instructional decisions. The focus will be on using what the teacher knows about their students’ skills to choose reading materials and mini-lessons in reading. Topics will include utilizing various informal and formal assessments, the analysis of assessment data, a review of the New York State Language Arts Standards, examination of reading materials, leveling texts, matching books with students, and developing lesson plans that address student needs. Students will be expected to write lesson plans that reflect their analysis of student skills and strategies. Students are expected to fulfill a minimum of 20 hours of their literacy practicum requirements in the RWC spring Literacy Clinic. Co-requisite: EDUC 6910.

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(3.0)
EDUC 5911
Reading in the Content Areas-Adolescence [Lecture]

This course presents skills and strategies that can be applied to reading in content areas at the secondary level. The focus will be on reading to learn. Topics will include preparing students to read content area texts and trade books, comprehension of narrative and expository text, determining what is important while reading, organizing collected information, integrating reading with other subjects, and assessing student learning. Students will be expected to develop a repertoire of teaching strategies that will support students as they read to learn, as well as interventions when language-based learning difficulties arise.

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(3.0)
EDUC 5913
Assessment-driven Literacy Instruction-Adolescence [Lecture]

This course will build on the students’ knowledge of assessment and investigate how the information collected can be used to make informed instructional decisions. The focus will be on using what the teacher knows about their students’ skills to choose reading materials and mini-lessons in reading. Topics will include utilizing various informal and formal assessments, the analysis of assessment data, a review of the New York State Language Arts Standards, examination of reading materials, leveling texts, matching books with students, and developing lesson plans that address student needs. Students will be expected to write lesson plans that reflect their analysis of student skills and strategies. Students are expected to fulfill a minimum of 20 hours of their literacy practicum requirements through tutoring or clinic teaching in conjunction with this course. Co-requisite EDUC 6912.

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(3.0)
EDUC 6209
Elementary Curriculum and Methods (grades 1 -6) [Lecture]

This course includes instruction in the New York State Common Core Learning Standards, goals, and content of the elementary school curriculum including English language arts, mathematics, science, social studies, fine arts, health, and technology, Grades 1 -6; and inclusive, developmentally appropriate methods for teaching the curriculum. This course also addresses various aspects of the teaching-learning process, and the preparation and use of instructional materials. Students will develop lesson and unit plans, teach a lesson, and engage in reflective practice about their teaching.

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(3.0)
EDUC 6211
Research II: Literature Review [Lecture]

Students are guided through the completion of their M.Ed. Thesis or Curriculum Project through weekly seminars, supplemented by regular meetings with the chosen Reader.

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(2.0)
EDUC 6215
Capstone Seminar [Lecture]

This is a weekly seminar that accompanies student teaching, in which students and the lead instructor address issues that arise in student teaching through problem-solving, role-playing, and situational analysis. An important goal is relating theory to practice. In addition, the course uses the student's portfolio to set goals for growth during student teaching. At the beginning of the course and after each placement, students reflect (in writing) on their development as teachers and special educators; these student reflections become part of the student's portfolio. Students and the instructor develop a rubric to score their portfolios for excellence, using professional norms as categories. Topical instruction throughout the semester is rotated among the cohort team; topics include adapting instruction for students with disabilities; knowledge of and teaching in all content areas; managing the classroom environment; integration of technology; school law; school culture; professional ethics and demeanor; reflective practice; the portfolio; the job search. The team also consults with student-teaching supervisors to insure that each student demonstrates strength in all areas of emphasis.

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(2.0)
EDUC 6216
Student Teaching in Childhood Education [Practicum]

Incorporates a supervised student teaching experience that allows the student to work in a childhood setting under the supervision of a teacher holding the appropriate certification and supervised by a RWC faculty member. Candidates participate in planning and teaching with increasing responsibility. In the accompanying weekly seminar, student teachers engage in reflective, self-evaluative discussion of teaching experiences. This constitutes half of the student teaching requirement and is in grades 1-3.

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(2.0)
EDUC 6217
Student Teaching in Childhood Education [Practicum]

Incorporates a supervised student teaching experience that allows the student to work in a childhood setting under the supervision of a teacher holding the appropriate certification and supervised by a RWC faculty member. Candidates participate in planning and teaching with increasing responsibility. In the accompanying weekly seminar, student teachers engage in reflective, self-evaluative discussion of teaching experiences. This constitutes half of the student teaching requirement and is in grades 4-6.

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(3.0)
EDUC 6218
Student Teaching Special Education [Practicum]

One or both of the grade-level placements (EDUC 6216, EDUC 6217) also serve as the student's placement in Special Education-- either in an inclusive classroom or in a resource setting. Students participate in teaching experiences and planning. Student teachers in this role are expected to discuss various aspects of their experiences with their master teacher and college supervisor and to develop skills needed for self-reflection and self-evaluation. Whenever possible, the college supervisor for the special-education placement will be a full-time faculty who has had the student face-to-face for a SPED-related class; when this is not possible, such a faculty person will work closely with the college supervisor. Such a faculty person has awareness of the student's development as a special educator and knows the need for experience and development in particular areas. At the same time, supervising student teaching gives the faculty person an opportunity to stay current with Special Education needs, practices, issues, and personnel in area schools.

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(3.0)
EDUC 6221
Research II:Masters Thesis/Project [Lecture]

Students are guided through the completion of their M.Ed. Thesis or Curriculum Project through weekly seminars, supplemented by regular meetings with the chosen Reader.

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(3.0)
EDUC 6222
Methods of Content Instruction [Lecture]

This course focuses on instructional methods specific to the content area. The New York State Learning Standards are emphasized and used in developing a conceptual understanding of how teachers interpret required curriculum standards in their fields and use those standards to plan and implement meaningful instruction in the middle / high school classroom. Unit planning is emphasized; students are expected to develop a unit plan with accompanying lessons in their content area. Students develop and share their understanding of discipline-specific literacy with those in other disciplines. OPE is an required component of this course.

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(3.0)
EDUC 6223
Instructional Management for Productive Learning Environments [Lecture]

This course explores instructional management and how to adapt various classroom configurations to be more effective for adolescent learners. Students will research and evaluate various approaches to understanding and managing adolescent behavior. Discussion topics include bullying and system-wide efforts to prevent violence and disruption, what do the actions really mean. OPE is a required component of this course.

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(3.0)
EDUC 6224
Application of Literacy Theory [Lecture]

Students will explore in greater depth the key instructional strategies used to effectively guide all students to comprehend content area texts. Best practices in the application of various literacy strategies will be examined. Writing and reading will be examined as reciprocal processes, key to learning in the content areas. Students further explore the uses of multimedia technology in their content areas, developing ways to engage learners and scaffold learning. Additionally, visual literacy skills will be applied to content area textbooks in order to make the content subject matter more meaningful and available to all learners. OPE is a required component of this course. Prerequisites: EDUC 5224 and EDUC 5228

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(2.0)
EDUC 6225
Capstone Seminar [Lecture]

This is a weekly seminar that accompanies student teaching, in which students address issues that arise in student teaching. In addition, the course uses the student's portfolio to set goals for growth during student teaching. Topics to be considered include: adapting instruction for students with disabilities, managing a positive classroom environment, integration of technology, school law, school culture, professional ethics; reflective practice, the portfolio, and the job search.

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(2.0)
EDUC 6226
Student Teaching 7-9 [Practicum]

Incorporates a supervised student teaching experience that allows the student to work in a middle school or junior high school setting under the supervision of a teacher holding the appropriate certification and supervised by a RWC faculty member.

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(3.0)
EDUC 6227
Student Teach SPED [Practicum]

One or both of the grade-level placements (EDUC 6226, EDUC 6228) may also serve as the student's placement in Special Education-- either in an inclusive classroom or in a resource setting.

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(2.0)
EDUC 6228
Student Teaching 10-12 [Practicum]

Incorporates a supervised student teaching experience that allows the student to work in a high school setting under the supervision of a teacher holding the appropriate certification and supervised by a RWC faculty member.

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(3.0)
EDUC 6230
Advanced Literacy Practicum-Adolescence [Practicum]

This course gives students the opportunity to staff a summer literacy clinic, working with children and youth individually and in small groups under the direct supervision of literacy faculty to increase participants’ literacy skills of reading, writing, and speaking. Students will engage in lesson planning, instruction, and assessment of clinic students, and prepare an end-of-clinic report to parents and school district personnel about clinic participants’ literacy skills. This is an elective course for M.Ed. students pursuing adolescence certification in English/Language Arts (who are eligible to work with students in grades 7-12). Completion of the course gives the M.Ed. students 50 hours of OPE. Graduates of the M.Ed. in Literacy program who wish to extend their certification (from childhood to adolescent or adolescent to childhood) may take EDUC 6910 or 6912 and EDUC 5230 or EDUC 6230 to meet the 6 credit hour and practicum requirements for extension by individual evaluation.

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(3.0)
EDUC 6910
Literacy Theory-Childhood [Lecture]

This course is designed to increase students' understanding of the theories of literacy, as well as the application of theory into practice. The focus will be on the examination of literacy in terms of thought processes, skills, methodologies, materials, and assistive technology that support literacy for all learners. Topics will include balanced literacy, shared reading, guided reading, supporting comprehension, grouping, meeting individual needs, and differentiated instruction. Students will explore, develop and apply additional teaching strategies that can be used to support literacy development in the elementary grades. Students will be asked to demonstrate theory into practice by fulfilling fifteen hours of a supervised literacy practicum. Additionally, learners will revise their earlier work for anthology publication and begin preparing to present their literacy portfolio. Students will work two hours/ two days per week at a designated time and location established by Roberts Wesleyan College faculty. Students are expected to apply concepts in an individual tutoring basis. Co-requisite: EDUC 6910.

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(3.0)
EDUC 6919
Research & Theory into Practice-Childhood [Practicum]

As a culminating experience for the Master of Education in Literacy program, students engage in a pre-arranged supervised practicum experience, in an area school or reading clinic. Students will be placed in a tutorial or small group situation at their appropriate certification level. Practicum hours are directly supervised at each setting with informal and formal feedback provided. The practica are embedded in a course that requires students to apply their understanding of current research in an area of interest in literacy theory and practice. Further, students build on their literature review by planning an action research project designed to put theory into practice. For course completion, students will assess, critically diagnose, provide remediation, use formative lesson plans and engage in formal observations and write summative weekly reflections. Pre-requisite EDUC 5903.

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(3.0)
EDUC 6929
Research & Theory into Practice-Adolescence [Practicum]

As a culminating experience for the Master of Education in Literacy program, students engage in a pre-arranged supervised practicum experience, in an area school or reading clinic. Students will be placed in a tutorial or small group situation at their appropriate certification level. Practicum hours are directly supervised at each setting with informal and formal feedback provided. The practica are embedded in a course that requires students to apply their understanding of current research in an area of interest in literacy theory and practice. Further, students build on their literature review by planning an action research project designed to put theory into practice. For course completion, students will assess, critically diagnose, provide remediation, use formative lesson plans and engage in formal observations and write summative weekly reflections. Pre-requisite: EDUC 5903.

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