Home - Graduate - Programs - Psy.D. Clinical/School Psychology - Course Sequence & Descriptions

Doctor of Psychology - Courses

The Doctor of Psychology program has been designed for full-time enrollment.

Year One (click on course for description)

DPSY 5600 | Adult Psychopathology

This course contributes to the core knowledge necessary for the science and practice of clinical psychology. The goal of this course is to present a conceptual framework for understanding the science of psychopathology in order to inform clinical practice. Toward this end, the course will focus on central concepts important in the description, classification, and treatment of psychopathology, including relevant aspects of the historical and cultural context of these concepts. We will explore etiological issues, the application of a biopsychosocial conceptual framework to case conceptualization, and skill development in the diagnosis of psychopathology. Issues related to socioeconomic status, gender, age, culture and comorbidity will be addressed across the course.

DPSY 5300 | Advanced Developmental Psychology

This course provides a broad understanding of individual development. Study will focus on the major themes and issues of physical, cognitive, social, and moral development, with particular emphasis placed on foundational research and theory in these areas, and the interaction of self and social contexts in developmental processes.

DPSY 5030 | Clinical Foundations of Intervention I

This interactive course focuses on the training and practice of interpersonal skills which are vital to functioning as a professional psychologist or counselor.  The course will be centered on a three stage helping model which assists individuals in exploring their problems, gaining insights, and taking action.  In developing this helping model, three counseling theories will be explored:  person-centered therapy, psychodynamic therapy, and behavior therapy.  The course will largely focus on the skill development necessary to initiate helping relationships with diverse populations.

DPSY 5200 | Assessment I: Psychological Measurement

This course is designed as an introduction to testing and measurement.  Primary emphasis will be placed on building a general understanding of elementary statistics and analysis of test scores in relation to the normal curve.  An understanding of reliability, validity, and normative samples, and non-biased test construction will be explored.  Students will gain a general understanding of both the purpose and practice of assessment and various methods of diagnostic problem solving related to a variety of human characteristics.  It is important to note that this course only serves as an introduction to testing and assessment and that further courses/skills training are needed for students interested in specializing in assessment.

DPSY 5220 | Assessment II & III: Individual Differences

Students will be exposed to and achieve competency in the administration, scoring, and interpretation practices of the most widely accepted instruments of today. Use and abuse issues will be discussed along with their level of sensitivity and validity with special populations (i.e. developmentally disabled & gifted). The most widely accepted Theoretical Model of Intelligence within the context of CHC Theory will be reviewed and discussed.

DPSY 5400 | Cognitive-Affective Bases of Behavior

This course will emphasize current literature on cognitive processes and emotion. Topics covered in class will include attention, motivation, memory, and decision making, and will place a special emphasis on how emotion interacts with these cognitive processes. A portion of the course will also emphasize topics as they relate to children, such as emotion regulation and understanding cognition/emotion through a developmental lens. Students will also learn how to integrate behavioral principles with theories of cognition and emotion.

DPSY 5040 | Clinical Foundations of Intervention II

This course is designed to build upon the basic counseling skills and knowledge developed in Clinical Foundations of Intervention I (DPSY/GEDC/GPSY 5030), in order to promote foundational competencies in evidence-based intervention. The content of the course includes: common factors and the therapeutic alliance; transtheoretical case formulation; selected theoretical models of therapy; and therapy process and outcome assessment. The practicum portion of the course focuses on the application of this material to clients, and the further development of counseling skills and competencies.

DPSY 6210 | Integrative Assessment IV: Social-Emotional Assessment

This course focuses on the assessment of personality, psychopathology, and social-emotional functioning in children, adolescents, and adults. The course covers the historical, theoretical, and empirical aspects of assessment as well as applied knowledge (i.e., scoring, administration, interpretation) relating to several widely-used instruments, including self-report and performance-based measures. A major component of the course is learning to integrate assessment results from different instruments into clear and concise written reports. Students will have the opportunity to practice and apply skills through a series of assignments designed to develop the skills necessary to conduct comprehensive assessments in a variety of clinical and school settings.

DPSY 6640 | Group Dynamics and Group Counseling

This is an introductory graduate level course in group dynamics and group counseling.  The content includes an overview of group process, leader roles, member roles, and types of groups in school and clinical settings.  A variety of therapeutic approaches are presented and specific group counseling techniques for working with children, adolescents and adults in a variety of settings.  Issues in working in an ethical manner with diverse student/client populations are presented.

DPSY 5420 | Biological Bases of Behavior/Pharmacology

This course has a focus on two areas of study: (1) the neurobiological bases that underlie cognition, emotions and behavior, and (2) general principles of psychopharmacology.

Students will explore the brain systems that are involved in thinking, feeling, and doing, and learn how disturbances in these systems can lead to psychopathology. The role of genetics, environmental risk factors and epigenetics will be discussed from a developmental perspective.

Students will also learn about commonly administered psychotropic drugs, their effects on the nervous system and the changes they produce in mood, consciousness, perception and behavior. The synergy between psychopharmacological and psychosocial treatments used to bring about a reduction in symptoms will be examined.

DPSY 7160 | Exceptionality and Diversity

Inclusion of exceptional children and youth in unrestricted learning environments, and their academic success and social adjustment, requires school personnel to develop expertise in the recognition of special needs and a broad knowledge of appropriate school-based strategies for ensuring academic success and social development.  This course is designed as a graduate-level introduction to the history, major issues, and contemporary practices defining exceptionalities, their categorization, and demographic characteristics.

DPSY 5650 | Child & Adolescent Psychopathology

This course is designed to explore the complexities of child and adolescent psychopathology, with a specific emphasis on the school setting. The content will focus on the epidemiology, symptomatology, etiology, comorbidity, and treatment of different psychopathologies experienced by children and adolescents. Common assessment strategies and classification systems, such as the DSM-5, will be examined, along with their strengths and weaknesses. Intervention and prevention approaches for specific disorders will be discussed, including a particular focus on school-based intervention programs.

Year Two (click on course for description)

DPSY 6050 | History and Systems of Psychology

This course will provide an inclusive history of modern psychology by presenting an historical overview of the major theories, philosophies, and trends within the field. The social, cultural, philosophical, political, religious, and economic factors that contributed to the making of psychology’s history will be examined. By understanding how major theories have been constructed, students can better understand and compare different theoretical viewpoints, and gain awareness of how the theories fit with their own worldview and approach to clinical work. This course will focus not only on the history of the science of psychology but also on the profession of psychology, emphasizing the four principal applied specialties: clinical, counseling, industrial/organizational, and school psychology.

DPSY 5160/6160 | Practicum I & II: Clinical/School

This practicum experience is designed as a transition from formal coursework to learning experiences within a clinical setting, under the direct supervision of a licensed psychologist. Supervised clinical experiences include assessment, diagnosis, and intervention activities with inpatient and outpatient clientele. Hospital, private and public clinics, mental health organizations, schools, and college counseling centers are utilized as training sites.

DPSY 6030 | Multicultural Diversity and Professional Practice

This course is designed to develop multicultural competency in professional mental health practice. The focus will be on increasing students’ awareness of their cultural values and biases, while also developing knowledge about how race, ethnicity, gender, religion, sexual orientation, and social class have an impact on self and the helper-student or helper-client relationship. Additional emphasis will be placed on surveying culturally responsive skills that are necessary to evaluate and intervene with diverse client systems.

DPSY 8100 | Professional Ethics and Standards of Practice

This course provides guidelines for ethical conduct in the science and practice of psychology. It will offer an in-depth look at the necessary knowledge, awareness, and skills that are important to practice safely and responsibly in the field of psychology. Students will learn how to apply ethical standards in a positive and competent manner, and be appropriately sensitive when working with individuals from diverse backgrounds. The course will also assist students in exploring their personal values and how they relate to the American Psychological Association ethics code. A significant component of the course will also be utilized to discuss specific ethical dilemmas, and the appropriate decision making process to use when faced with such dilemmas. Primary attention will be given to understanding NYS Law and the practice of professional psychology.  Specifically, students will be expected to have a full understanding of N.Y. EDN. LAW Section 6509 (Definitions of Professional Misconduct), and Section 6511 (Penalties for professional misconduct) and Article 153 (use of the term psychologist).  In addition, Part 29 of NYS Educational law will be discussed which relates to misconduct within the professions as prescribed by the NYS Board of Regents, as well as laws of other agencies or the State, such as the “Safe Act.” The course will also assist students in preparing for future licensure by ensuring that they are familiar with the NY State regulations and process for obtaining licensure.

DPSY 6220 | Integrative Assessment V: Neuropsychological

This course provides knowledge and training in fundamental concepts of child and adolescent assessment guided by an understanding of brain-behavior correlates and child development. Students are instructed in the use of an integrated neuropsychological model with relevance for applied psychological practice. A special focus is placed on the assessment of neuropsychological factors that impact cognitive, academic and social-emotional functioning. Students will learn how to select appropriate evaluation techniques to answer referral questions, administer and score those instruments, interpret the results, integrate information across sources, and communicate their findings orally and in writing.

Prerequisites: DPSY 5220 and DPSY 5420

DPSY 6040 | Evidence-Based Treatments and Intervention

This course is designed to foster the integration of clinical science and practice by examining the history, nature, and process of evidence-based practice.  The course will emphasize evidence-based intervention strategies and programs designed to improve the emotional, behavioral, and social functioning of children, adolescents, and adults. Service delivery at the individual, group, and systems level will be addressed. Implementation issues specific to school and clinical settings will be examined.

DPSY 7340 | Play Therapy

The purpose of this didactic-experiential course is to provide students with exposure to and an opportunity to develop knowledge and skills in using play therapy with individuals, families and groups in diverse settings.  Students will become firmly grounded in child-directed play therapy and then become familiar with various theoretical practice models of play therapy, the rationale behind the use of play therapy, and the techniques used for effective play therapy in schools and mental health settings.  This course will expose the student to basic knowledge about play therapy as a component of professional practice in schools, and school-related programs in a variety of settings.

DPSY 7000 | Advanced Integration of Psychology and Theology

The integration of psychology and theology involves respect for the value of each discipline and the conviction that, in important ways, each discipline has something to offer the other.  This course will consider some of the ways in which psychology and theology seem to have something to offer each other.  The course will begin with a consideration of some of the historical and philosophical issues that impact efforts to integrate the two disciplines.  The course will then consider specific areas where psychology and theology have been in dialogue.  Finally, there will be time for students to present their own overviews of selected integration topics.

DPSY 6010 | Research Methods & Statistics I

This course is designed to help students gain an understanding of and appreciation for the use of research as a tool for professional evidence-based practice with and on behalf of school populations and to evaluate educational programs and practices. Students in this course are introduced to the concepts and skills underlying a systematic approach to educational research, including basic research terminology, the scientific method in education, the value of research in education, research ethics, problem formulation and conceptualization, measurement, research designs, sampling, and alternative quantitative and qualitative data gathering techniques.

DPSY 8300 | Advanced Social-Cognitive Psychology

Psychology is the study of how people influence each other.  Topics of interest to social psychologists span a number of areas, including interpersonal relationships, the self in social context, social influence, attitude change, prejudice, prosocial behavior, and the social environment.  Students will read and discuss seminal publications in each of these areas, as well as in the area of social cognition. This field combines classic social psychology with the methods and theories of cognitive psychology to study how people perceive, interpret, and remember information about themselves, other people, and social groups. Finally, there will be time for students to present their own overviews of selected social-cognitive psychology topics.

DPSY 8020 | Marriage and Family Therapy

This course will survey major family therapy theoretical models with particular attention paid to the different conceptions of healthy and dysfunctional dynamics, goals in family therapy treatment, and associated therapeutic approaches and techniques. The focus will be on increasing students’ ability to conceptualizing family and couple dynamics and understanding how these dynamics are related to presenting problems in client systems. Additional emphasis will be placed on the development of practical skills and techniques necessary to evaluate and intervene with family systems.

Year Three (click on course for description)

DPSY 6550 | Consultation for Prevention and Intervention

This course is designed to teach the skills and methods of psychological and educational consultation as practiced in a wide array of human services settings including schools, mental health centers, hospitals and agencies.  Students will be introduced to basic concepts in consultation with a major emphasis placed on behavioral, instructional, mental health, organizational and crisis consultation models.  The usefulness of these indirect service approaches will be based on the assumption that the mental health practitioner will be able to provide prevention and intervention services to a greater number of at risk clients.  Subsequently, this course will address relevant strategies for promoting change in individuals, small groups, and larger organizational systems.  The primary stages of consultation will be explored along with applied in-class and school-based experiential components that will assist students in learning about the process of consultation.  Prevention practices in these settings will be discussed within the context of these consultation models and professional ethics and legal issues surrounding consultation will be reviewed as well.

DPSY 8010 | Research Methods and Statistics II

This course is designed to help students gain an understanding of and appreciation for the use of research as a tool for professional evidence-based practice with and on behalf of school populations and to evaluate educational programs and practices. Students in this course are introduced to the concepts and skills underlying a systematic approach to educational research, including basic research terminology, the scientific method in education, the value of research in education, research ethics, problem formulation and conceptualization, measurement, research designs, sampling, and alternative quantitative and qualitative data gathering techniques.

DPSY 8500/8510 | School Psychology Internship

The internship represents the culminating experience in the Specialist and Doctoral program in School Psychology at Roberts Wesleyan College. Its purpose is to provide intensive, supervised experience in the roles and functions of the school psychologist, as well as to provide a broad exposure to the educational and community environment of the internship site. The internship may occur on a full-time basis over a period of one academic year or on a half-time basis over a period of two consecutive academic years for students in the Masters Program and part time (600 hours) for students in the Doctoral program. The intern will learn to apply skills, knowledge and attitudes learned in classes, field and practicum experiences in daily
professional practice. The internship will provide the necessary opportunities for students to integrate their knowledge and applied skills in working with children, families, and school personnel under the supervision of a professional school psychologist.

DPSY 8600/8610 | Dissertation I and II

The Capstone Applied Project is a culminating experience in the Clinical/School Psychology Psy.D. Program, in which students address an applied problem relevant for the professional practice of Clinical/School Psychology. The project will be conducted under the supervision of Department faculty and will address an issue or problem from these respective areas. The project provides a unique opportunity for students to integrate research and clinical practice, and to develop the research and clinical competencies established earlier in the program. It also provides an opportunity to connect student’s professional development with service to the larger clinical/school community.

DPSY 7150 | Clinical Supervision

This course includes the study of the process of supervision and various models of supervision within schools and clinical settings.  Students will gain experience with supervision by supervising students enrolled in the 1st year practicum experience.

DPSY 8040 | Advanced Clinical Skills Seminar

This seminar will help students integrate and refine various clinical skills required for professional psychological practice, including clinical interviewing, assessment, case conceptualization, treatment planning, and treatment intervention. A case conference format will be primarily used to ensure students engage in self-reflective practice as well as to develop critical thinking and problem solving skills applied to clinical situations.

Year Four (click on course for description)

DPSY 8700/8710 | Internship in Clinical/School Psychology

The internship represents the culminating experience for the Psy.D. program in Clinical/School at Roberts Wesleyan College. Its purpose is to provide intensive, supervised experience in the roles and functions of the practicing psychologist, as well as to provide a broad exposure to the educational and community environment of the internship site. The 1750 hour internship may occur on a full-time basis over a period of one academic year or on a half-time basis over a period of two consecutive academic years.

The intern will learn to apply skills, knowledge and attitudes learned in classes, field and practicum experiences in daily professional practice. The internship will provide the necessary opportunities for students to integrate their knowledge and applied skills in working with children, families, adult/adolescent populations, and/or school personnel under the supervision of a professional Licensed or school psychologist. The “ideal” internship provides a balance between breadth and depth of experience. This growth experience requires regular and consistent contact with supervisors, which in turn allows for the natural evolution of the intern from student to professional.

In order to meet program requirements, Psy.D. students are required to complete a minimum of 2000 hours of internship experience. An internship should occur throughout an entire year, as it is important that interns experience the ebb and flow of the various professional activities that naturally occur within a year in the setting. A written contractual agreement (see appendix in field manual) between the intern and the school district or agency site should specify the period of internship and the terms of the compensation. Interns are responsible for providing the university supervisor with a copy of this agreement. Internship sites must be approved by the Roberts Wesleyan College, School or Clinical Psychology Program Director and are expected to provide exposure to multiple age levels and program experiences.

Total Credits: 96

585.594.6600 or AGE-Admissions@roberts.edu

Related Majors

School Psychology, M.S. - Our Masters in School Psychology program prepares students to evaluate, diagnose, and treat children and adolescents, in consultation with parents and teachers.
Adult and Graduate Admissions - 585.594.6600 | 800.777.4792 (toll free) - AGE-Admissions@roberts.edu