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Courses

NOTE:
The number in parentheses following the course title indicates the semester hours of credit assigned to the course. An H following the course number indicates an honors level course.

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PHL 202 - Philosophical and Ethical Issues [Lecture] (3.0)

In this course, students study the traditional systems of ethical decision-making, including a number of Christian perspectives, and apply what they learn to the analysis of vexing ethical and social issues in contemporary society such as abortion, affirmative action, capital punishment, cloning, constitutional freedoms, euthanasia, pacifism and just war, and extreme poverty. The goal of this course is for students to develop a familiarity with ethical argumentation, some sophistication in developing and articulating justifiable ethical perspectives, and a well-founded, internalized ethical sensibility to guide them in their lives. Business, Nursing, and Philosophy-Religion majors have their own versions of the course.

PHL 202H - Honors Philosophical and Ethical Issues [Honors Option] (3.0)

This course covers the same areas of philosophical and ethical thought as those discussed in PHL 202. Class time, however, is less structured and students have more freedom to explore issues of personal interest in innovative ways. (Offered alternate years)

PHL 208 - Critical Thinking [Lecture] (3.0)

The student develops skills for evaluating arguments through an applied study of the formal and informal components of language and reasoning. The course is preparation for a thoughtful, informed, and attentive life.

PHL 301 - Ancient and Medieval Philosophy [Lecture] (3.0)

The intent of this course is to discuss comparatively the following philosophical figures or schools: the Pre-Socratics, the Sophists, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, post-Aristotelian philosophers, Augustine, and Aquinas. (Offered alternate years)

PHL 302 - Modern Philosophy [Lecture] (3.0)

Consideration is given to Western philosophy from Bacon through the eighteenth century, with special attention to Descartes, Pascal, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. (Offered alternate years)

PHL 303 - Recent and Contemporary Philosophy [Lecture] (3.0)

This course is designed to acquaint the student with philosophical thought since the beginning of the 19th century. Emphasis is on Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, Sartre, Marx, James Moore, Russell, and Wittgenstein. (Offered alternate years)

PHL 305 - Epistemology and Religious Belief [Lecture] (3.0)

Students gain an understanding of the concepts, issues, and approaches prevalent in epistemology (the theory of knowledge) since Gettier's ground-breaking work in 1963 and apply this understanding to the particular case of religious knowledge. (Offered alternate years)

PHL 402 - Philosophy of Religion [Lecture] (3.0)

This course is a philosophical analysis of religious belief. Specifically, the student analyzes the following issues: religious language, divine omniscience, divine omnipotence, divine goodness, petitionary prayer, divine immutability, arguments for and against God's existence, and personal immortality.

PHL 404 - Topics in Philosophy [Lecture] (3.0)

This is an advanced seminar-style class that explores topics in philosophy not covered in the rest of the curriculum. (May be repeated if topic differs.) (Offered on demand)

PHL 495 - Independent Study in Philosophy [Independent Study] (2.0-3.0)

Independent study provides opportunity to pursue advanced or special-interest topics not covered in the curriculum. Prerequisites: 1. Junior standing. 2. A minimum of 9 semester hours in the discipline of the Independent Study. 3. A minimum grade point average of 2.50 in the discipline. 4. Proof of motivation and ability to work independently. 5. Approval of the department in which the study is to be taken. 6. Permission from the student's advisor, the course instructor, the Department Chair, the Academic Dean, and the Registrar.

NOTE:
The number in parentheses following the course title indicates the semester hours of credit assigned to the course. An H following the course number indicates an honors level course.

Click the course title to see details

BIB 101 - Introduction to Old Testament Literature and Theology [Lecture] (3.0)

This course explores the literature and thought of the Old Testament in its original historical setting in the ancient Near East and in the context of the entire biblical story. It introduces students to selected passages that represent the major sections of the Old Testament (Pentateuch, Historical Books, Wisdom Literature, Prophetic Literature) while articulating the overarching narrative coherence of the Old Testament as part of the larger story of God's purposes for the world that the entire Bible recounts.

BIB 101H - Honors Introduction to Old Testament Literature and Theology [Honors Option] (3.0)

This survey of the history, literature, and theology of the Old Testament also addresses the use and interpretation of influential Old Testament passages by later readers. Special attention is given to current scholarship and emerging issues, as well as to student interests.

BIB 102 - Introduction to New Testament Literature and Theology [Lecture] (3.0)

This is a survey of the New Testament Scriptures. This course provides the student with an overview of the biblical and theological foundation upon which Roberts Wesleyan College has been established. The curriculum overviews each of the New Testament books while researching the authors and the literary, sociological, and theological setting with a view toward contemporary application.

BIB 200 - Introduction to Biblical Exegesis and Research [Lecture] (1.0)

This hands-on course introduces students to the basic skills of biblical exegesis and research they will need to become responsible interpreters of Scripture. Through guided exercises, individual projects, and critical reflection on the interpretive process, students will be given the opportunity to gain a solid grounding in biblical interpretation. The course is meant to be taken alongside any 200-level BIB course in Old or New Testament and includes an introduction to library research for the purposes of writing an accomplished exegesis paper. If the student has already taken a 200-level BIB course, this course may be taken concurrently with a 300-level BIB course. Prerequisites: BIB 101 and 102; must be taken concurrently with a 200- or 300-level BIB course in either Old or New Testament.

BIB 201 - Synoptic Gospels [Lecture] (3.0)

This is a study of the life of Jesus based on the three Synoptic Gospels. Specific consideration will be given to the relationship between Jesus' teaching and action and His identity and purpose. Textual issues regarding the similarity and complementarity in the gospel accounts will be explored. The relationship between the Synoptics and the Gospel of John will receive minor consideration. Prerequisites: BIB 101 and 102. (Offered alternate years)

BIB 202 - Acts of the Apostles [Lecture] (3.0)

This study of the unfolding history and thought of the early church is based on the Acts of the Apostles, although other sources will be introduced. A method of inductive Bible Study will be introduced and practiced throughout the course. Prerequisites: BIB 101 and 102. (Offered alternate years)

BIB 206 - The Pentateuch [Lecture] (3.0)

This course is a study of the first five books of the Old Testament. By examining selected passages, students explore Israel's view of origins, the national genesis and early history, God's will for Israel and the world, and the regulations for worship. An emphasis is placed on the examination of the various forms of literature that are represented in the Pentateuch, especially in respect to their role in forming and communicating the central themes and concepts in the Pentateuch. Prerequisites: BIB 101 and 102. (Offered alternate years)

BIB 208 - The Psalms and Wisdom Literature [Lecture] (3.0)

The rich tradition of poetry and wisdom literature in the Old Testament is explored in this course. Selected passages are studied in order to introduce the student to the basic literary structures and the central ideas and terms incorporated in these traditions. The place of the Psalms in the worship of the Old Testament community of faith is an important part of the course. Prerequisites: BIB 101 and 102. (Offered alternate years)

BIB 301 - The Prophets of Israel [Lecture] (3.0)

This course examines selected passages from the prophets of Israel. It will display their unique styles and forms of these passages, their theological emphases, and their responses to the historical crises. Prerequisites: BIB 101, 102, and one 200-level Old Testament BIB course or permission of instructor. (Offered alternate years)

BIB 304 - The Apostle Paul [Lecture] (3.0)

A study of the letters of the Apostle to the Gentiles, this course explores Paul's thought in its context. Special attention will be given to recurring issues and theological themes in Paul's writing. Prerequisites: BIB 101, 102, and one 200-level New Testament BIB course or permission of the instructor. (Offered alternate years)

BIB 305 - The Gospel and Letters of John [Lecture] (3.0)

This study of Johannine literature examines its unique characteristics and theology. Prerequisites: BIB 101, 102, and one 200-level New Testament BIB course or permission of the instructor. (Offered alternate years)

BIB 306 - General Epistles [Lecture] (3.0)

This course will focus on the letter to the Hebrews, exploring its descriptions of Christ's identity and work. Attention will also be given to the letters of James, Peter, and Jude. Prerequisites: BIB 101, 102, and one 200-level New Testament BIB course or permission of the instructor. (Offered alternate years)

BIB 307 - The Bible in its World [Trip] (3.0-6.0)

This course is offered as part of a tour of the Holy Land and other countries, under the direction of a College faculty member. Students taking this course for credit must do collateral readings and assignments in association with the tour. The specifics of individual course design are to be completed and approved by the faculty member and the Division Chair prior to the tour. Prerequisites: BIB 101 and 102 (and one 200-level New Testament BIB course recommended). (Special offering)

BIB 308 - Daniel and Revelation [Lecture] (3.0)

This course surveys the relationship between the Old and New Testaments, including the developments between the testaments. The impetus for this study is located in the challenging books of Daniel and Revelation. An important part of the study is a consideration of the major historical, religious, and literary developments that arise in the intertestamental period. Apocalyptic literature, the LXX, and the Dead Sea Scrolls play a significant role in this regard. Selected texts will be examined to illustrate the main aspects of this study. Prerequisites: BIB 101, 102, and one 200-level Old Testament BIB course or permission of the instructor. (Offered alternate years)

BIB 402 - Topics in Old Testament Theology [Lecture] (3.0)

This course introduces advanced students to in-depth study of major theological themes in the Old Testament or to intensive study of important recent books in Old Testament theology. Different topics and/or books will be selected from year to year. Utilizing class lectures and student-led seminars, the course aims to deepen student understanding of important Old Testament scholarship by exposure to a range of secondary literature in the field. Prerequisites: BIB 101, 102, at least two 200- or 300-level Old Testament BIB courses or permission of instructor. Recommended for seniors. (May be repeated if topic differs.) (Offered alternate years)

BIB 403 - Topics in New Testament Theology [Lecture] (3.0)

This course introduces advanced students to in-depth study of major theological themes in the New Testament or to intensive study of important recent books in New Testament theology. Different topics and/or books will be selected from year to year. Utilizing class lectures and student-led seminars, the course aims to deepen student understanding of important New Testament scholarship by exposure to a range of secondary literature in the field. The focus will be on a "Biblical" rather than "Systematic" theological approach. Prerequisites: BIB 101, 102, and at least two 200- or 300-level New Testament BIB courses or permission of the instructor. Recommended for seniors. (May be repeated if topic differs.) (Offered on demand)

BIB 405 - Old Testament Exegesis [Lecture] (3.0)

This course introduces advanced students to in-depth study of a particular Old Testament book through class lectures and student-led seminars. Books selected for study vary from year to year and might include 1 & 2 Samuel, Amos, Genesis, Isaiah, Job, Exodus, etc. The course will focus on careful literary analysis of, and theological reflection on, the selected Old Testament book, with the aim of helping students learn to become competent and informed exegetes of Scripture. Prerequisites: BIB 101, 102, and at least two 200- or 300-level Old Testament BIB courses or permission of the instructor. Hebrew 101 and 102 are recommended but not required. Recommended for seniors. (May be repeated if topic differs.) (Offered alternate years)

BIB 406 - Seminar in New Testament Exegesis [Lecture] (3.0)

This course introduces advanced students to in-depth study of a particular New Testament book through class lectures and student-led seminars. Books selected for study vary from year to year, and might include Mark, Romans, 1 & 2 Corinthians, Hebrews, Revelation, etc. The course will focus on careful inductive, social and literary analysis of, and theological reflection on, the selected New Testament book, with the aim of helping students learn to become competent and informed exegetes of Scripture. Prerequisite: BIB 101, 102, and at least two 200- or 300-level New Testament BIB courses or permission of the instructor. Greek 101 and 102 recommended but not required. Recommended for seniors. (May be repeated if topic differs.) (Offered on demand)

BIB 495 - Independent Study [Independent Study] (1.0-3.0)

Independent study provides opportunity to pursue advanced or special-interest topics not covered in the curriculum. Prerequisites: 1. Junior standing. 2. A minimum of 9 semester hours in the discipline of the Independent Study. 3. A minimum grade point average of 2.50 in the discipline. 4. Proof of motivation and ability to work independently. 5. Approval of the department in which the study is to be taken. 6. Permission from the student's advisor, the course instructor, the Department Chair, the Academic Dean, and the Registrar.