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Courses

NOTE:
The number in parentheses following the course title indicates the semester hours of credit assigned to the course. An H following the course number indicates an honors level course.

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PHY 101 - General Physics I [Laboratory] (1.0)

Laboratory work illustrates the major concepts of PHY 101, which is to be taken concurrently. Course fee applicable.

PHY 101 - General Physics I [Lecture] (3.0)

This lecture and demonstration course is the first of two courses that present fundamental concepts and methods of classical and modern physics including kinematics, dynamics, energy and momentum, gravitation, properties of matter, electromagnetism, wave motion, light, atomic theory, nuclear theory, and particle physics. Algebra and trigonometry are used extensively. Little or no calculus is used. Prerequisites: high school algebra, trigonometry, and physics.

PHY 102 - General Physics II [Laboratory] (1.0)

Laboratory work illustrates the major concepts of PHY 102, which is to be taken concurrently. Course fee applicable.

PHY 102 - General Physics II [Lecture] (3.0)

This lecture, demonstration, and laboratory course is the second of two courses that present fundamental concepts and methods of classical and modern physics including kinematics, dynamics, energy and momentum, gravitation, properties of matter, electromagnetism, wave motion, light, atomic theory, nuclear theory, and particle physics. Algebra and trigonometry are used extensively. Little or no calculus is used. Prerequisite: PHY 101.

PHY 110 - Survey of Engineering [Lecture] (1.0)

As a seminar course, students will listen to invited speakers talk about their degree, field of engineering and job experience. Through this and a subsequent discussion, students will gain exposure to multiple fields of engineering which will help them to make an informed decision about the field of engineering they would like to pursue. In addition to this, students will read about and discuss the importance of engineering and famous engineering faux pas. Included in this course is a visit to RIT to check out their mechanical and microelectronic engineering programs and research facilities. If sufficient interest arises, we may also visit either RPI or Clarkson University to learn about their programs. By the end of this course, students will have explored the various fields of engineering and have officially entered the engineering program, complete with an individualized 3 or 5 year planned curriculum to guide their studies over the course of their program.

PHY 115 - Physics of Music [Lecture and Laboratory] (3.0)

The student is introduced to the physics of music through the study of wave mechanics, the production of the voice, musical instruments, and acoustics. The student will have an opportunity to investigate wave phenomena, build musical instruments, and explore the acoustics of spaces on campus in the laboratory time. This course fulfills the general education lab science requirement. Prerequisites: high school algebra and trigonometry. Course fee applicable.

PHY 201 - Physics for Engineers and Scientists I [Laboratory] (1.0)

Laboratory work illustrates the major concepts of PHY 201, which is to be taken concurrently. Course fee applicable.

PHY 201 - Physics for Engineers and Scientists I [Lecture] (3.0)

Presents Newtonian mechanics, rotational, projectile and oscillatory motion in addition to conservation laws including momentum and energy with extensive vector calculus (introduced in class). Prerequisites: high school physics, algebra, and trigonometry. Corequisite: MTH 281.

PHY 202 - Physics for Engineers and Scientists II [Laboratory] (1.0)

Laboratory work illustrates the major concepts of PHY 202, which is to be taken concurrently. Course fee applicable.

PHY 202 - Physics for Engineers and Scientists II [Lecture] (3.0)

Relativity and electricity and magnetism are discussed, including the nature of time, coordinate transformations, velocity transformations, four-momentum, electrostatics, fields, potential, conductors, currents, magnets, flux, Gauss's and Ampere's law, the electromagnetic field and an introduction to Maxwell's equations and electromagnetic waves through the extensive use of vector calculus. Prerequisite: PHY 201 or equivalent. Corequisite: MTH 282.

PHY 203 - Physics for Engineers and Scientists III [Laboratory] (1.0)

Laboratory work illustrates the major concepts of PHY 203, which is to be taken concurrently. Course fee applicable.

PHY 203 - Physics for Engineers and Scientists III [Lecture] (3.0)

Thermal and quantum physics are discussed, including the wave and particle nature of light and matter, atoms, spectra, nuclear behavior, ideal gases, processes, laws of thermodynamics, entropy and heat engines through the extensive use of vector calculus. Prerequisites: PHY 202 and MTH 282.

PHY 210 - Statics [Lecture] (3.0)

This course is a study of the fundamental concepts of the statics of particles and rigid bodies using a vector analysis approach. Topics include forces, torques, equilibrium conditions, centroid, trusses, frames, machines, beams, cables, and friction. Prerequisite: PHY 201.

PHY 211 - Electric Circuits [Lecture] (3.0)

This course is a study of the fundamental concepts of electric circuits. Topics include DC circuits, network theorems, complex numbers, sinusoids, phasors, AC circuits, power, frequency response, and resonance. Prerequisite: PHY 202. (Offered alternate years)

PHY 301 - Classical Mechanics [Lecture] (3.0)

Particle and rigid body dynamics, conservative motion, central forces, accelerated coordinate systems and Lagrange's equations of motion are covered with a brief survey of chaos and Hamiltonian Mechanics. Prerequisites: PHY 201 and MTH 283. (Offered alternate years)

PHY 302 - Electricity & Magnetism [Lecture] (3.0)

This study of the fundamental concepts and applications of electromagnetism includes vector calculus, electrostatics, magnetostatics, electromagnetic induction, electric circuits, and an introduction to the use of Maxwell's equations. Prerequisites: PHY 202 and MTH 283. (Offered alternate years)

PHY 303 - Optics [Lecture and Laboratory] (4.0)

A study of electromagnetic waves, this course includes general descriptions, production, polarization, coherence, interference, diffraction, and the principles and applications of lasers. Laboratory experience provides hands-on interaction with the course material. Prerequisites: PHY 203 and MTH 283. (Offered alternate years)

PHY 350 - Structured Study [Lecture] (1.0-3.0)

Students complete a structured study of approved advanced topics in physics. May be repeated with different topics. (Offered on demand)

PHY 401 - Quantum Physics [Lecture] (3.0)

The fundamentals of quantum theory are studied, with applications to atomic and molecular systems. Prerequisites: PHY 203 and MTH 283. (Offered alternate years)

PHY 403 - Nuclear and Particle Physics [Lecture] (3.0)

This is a study of the fundamentals of nuclear and particle physics. Prerequisite: PHY 401. (Offered on demand)

PHY 450 - Internship [Practicum] (3.0-6.0)

This internship provides the opportunity to gain practical experience in a laboratory or field placement. (Offered on demand)

PHY 495 - Independent Study in Physics [Independent Study] (1.0-3.0)

Independent study provides opportunity to pursue advanced or special-interest topics not covered in the curriculum. Prerequisites: 1. Junior standing. 2. A minimum of 9 semester hours in the discipline of the Independent Study. 3. A minimum grade point average of 2.50 in the discipline. 4. Proof of motivation and ability to work independently. 5. Approval of the department in which the study is to be taken. 6. Permission from the student's advisor, the course instructor, the Department Chair, the Academic Dean, and the Registrar.

PHY 498 - Undergraduate Research [Independent Study] (1.0-3.0)

Students conduct research under supervision of a faculty member. A written report is required. Permission of instructor is required. Prerequisites: 1. Junior standing. 2. A minimum of 9 semester hours in the discipline of the Independent Study. 3. A minimum grade point average of 2.50 in the discipline. 4. Proof of motivation and ability to work independently. 5. Approval of the division in which the study is to be taken. 6. Permission from the student's advisor, the course instructor, the Division Chair, and the Registrar. The course may be repeated. (Offered on demand)