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Courses

NOTE:
The number in parentheses following the course title indicates the semester hours of credit assigned to the course. An H following the course number indicates an honors level course.

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BIB 101 - Introduction to Old Testament Literature and Theology [Lecture] (3.0)

This course explores the literature and thought of the Old Testament in its original historical setting in the ancient Near East and in the context of the entire biblical story. It introduces students to selected passages that represent the major sections of the Old Testament (Pentateuch, Historical Books, Wisdom Literature, Prophetic Literature) while articulating the overarching narrative coherence of the Old Testament as part of the larger story of God's purposes for the world that the entire Bible recounts.

BIB 101H - Honors Introduction to Old Testament Literature and Theology [Honors Option] (3.0)

This survey of the history, literature, and theology of the Old Testament also addresses the use and interpretation of influential Old Testament passages by later readers. Special attention is given to current scholarship and emerging issues, as well as to student interests.

BIB 102 - Introduction to New Testament Literature and Theology [Lecture] (3.0)

This is a survey of the New Testament Scriptures. This course provides the student with an overview of the biblical and theological foundation upon which Roberts Wesleyan College has been established. The curriculum overviews each of the New Testament books while researching the authors and the literary, sociological, and theological setting with a view toward contemporary application.

BIB 200 - Introduction to Biblical Exegesis and Research [Lecture] (1.0)

This hands-on course introduces students to the basic skills of biblical exegesis and research they will need to become responsible interpreters of Scripture. Through guided exercises, individual projects, and critical reflection on the interpretive process, students will be given the opportunity to gain a solid grounding in biblical interpretation. The course is meant to be taken alongside any 200-level BIB course in Old or New Testament and includes an introduction to library research for the purposes of writing an accomplished exegesis paper. If the student has already taken a 200-level BIB course, this course may be taken concurrently with a 300-level BIB course. Prerequisites: BIB 101 and 102; must be taken concurrently with a 200- or 300-level BIB course in either Old or New Testament.

BIB 201 - Synoptic Gospels [Lecture] (3.0)

This is a study of the life of Jesus based on the three Synoptic Gospels. Specific consideration will be given to the relationship between Jesus' teaching and action and His identity and purpose. Textual issues regarding the similarity and complementarity in the gospel accounts will be explored. The relationship between the Synoptics and the Gospel of John will receive minor consideration. Prerequisites: BIB 101 and 102. (Offered alternate years)

BIB 202 - Acts of the Apostles [Lecture] (3.0)

This study of the unfolding history and thought of the early church is based on the Acts of the Apostles, although other sources will be introduced. A method of inductive Bible Study will be introduced and practiced throughout the course. Prerequisites: BIB 101 and 102. (Offered alternate years)

BIB 206 - The Pentateuch [Lecture] (3.0)

This course is a study of the first five books of the Old Testament. By examining selected passages, students explore Israel's view of origins, the national genesis and early history, God's will for Israel and the world, and the regulations for worship. An emphasis is placed on the examination of the various forms of literature that are represented in the Pentateuch, especially in respect to their role in forming and communicating the central themes and concepts in the Pentateuch. Prerequisites: BIB 101 and 102. (Offered alternate years)

BIB 208 - The Psalms and Wisdom Literature [Lecture] (3.0)

The rich tradition of poetry and wisdom literature in the Old Testament is explored in this course. Selected passages are studied in order to introduce the student to the basic literary structures and the central ideas and terms incorporated in these traditions. The place of the Psalms in the worship of the Old Testament community of faith is an important part of the course. Prerequisites: BIB 101 and 102. (Offered alternate years)

BIB 301 - The Prophets of Israel [Lecture] (3.0)

This course examines selected passages from the prophets of Israel. It will display their unique styles and forms of these passages, their theological emphases, and their responses to the historical crises. Prerequisites: BIB 101, 102, and one 200-level Old Testament BIB course or permission of instructor. (Offered alternate years)

BIB 304 - The Apostle Paul [Lecture] (3.0)

A study of the letters of the Apostle to the Gentiles, this course explores Paul's thought in its context. Special attention will be given to recurring issues and theological themes in Paul's writing. Prerequisites: BIB 101, 102, and one 200-level New Testament BIB course or permission of the instructor. (Offered alternate years)

BIB 305 - The Gospel and Letters of John [Lecture] (3.0)

This study of Johannine literature examines its unique characteristics and theology. Prerequisites: BIB 101, 102, and one 200-level New Testament BIB course or permission of the instructor. (Offered alternate years)

BIB 306 - General Epistles [Lecture] (3.0)

This course will focus on the letter to the Hebrews, exploring its descriptions of Christ's identity and work. Attention will also be given to the letters of James, Peter, and Jude. Prerequisites: BIB 101, 102, and one 200-level New Testament BIB course or permission of the instructor. (Offered alternate years)

BIB 307 - The Bible in its World [Trip] (3.0-6.0)

This course is offered as part of a tour of the Holy Land and other countries, under the direction of a College faculty member. Students taking this course for credit must do collateral readings and assignments in association with the tour. The specifics of individual course design are to be completed and approved by the faculty member and the Division Chair prior to the tour. Prerequisites: BIB 101 and 102 (and one 200-level New Testament BIB course recommended). (Special offering)

BIB 308 - Daniel and Revelation [Lecture] (3.0)

This course surveys the relationship between the Old and New Testaments, including the developments between the testaments. The impetus for this study is located in the challenging books of Daniel and Revelation. An important part of the study is a consideration of the major historical, religious, and literary developments that arise in the intertestamental period. Apocalyptic literature, the LXX, and the Dead Sea Scrolls play a significant role in this regard. Selected texts will be examined to illustrate the main aspects of this study. Prerequisites: BIB 101, 102, and one 200-level Old Testament BIB course or permission of the instructor. (Offered alternate years)

BIB 402 - Topics in Old Testament Theology [Lecture] (3.0)

This course introduces advanced students to in-depth study of major theological themes in the Old Testament or to intensive study of important recent books in Old Testament theology. Different topics and/or books will be selected from year to year. Utilizing class lectures and student-led seminars, the course aims to deepen student understanding of important Old Testament scholarship by exposure to a range of secondary literature in the field. Prerequisites: BIB 101, 102, at least two 200- or 300-level Old Testament BIB courses or permission of instructor. Recommended for seniors. (May be repeated if topic differs.) (Offered alternate years)

BIB 403 - Topics in New Testament Theology [Lecture] (3.0)

This course introduces advanced students to in-depth study of major theological themes in the New Testament or to intensive study of important recent books in New Testament theology. Different topics and/or books will be selected from year to year. Utilizing class lectures and student-led seminars, the course aims to deepen student understanding of important New Testament scholarship by exposure to a range of secondary literature in the field. The focus will be on a "Biblical" rather than "Systematic" theological approach. Prerequisites: BIB 101, 102, and at least two 200- or 300-level New Testament BIB courses or permission of the instructor. Recommended for seniors. (May be repeated if topic differs.) (Offered on demand)

BIB 405 - Old Testament Exegesis [Lecture] (3.0)

This course introduces advanced students to in-depth study of a particular Old Testament book through class lectures and student-led seminars. Books selected for study vary from year to year and might include 1 & 2 Samuel, Amos, Genesis, Isaiah, Job, Exodus, etc. The course will focus on careful literary analysis of, and theological reflection on, the selected Old Testament book, with the aim of helping students learn to become competent and informed exegetes of Scripture. Prerequisites: BIB 101, 102, and at least two 200- or 300-level Old Testament BIB courses or permission of the instructor. Hebrew 101 and 102 are recommended but not required. Recommended for seniors. (May be repeated if topic differs.) (Offered alternate years)

BIB 406 - Seminar in New Testament Exegesis [Lecture] (3.0)

This course introduces advanced students to in-depth study of a particular New Testament book through class lectures and student-led seminars. Books selected for study vary from year to year, and might include Mark, Romans, 1 & 2 Corinthians, Hebrews, Revelation, etc. The course will focus on careful inductive, social and literary analysis of, and theological reflection on, the selected New Testament book, with the aim of helping students learn to become competent and informed exegetes of Scripture. Prerequisite: BIB 101, 102, and at least two 200- or 300-level New Testament BIB courses or permission of the instructor. Greek 101 and 102 recommended but not required. Recommended for seniors. (May be repeated if topic differs.) (Offered on demand)

BIB 495 - Independent Study [Independent Study] (1.0-3.0)

Independent study provides opportunity to pursue advanced or special-interest topics not covered in the curriculum. Prerequisites: 1. Junior standing. 2. A minimum of 9 semester hours in the discipline of the Independent Study. 3. A minimum grade point average of 2.50 in the discipline. 4. Proof of motivation and ability to work independently. 5. Approval of the department in which the study is to be taken. 6. Permission from the student's advisor, the course instructor, the Department Chair, the Academic Dean, and the Registrar.

NOTE:
The number in parentheses following the course title indicates the semester hours of credit assigned to the course. An H following the course number indicates an honors level course.

Click the course title to see details

GRK 101 - Elementary Greek I [Lecture] (3.0)

Beginning students learn the basics of New Testament Greek forms, syntax, and vocabulary through exercises and quizzes. (Offered alternate years)

GRK 102 - Elementary Greek II [Lecture] (3.0)

This course is a continuation of Elementary Greek I and includes some reading from the Johannine writings of the Greek New Testament. Prerequisite: GRK 101 or permission of the instructor. (Offered alternate years)

GRK 201 - Exegetical Greek [Lecture] (3.0)

The method and rules of exegesis are learned. Systematic practice in translating from the Greek New Testament is required. Prerequisite: GRK 102 or permission of the instructor. (Offered alternate years)

GRK 202 - Readings in New Testament Greek [Lecture] (3.0)

This course provides the intermediate student with the opportunity to translate and analyze selected New Testament passages. The focus is on the development of translation and hermeneutical skills through attention to grammar, syntax, and structure. Prerequisite: GRK 201 or permission of the instructor. (Offered alternate years)

GRK 495 - Independent Study in Greek [Independent Study] (3.0)

Independent study provides opportunity to pursue advanced or special-interest topics not covered in the curriculum. Prerequisites: 1. Junior standing. 2. A minimum of 9 semester hours in the discipline of the Independent Study. 3. A minimum grade point average of 2.50 in the discipline. 4. Proof of motivation and ability to work independently. 5. Approval of the department in which the study is to be taken. 6. Permission from the student's advisor, the course instructor, the Department Chair, the Academic Dean, and the Registrar.

NOTE:
The number in parentheses following the course title indicates the semester hours of credit assigned to the course. An H following the course number indicates an honors level course.

Click the course title to see details

HEB 101 - Elementary Hebrew I [Lecture] (3.0)

Beginning students learn the basics of biblical Hebrew. The course lectures introduce the student to the language in a systematic way, beginning with the simple and regular forms and then processing toward the more complex aspects of the language. The emphasis is on mastering the basic forms, syntax, and vocabulary through exercises and quizzes. (Offered alternate years)

HEB 102 - Elementary Hebrew II [Lecture] (3.0)

Beginning students continue to develop their understanding of the basics of biblical Hebrew. The course lectures continue to present the simple and regular forms, while progressing toward the more complex aspects of the language. The emphasis continues to be on mastering the basic forms, syntax, and vocabulary through exercises and quizzes. The student applies and reinforces developing language skills through translating short sections of the Hebrew text of the Old Testament. Prerequisite: HEB 101. (Offered alternate years)

HEB 201 - Intermediate Hebrew I [Lecture] (3.0)

This course builds on the foundation laid in Elementary Hebrew I & II. The main emphasis of this course is on the continuing development of the student's understanding of Hebrew grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, as well as the cultivation of basic reading skills in the Hebrew text. Regular reading assignments taken from selected portions of the biblical text, e.g. Genesis and Ruth, provide an opportunity to gain basic proficiency in reading narrative passages in the Hebrew text of the Old Testament. Integrated into the reading of the text is an inductive review of the basics of the language. The grammar and syntax assignments introduce the student to a significant number of weak and irregular forms and assist in developing a strategy for rapid recognition of such forms. Vocabulary building continues to emphasize frequent and important forms. The course also introduces the student to some of the basic principles of Hebrew lexical studies and the basic lexical tools that are available to the student of Biblical Hebrew. Prerequisite: HEB 102. (Offered alternate years)

HEB 202 - Intermediate Hebrew II [Lecture] (3.0)

This course prepares the student for exegetical studies in the Hebrew text of the Old Testament. The approach of the course is to work intensively with selected texts, while expanding and deepening the student's knowledge of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. A number of important resources for the study of grammar and syntax are introduced in conjunction with the solution of grammatical and syntactical problems in the text. Sound hermeneutical principles are discussed at the appropriate points, and especially those related to the effective use of biblical languages in the study of the Old Testament. The student is given the opportunity to compare her/his own insights with those found in standard commentaries as the course progresses. The texts studied in this course are taken primarily from the hymnic, wisdom, and prophetic literature of the Old Testament. Important aspects of working with Hebrew poetic texts in particular are discussed. Throughout the course, the student is introduced to a number of standard reference works and resources that are of great benefit to the student who is proficient in the Hebrew language. Prerequisite: HEB 201. (Offered alternate years)

NOTE:
The number in parentheses following the course title indicates the semester hours of credit assigned to the course. An H following the course number indicates an honors level course.

Click the course title to see details

THE 275 - Introduction to Christian Theology [Lecture] (3.0)

This course provides an introduction to the main themes of Christian theology from both systematic and biblical perspectives. Areas of exploration will include the doctrines of God, creation, humanity, revelation, redemption, church, and last things. In addition to offering a survey of the major tenets of the Christian faith, this course seeks to encourage inquiry about the nature of Christian faith and helps students develop their abilities to think and express themselves theologically. Prerequisites: BIB 101, 102, PHL 202 - Religion; HST 102/103 strongly recommended.

THE 305 - World Religions [Lecture] (3.0)

This study will focus on Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism, giving attention to the origins, development, literature, and belief systems of these religions. Issues of inter-religious dialogue will be examined. Also listed as REL 305. Prerequisites: BIB 101, 102, HST 102/103, PHL 202-Religion, and THE 275 or permission of the instructor.

THE 320 - Religion and Society [Lecture] (3.0)

(See SOC 320 for description)

THE 325 - Seminar in Wesleyan Thought [Lecture] (3.0)

This course examines the thought of John Wesley and his interpreters down to the present. Prerequisites: BIB 101, BIB 102, PHL 202 -Religion, and THE 275 or permission of the instructor. (Offered alternate years)

THE 340 - Special Topics - Living the Future: Medicine, the Environment and the New Theism [Lecture] (3.0)

The increasingly rapid global growth of technology presents unprecedented challenges to everyday life, especially in areas of health, disease, and the environment. Science seeks both to understand the connections among these areas and to find strategies to negotiate the challenges. In addition, the current rise of a "new atheism" centered in the scientific community reveals a crisis of meaning about issues such as the value and purpose of human life. This course will, first, introduce the student to aspects of environmental medicine of contemporary importance such as climate change and disease, food safety and food supply, and intangible human needs for a sense of place and significance. Second, it will examine the theological assumptions and frameworks that may unify these apparently disconnected features of contemporary life. Finally, the course will allow the student to explore in depth the interactions among medicine, the environment and the "New Theism" (defined as the natural theology arising out of the current dialog between science and faith) through case studies of three historic eras and projects of individual interest. Also listed as BIO 340. Prerequisites: PHL 202 and a lower-level BIO/CHM. (Offered alternate years)

THE 350 - Theology & Gender [Lecture] (3.0)

This course is designed to help the student understand the influence that gender has on biblical interpretation and theological perspectives. Included among the topics of discussion is a consideration of the biblical material related to the nature of the human being as well as the ethical and social implications of a theology of human equality. In addition, the course seeks to expose the student to major models of feminist theological interpretation. It is hoped that this exposure, along with class discussion and reflection, will assist the student in coming to her or his own assessment of the relative value of each of these models for articulating a faithful and constructive theology for contemporary culture. Also listed as WST 350. Prerequisites: BIB 101, 102, and PHL 202. (Offered alternate years)

THE 375 - Biblical Theology & Contemporary Culture [Lecture] (3.0)

This advanced interdisciplinary seminar course explores the intersection of the biblical worldview with contemporary postmodern culture. The course addresses different foci from year to year. These might include biblical resources for meeting the challenges of postmodern life and ministry, contemporary Christian responses to postmodern thought, critical analysis of popular music in contemporary culture, and an appraisal of postmodern interpretive strategies for reading Scripture. Prerequisites: BIB 101, 102, THE 200, THE 275, and PHL 202 - Religion. Recommended for juniors and seniors. (Offered alternate years)

THE 401 - Theological Issues in Historical Perspective [Lecture] (3.0)

Christian thought is examined as it developed in its environments. The course focuses on selected scholars or topics. Prerequisites: BIB 101, BIB 102, PHL 202-Religion, and THE 275 or permission of the instructor. (Offered alternate years)

THE 406 - Psychology and Theology [Lecture] (3.0)

(See PSY 406 for description)

THE 409 - Selected Topics in Theological Studies [Lecture] (3.0)

This course is an upper-level seminar for students desiring advanced study in the craft of theology. Through examination of the writings of selected theologians, Christian thinkers, and theological topics, the course offers an in-depth analysis of the various sources, norms, and criteria that have been used in the development of Christian theology. Content differs from year to year. Prerequisites: BIB 101, BIB 102, PHL 202-Religion, and THE 275 or permission of the instructor. (May be repeated if content differs.) (Offered alternate years)

THE 495 - Independent Study in Theology [Independent Study] (3.0)

Independent study provides opportunity to pursue advanced or special-interest topics not covered in the curriculum. Prerequisites: 1. Junior standing. 2. A minimum of 9 semester hours in the discipline of the Independent Study. 3. A minimum grade point average of 2.50 in the discipline. 4. Proof of motivation and ability to work independently. 5. Approval of the department in which the study is to be taken. 6. Permission from the student's advisor, the course instructor, the Department Chair, the Academic Dean, and the Registrar.